Illinois What do most do for developing?

LikeStig

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Where do most do their developing? I moved to Chicago a couple of years ago and have never gotten a clear answer from people I ask.

When I was in High School my art teacher let me use his darkroom, and that's where I began to experiment with my photography. Now I go to DePaul and don't have access to a darkroom and want to get back into analog B+W photography. I took a GenEd photo class at school and am once again infatuated with having physical prints :rolleyes:.

Do most just give the film to someone else? I'm at a point right now where I might be able to afford a Canon 5d MkI or sell my two lenses and digital gear afford a decent Rangefinder (Early M6) with a lens.

Thanks.
 
I develop my own black and white film in the kitchen sink, and scan it with a Nikon film scanner. Health problems make darkroom printing impossible for me.
 
I do my developing in the kitchen. A tank, some developer and fix, a timer and a thermometer and off you go. The stuff can be found cheaply new, and nearly free or free used. The old camera store in Chicago (name slips my mind right now)- them and mail order from places like B&H or Freestyle. Good luck.
 
Downstairs bathroom also doubles as a temporary darkroom since I can block out all outside light in this area during the day when printing...I also develop film in there too...
Load the reels on the kitchen table using a changing bag...use the kitchen counter when drying prints...I do what I can in order to develop & print...
 
I built a darkroom in the basement, in a corner that has running water and drain. My darkroom measures about six by thirteen feet. I built a wooden darkroom sink, made a counter from a surplus sink-counter from the surplus store, and set the enlarger on an old wooden desk.
 
For printing....

http://chicagocommunitydarkroom.org/

I haven't tried it but I've heard good things.
Regardless, it's a valuable resource for printing.
It's not too far from the blue line in Bucktown.

If you're interested, I can probably find a cheap or free enlarger...if you have the room. A car will likely be required however.

In college I processed and printed in a small 2nd bedroom for a couple of years. An understanding roommate is a must :)
 
From http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subscription/darkroom.html

Building a traditional 'wet' darkroom is a lot easier than most people imagine. You don't need running water; you don't need much space; and with the Gadarene rush to digital, there are endless quantities of darkroom equipment on the market at rock-bottom prices -- often, indeed, free for the asking. We hope that this module will help you design your darkroom and help you avoid some of the mistakes we have made over the years. It's also an unashamed plug for the Nova darkroom tent, which we have now used in three houses, in three countries, and for Nova deep-slot tanks.

Our current darkroom was converted from the old wine-cellar in our house, and is the first room we had rebuilt when we bought the place.

Cheers,

R.
 
Helix off the blue line is a great resource, but if you shoot b&w and want keep your photography economically reasonable, get the chemicals and start developing at home. You'll save money and learn more in the process. I just started developing on my own again for the first time since a couple of years back. It's not only cheaper, but also enhances the whole photographic process.
 
For printing....

http://chicagocommunitydarkroom.org/

I haven't tried it but I've heard good things.
Regardless, it's a valuable resource for printing.
It's not too far from the blue line in Bucktown.


I've been there. It's a good place, with plenty of enlargers, and very reasonably priced. They supply all the chemicals that you need - you just supply the negatives and paper.
 
In a Paterson tank in the kitchen ... the kitchen has a more stable temperature than the darkroom ... the lady wife can be less stable about the smell though

Then scan and pre-press before taking them to a lab to be printed ... I get better results now than when wet printing myself
 
When I get the chance, I develope my b/w at home in the utility room. I had a sink built in from the beginning, and added a bench for b/w as well as an Omega enlarger. I just need more time. Color I have to take to CVS.
 
me said:
I haven't tried it but I've heard good things.
Regardless, it's a valuable resource for printing.
It's not too far from the blue line in Bucktown.
I've been there. It's a good place, with plenty of enlargers, and very reasonably priced.
They supply all the chemicals that you need - you just supply the negatives and paper.
Ahh, so that's where I heard the feedback! :)
 
So...

After much deliberation I have decided to make the switch :cool:. If anyone in the area comes across any darkroom supplies (Enlarger, chemicals, trays, anything really) please share them with me. I'll be scouring the web myself, but any help is appreciated.

In the meantime, if anyone is looking for a pristine pair of lenses (Canon EF 17-40L and a 50mm F/1.4) you know where to find them.

Thanks again.
 
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