Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Rangefinder Photography Discussion

Rangefinder Photography Discussion General discussions about Rangefinder Photography. This is a great place for questions and answers that are not addressed in a specific category. Take note there is also a General Photography forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Leica IIIf slow speeds - help needed
Old 07-27-2005   #1
john neal
fallor ergo sum
 
john neal's Avatar
 
john neal is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Albion
Posts: 1,685
Leica IIIf slow speeds - help needed

Hi,

I just picked up a IIIf in reasonable condition - only 2 faults, the baseplate is a bit corroded and the slow speeds are in need of adjustment.

Does anyone know how to do the speed thing? I have been to Rick Oleson's site at http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-154.html and that has somewhat frightened me - so many little screws to remove to get at the innards!

I don't think I will be investing in a commercial CLA as the body cost me well less than the price of a CLA (I'm tight!).

Any suggestions very welcome

Regards
John
__________________
Regards,

John
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-27-2005   #2
kiev4a
Registered User
 
kiev4a is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Age: 72
Posts: 1,000
I'm sure some members work on Leicas but a camera like the IIIF isn't nearly as easy to work on as say, a Zorki or FED 1, which are similar. The reason? Leica tolerances are much closer and getting things apart AND back together is harder than with the copies. I think the same applies to the Japanese Canons, Leotaxes and Niccas -- much closer tolerances than the Soviet stuff. Most people I know who work on FSU gear send their Leicas out for repair of CLA
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-27-2005   #3
phototone
Registered User
 
phototone is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Van Buren, Arkansas USA
Age: 66
Posts: 723
Nonsense, these Leica cameras are easy. Just work in a tray, so the "leetle screws" don't go missing.
__________________
PHOTOTONE


MY RFF GALLERY
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-27-2005   #4
pshinkaw
Trying to get it right
 
pshinkaw's Avatar
 
pshinkaw is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,342
If you place your work on top of a towel, and put the towel in a tray, those little screws won't bouce up and onto the floor as easily. I suggest a white towel too.

-Paul
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=117'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-27-2005   #5
kabkos
Registered User
 
kabkos is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 67
The IIIF is easy to work on. Assuming that the shutter tensions are good and the problem is a dirty slowspeed escapement. Remove the 4 chrome screws where the top comes down to the sides, remove the 2 black screws one on each side of the lens flange, remove the bottom chrome cover (this is the cover you remove in order to load the camera with film). Push up on the bottom of the camera innards as you hold the outer shell and the innards will come out. Note that the pressure plate is now free and there are 2 springs underneath it, don't loose them. Remove the 4 screws in the lens flange, watch out for shims and note there locations. Remove the 4 screws under the lens flange (these hold the baffles in place). Remove 2 screw on the left, one by the slow speed dial and the other just a little below the slow speed dial, remove 2 screws on the right. Now the plate the slowspeed dial is mounted on can be lifted and slid down, make sure the rangefinder follower is pushed in so the plate can clear. Now you can see the slow speed escapement at the bottom, flush clean it with lighter fluid and dry with compressed air. When installing the plate with the slow speed dial, set the dial to "T", note the lever that rides on a side lobe cam on the slow speed (backside of plate), makesure the lever is rubbing against the cam, slide plate on (remember to push rangefinder follower in) and there is a little window at the bottom left of the plate where you can see the bottom end of the lever mentioned above, well the end of the lever needs to go towards the right so that it catches into the escapement control bracket (I use a small needle to push the lever to the right), when it is in the correct position the plate will drop down into correct position. Reinstall screws into plate and baffles. Now you can cock the shutter and test the slow speed (yes you are doing it out of the camera body, this is safe to do). If everything is workign correctly then finish reassembly.

If the slow speeds are way off, then you might have the dial out of adjustment or the shutter curtain tension is off. The worm drive screw closest to the front of the camera (under the bottom plate at the bottom of the camera, held in place by 1 large head screw and 2 tiny screws).is the second curtain adjustment. The tension is set so that the slow speed at 1 second is correct. Now check the high speed setting by looking at the film gate against a bright light and firing the shutter. If you don't see a full frame, increase the tension on the worm gear at the back of the camera. Adjust until you have a full frame at high speeds, it helps to use a business card to block one side of the film gate and fire the shutter to see light and then perform the same on the other side. Sometimes the highest speeds are not attainable until the camera has been completely cleaned.

If the dial is out of adjustment, remove the set screw in the slow speed knob and unscrew the knob, loosen the screw underneath and you will see a collar with screwdriver notches in it, counter clockwise pulls the slow speed cam out which decreases the time setting. Adjust the knob so that "T" disengages when the dial is set to "1".
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-27-2005   #6
john neal
fallor ergo sum
 
john neal's Avatar
 
john neal is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Albion
Posts: 1,685
Kabkos,

Many thanks for the words that go with the sketches on the Oleson site.

I screwed up the courage last night and did the job. As you predicted, the escapement was gummed up and needed the Ronsonol treatment.

All went well and I now have a set of working slow speeds again - the 1 sec setting is maybe a shade long, but I won't be hand-holding at that speed and it may provide a little reciprocity correction ;-)

Having done the job, I would say that the IIIf is actually quite easy to work on and the better fit and finish helps as you have to get it back right for things to work - the only problem I had was getting the vertical lever back into the escapement rod correctly (eyesight problem).

Thanks to the others who replied for thier thoughts too.

I think the next job is to figure out how to improve the contrast in the rf window without investing in a new mirror

Can't wait to screw a lens on and try this one out!

Regards
John
__________________
Regards,

John
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LEICA MP, a new tool for professional and dedicated amateur photographers MP Guy Leica M Film Cameras 32 01-04-2016 06:21
Leica Digilux 2 MP Guy Rangefinder Photography Discussion 12 08-18-2007 19:35
LEICA DIGITAL-MODUL-R in preparation MP Guy Off Topic 4 05-15-2006 08:13
OK to keep shooting Leica IIIf with slow speeds off BillG Rangefinder Photography Discussion 8 10-29-2004 11:25
Leica SLR digital camera MP Guy Rangefinder Photography Discussion 0 10-02-2003 14:26



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:46.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.