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Photogs / Photo Exhibits This is the place to discuss a particular Photographer (work, style, life, whatever), as well as to post Gallery and Museum Photo Exhibitions and your own impressions of them. As we march on in this new digital world, it is often too easy to forget about the visual importance of the photographic print, as well as their financial importance to the photographer. It is also interesting to remember that some guy named Gene Smith shot with lenses that many lens test reading "never had a picture published in their life" amateurs would turn up their their noses at, as being "unacceptable."

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17-year old Stanley Kubrick photographing New York
Old 03-30-2019   #1
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17-year old Stanley Kubrick photographing New York

Enjoy!


https://www.demilked.com/old-photos-...kPSr8xO4Did9bk
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Old 03-30-2019   #2
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He could have joined Magnum in a heartbeat.


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Old 03-30-2019   #3
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Thanks for the link.

Interesting to see how people dressed, ladies hair styles and how folks lived back then. The young lady carrying a pile of books, must of been an exception as from my Moms generation they were homemakers. Kind of looks like some of the movies I watch on TCM.
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Old 03-30-2019   #4
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those are just great great photos...
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Old 03-30-2019   #5
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It gives a glimpse of a world that no longer exists.
I liked them a lot.
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Old 03-30-2019   #6
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What great photography. And from a 17 year old. Amazing.

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Old 03-30-2019   #7
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As good as HCB and GW. Some of them.
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Old 03-30-2019   #8
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Soooooo GOOD.... Sublime !
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Old 03-30-2019   #9
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Truly a Prodigy.

A prodigy is someone who is so naturally talented at something that they become a master of that particular skill as a child––you can be a musical prodigy or a math prodigy.
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Old 03-30-2019   #10
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Fantastic - thanks for sharing
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Old 03-30-2019   #11
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Great link - I love those shots
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Old 03-30-2019   #12
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These are great, although I've seen some of them before. The guy in the suit in the "High Wire Act" photo looks like a young Richard Nixon. Maybe it was. Nixon practiced law in NYC at one time.
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Old 03-30-2019   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nokton48 View Post
Truly a Prodigy.

A prodigy is someone who is so naturally talented at something that they become a master of that particular skill as a child––you can be a musical prodigy or a math prodigy.
I actually kind of have mixed feelings about Kubrik as a Director. I recognize his genius but he perhaps made some movies that were not quite my style. Nevertheless, some of his films were just fabulous (Barry Lyndon comes to mind, as does his early anti war movie Paths of Glory ) but others, for all the hype about them, are only so so or at least have not stood the test of time so well IMHO. And The Shining stands out for me as being just about the world's most unscary, un-frightening horror movie of all time and so has to be one of his misses as I score it. (But perhaps the fault lies more with Steven King as author - it's hard to polish a "you know what".) What Kubrik really must be lauded for at least though, I think, is his willingness to try just about any genre. And I certainly do not knock him for that, nor for his willingness to go to the "nth degree" to recreate detail and period feel. My love of Barry Lyndon is mostly about that - even for example making period accurate military uniforms (hundreds and hundreds of them) using authentic patterns and period accurate color dyes to get the right color. Name another Director who goes to such lengths.

His early photography was excellent and especially in this I agree, he was a kind of prodigy.
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Old 03-30-2019   #14
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I actually kind of have mixed feelings about Kubrik as a Director. Some of his films were just fabulous (Barry Lyndon comes to mind, as does his early anti war movie Paths of Glory ) but others, for all the hype about them, are only so so or at least have not stood the test of time so well IMHO. And The Shining stands out for me as being just about the world's most unscary horror movie of all time and so has to be one of his misses as I score it. (But perhaps the fault lies more with Steven King as author - it's hard to polish a "you know what".) What Kubrik really must be lauded for at least though, I think, is his willingness to try just about any genre. And I certainly do not knock him for that.

His early photography was excellent and especially in this he was a kind of prodigy.

