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SLRs - the unRF For those of you who must talk about SLRs, if only to confirm they are not RF.

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Old 02-20-2019   #41
alexandru_voicu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiff View Post
Hi Alex, just a further addition:
I can highly recommend using the MB-40 vertical grip with the F6.
Because you get
- improved ergonomics
- perfect handling for shots in vertical orientation (e.g. portraits)
- the possibility to use both the original Nikon rechargeable battery and AA cells (normal and rechargeable); that is a huge advantage! I use Panasonic eneloop rechargeable AA cells in my F6, and it works perfectly: I get 35 - 50 rolls per charge
- 8 fps.
Hey Skiff,

Thank you for the piece of advice. Sure, I will get the MB-40. I like the fact that I can use rechargeable NiMH batteries. Right now I'm communicating with two local stores.

Regards,
Alex
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Old 02-20-2019   #42
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Originally Posted by Skiff View Post
+1.

For example when the Nikon F3 was introduced, most professionals were rather sceptical because of the electronics. But in a few years the F3 has proven its reliability and now it belongs to the most legendary cameras.
But oh, it does have a weak-point. Underneath that weird hot shoe on top of the rewind knob is a wafer-thin glass resister plate. I cracked that twice when banging a mounted flash that stressed the assembly. Once that glass plate is cracked, the metering system is shot and the camera will only shoot at the mechanical 1/80 second shutter speed. I purchased the resister plate from Nikon twice during the 90's, $25 each time, and had the Nikon authorized repair shop here in Dallas repair it.

To my knowledge, that $25 resister plate is no longer being manufactured and I would imagine there will start to be F3's with un-repairable resister plates all over the place one day soon. I actually thought at one point about buying several of them from Nikon to sell at some point but never followed through.

Today, 10 times out of 10, I'd rather buy a nice F2AS.
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Old 02-20-2019   #43
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Originally Posted by Gregm61 View Post
But oh, it does have a weak-point. Underneath that weird hot shoe on top of the rewind knob is a wafer-thin glass resister plate. I cracked that twice when banging a mounted flash that stressed the assembly. Once that glass plate is cracked, the metering system is shot and the camera will only shoot at the mechanical 1/80 second shutter speed. I purchased the resister plate from Nikon twice during the 90's, $25 each time, and had the Nikon authorized repair shop here in Dallas repair it.

To my knowledge, that $25 resister plate is no longer being manufactured and I would imagine there will start to be F3's with un-repairable resister plates all over the place one day soon.
Maybe that will happen, maybe not. We will see.
But even if that happens in the coming years, than the F3 will have served for more than 40 years. Someone who bought one new in 1980, which then maybe get defunct in 2023, have had made a really great purchase!
Have you ever had a car which lasted so long for you?

If someone buys a brand new F6 today, which then maybe fail 40 years later, will also have made an outstanding purchase with excellent price-performance ratio.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregm61 View Post
Today, 10 times out of 10, I'd rather buy a nice F2AS.
I won't. Every F2 today is very old with lots of shutter counts / "mileage". And I don't know how much it was abused by the pre-owners. The likeliness that its get defunct in the next years is much higher than that a brand new F6 gets problems.
But, even much more important to me:
The F2 limits my photographic possibilities. With the F6 I can do so much more, it offers so much more possibilities and creativity to me that it is a no brainer for me.
There is a reason why my most used Nikon is the F6, and my old mechanical Nikons are mostly staying in the cupboard.
The F6 does not limit me.
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Old 02-20-2019   #44
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Hi everyone,

Just a quick update. Today I ordered the F6 and the MB-40 from a local dealer. In two weeks to one month, I shall be the proud owner. I wonder what serial number will I get... Above 40000 or below?

I