I have all of his films on DVD. Not all hit the mark, but IMHO (except for the first one) each masterfully well done. BTW he hated the first one.
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Old 03-30-2019   #15
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I have all of his films on DVD. Not all hit the mark, but IMHO (except for the first one) each masterfully well done. BTW he hated the first one.
".......each masterfully well done" Yes I think I would give him that.
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Old 03-30-2019   #16
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Just fantastic. Thank you. If you search “Kubrick and lenses” on YouTube, there is some great stuff about his camera and lens collection, how he used and modified his cinema lenses and lit his scenes to create the effects in films like Barry Lyndon and Eyes Wide Shut. It’s really interesting.
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Old 03-30-2019   #17
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Here Kubrick's daughter shows off the famous F0.7 Barry Lyndon lens

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVF1zoyQJHY
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Old 03-30-2019   #18
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I have always been a Kubrick fan those photos are great!

These days I prefer Orson Welles films or even simpler Chris Carter's X-Files lol.

Chuckled a little at how she handled that lens! Could it really be that heavy?

Edit: If you have not seen "The Other Side of the Wind" -Orson Welles, its on Netflix and worth the time! Released in 2018 after some 40 odd years in the closet.
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Old 03-30-2019   #19
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#13 Laboratory At Columbia University, reminds me Dr. Strangelove.
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Old 03-30-2019   #20
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Very cool

#27 seems staged though.
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Old 03-30-2019   #21
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Very cool

#27 seems staged though.



Just #27? I'd say there are many that are staged. He moved on to a medium where he could better express himself!
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Old 03-30-2019   #22
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The Shining wasn't really intended as a "Horror Film" it was a "Psychological Thriller".

If you haven't seen this breakdown of the film, I'd heavily suggest it.

http://www.curtislibrary.com/2016/04...s-the-shining/

Quote:
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I actually kind of have mixed feelings about Kubrik as a Director. I recognize his genius but he perhaps made some movies that were not quite my style. Nevertheless, some of his films were just fabulous (Barry Lyndon comes to mind, as does his early anti war movie Paths of Glory ) but others, for all the hype about them, are only so so or at least have not stood the test of time so well IMHO. And The Shining stands out for me as being just about the world's most unscary, un-frightening horror movie of all time and so has to be one of his misses as I score it. (But perhaps the fault lies more with Steven King as author - it's hard to polish a "you know what".) What Kubrik really must be lauded for at least though, I think, is his willingness to try just about any genre. And I certainly do not knock him for that, nor for his willingness to go to the "nth degree" to recreate detail and period feel. My love of Barry Lyndon is mostly about that - even for example making period accurate military uniforms (hundreds and hundreds of them) using authentic patterns and period accurate color dyes to get the right color. Name another Director who goes to such lengths.

His early photography was excellent and especially in this I agree, he was a kind of prodigy.
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Old 03-31-2019   #23
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These were shown at the Museum of the City of New York late last year in a major show they put on called "Through a Different Lens".

https://variety.com/2018/film/news/s...os-1202741533/

It was lovely seeing the (obviously modern) prints, some about three feet high/ wide. Most were shot while he was a staff photographer for Look magazine, which he joined at age 17. The stories that he and Look pursued, and his work on them, are fascinating.

There is a book that accompanied the show:

https://shop.mcny.org/collections/bo...ck-photographs
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Old 03-31-2019   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by filmtwit View Post
The Shining wasn't really intended as a "Horror Film" it was a "Psychological Thriller".

If you haven't seen this breakdown of the film, I'd heavily suggest it.

http://www.curtislibrary.com/2016/04...s-the-shining/
Nah - That's splitting hairs mate. Problem is I did not find it thrilling either. Sorry.

Watching movies, especially horror movies (or thrillers) relies on "willing suspension of disbelief" which is key to the enjoyment of those movies. But there are limits to how much disbelief I can actually suspend. And poor filmic devices like tidal waves of blood gushing down a hallway don't help much either. (And neither did Jack Nicholson leering through a door and intoning "Honey I'm Home" in his best insane voice).

In short whether its a thriller or a horror movie it just left me cold. Of course if others feel differently about this film or others in his portfolio I have no problem with that - everyone is entitled to their own view and own sense of what appeals to them and does not.
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Old 03-31-2019   #25
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His still photography is so interesting. Kubrick is the only director to come close to getting Marine Corps boot camp right (Full Metal Jacket) and 2001 is a masterpiece. Thanks for the link.
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Old 03-31-2019   #26
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What’s especially interesting to me about these photos is just how many of them, apart from period clothing, could have been taken yesterday. The daily existence in NYC, something I live all the time, is largely unchanged since then.
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Old 07-29-2019   #27
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What camera is Kubrick holding here?

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Old 07-29-2019   #28
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What camera is Kubrick holding here?

Just a guess but maybe some type of Polaroid camera?
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Old 07-29-2019   #29
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It has got to be probably, looking at the size
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Old 07-29-2019   #30
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Just a guess but maybe some type of Polaroid camera?
I think it is Polaroid Pathfinder 110. I have one converted to take pack film.
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Old 07-29-2019   #31
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I wonder whether I might be permitted to offer a dissenting opinion, without the objective of stepping on toes or taking away from SK's legacy as an artist. SK achieved more than any of us could hope to achieve with his art.

I think the value in these photographs is less as photographs, per se, and more as historical documents of New York City life -- valuable, to be sure; but may I venture to propose that the photographs are not in themselves anything special. If you were to swap the clothing, the buildings, all of the aesthetic markers of their era for markers of our own era, I might humbly suggest that responses to them would be much less enthusiastic. One may see the same sorts of photographs in any number of Flickr streams.
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Old 07-29-2019   #32
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Those NYC images are really striking. Personally, I don't care if they are staged, they are useful as a snap of the past nonetheless. Kind of like using 1940's film as a history of how folks spoke and dressed in the first half of last century. It is idealized, yes, but also true in a way.

I run hot and cold on Kubrick as a film director. I liked The Shining quite a bit, and I don't like horror movies (or novels) as a general rule. I heard a story that he made The Shining because he was trying to show Hollywood that he could do commercial work after Barry Lyndon (with regard to which I always thought the joke was on the audience). Stephen King reportedly hated the movie rendition of his novel, which makes sense as it is really Kuberik's vision, not King's. The book is about writer's block. The movie is a haunted house story. And so it goes.

There is a saying in Hollywood that to authors, they say that film-making is a collaborative process, when what they really should say is, "Film-making is a collaborative process. Bend over."

To return the NYC pictures for a moment. Do you all have the sense that these are taken with a press camera, like a Speed Graphic? In 1948, that would have been about right. If so, it makes the pictures more accomplished as there is no motor drive to help get the perfect moment - you have to chose your instant. I'd love to see the contact sheets. I also thought, looking at all those subway commuters reading their morning papers, that nothing has changed much. It is just that today, it's cell phones. Plus ca change in the Big City.
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Old 07-29-2019   #33
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“I think aesthetically recording spontaneous action, rather than carefully posing a picture, is the most valid and expressive use of photography.”

I've always thought that was the way to go. Operating on your instincts is almost always going to trump a carefully reasoned out shot, assuming that you know what you're doing . Kubrick was a phenomenally talented director, photographer and cinematographer. When you read how 2001: A Space Odyssey was made, it's clearly apparent that no one but Kubrick could have made that movie. He was a genius with a great eye.

Having said that, those shots on the link here were obviously posed, ala many of Bresson's shots! It's important to remember that even a "valid and expressive use of photography" is still a photograph. It's always going to be just what it is, an illusion, a simulacrum of what is really there.
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Old 07-29-2019   #34
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His still photography is so interesting. Kubrick is the only director to come close to getting Marine Corps boot camp right (Full Metal Jacket) and 2001 is a masterpiece. Thanks for the link.

Very talented still photographer, genius film maker.



Kubrick showed his genius in FMJ by being able to convince the watcher that a disused town gas works in East London (UK) was actually Vietnam. One of my favourite films.
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Old 07-30-2019   #35
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I wonder whether I might be permitted to offer a dissenting opinion, without the objective of stepping on toes or taking away from SK's legacy as an artist. SK achieved more than any of us could hope to achieve with his art.

I think the value in these photographs is less as photographs, per se, and more as historical documents of New York City life -- valuable, to be sure; but may I venture to propose that the photographs are not in themselves anything special. If you were to swap the clothing, the buildings, all of the aesthetic markers of their era for markers of our own era, I might humbly suggest that responses to them would be much less enthusiastic. One may see the same sorts of photographs in any number of Flickr streams.

I agree and disagree; yes, we can see a lot of these kinds of images in today's flickr streams. Heck, I've taken similar modern images. And it's also important to remember context. Today's world gives us access to a huge range of photographic examples. We can see the best photography at the click of a mouse or swipe of a finger, and we can take images just as easily. We can even 'develop' images using filters and apps in our phones.


In the 40s, photography was expensive and cumbersome, and exemplars of the craft were far fewer in number, and much less available. Kubrick was 17 in the early 40s and was producing work that stood on the shoulders of the giants of that time.
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Old 07-30-2019   #36
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I agree and disagree; yes, we can see a lot of these kinds of images in today's flickr streams. Heck, I've taken similar modern images. And it's also important to remember context. Today's world gives us access to a huge range of photographic examples. We can see the best photography at the click of a mouse or swipe of a finger, and we can take images just as easily. We can even 'develop' images using filters and apps in our phones.


In the 40s, photography was expensive and cumbersome, and exemplars of the craft were far fewer in number, and much less available. Kubrick was 17 in the early 40s and was producing work that stood on the shoulders of the giants of that time.
The fact that it was Kubrick and he was 17 makes the photographs special. But the photographs in and of themselves are not particularly remarkable. If I came across some old negatives and scanned them and these were the images that popped up on my screen, and I didn’t know they were Kubrick, I would file them away as 1940s photographic ephemera. As a glimpse into the young photographic mind of a would-be genius, yes, of course they are interesting; but only with a view to the entire oeuvre.

EDIT:

I should also say that Kubrick's films were proffered well before my time and I acknowledge the very real potential of my not "getting it".
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Old 07-30-2019   #37
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Stanley Kubrick is my all time favorite director. Thanks for sharing this. Very interesting to watch.

By the way, “When a man cannot choose he ceases to be a man...” is a quote from his movie, A Clockwork Orange.
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Old 07-30-2019   #38
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I wonder whether I might be permitted to offer a dissenting opinion, without the objective of stepping on toes or taking away from SK's legacy as an artist. SK achieved more than any of us could hope to achieve with his art.

I think the value in these photographs is less as photographs, per se, and more as historical documents of New York City life -- valuable, to be sure; but may I venture to propose that the photographs are not in themselves anything special. If you were to swap the clothing, the buildings, all of the aesthetic markers of their era for markers of our own era, I might humbly suggest that responses to them would be much less enthusiastic. One may see the same sorts of photographs in any number of Flickr streams.
It’s easy to find similar subjects photographed today - any decent photographer can take a photo of this or that in the middle of the frame - but they aren’t art for the most part, so I’d say it is hard to find the same sorts of photos on Flickr. The skill in this type of photography isn’t about documentation so much as it is in the compositions of different often superimposed graphic elements (it’s not about just content but rather form, to quote Sontag) and one doesn’t see that skill in all that many Flickr streams. His street photography isn’t as sophisticated and vital in this sense as Winogrand’s or Meyerowitz’s, but it is well above average.
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Old 07-30-2019   #39
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The pics range from 1940 until 1949. 17? Please explain. Thanks.
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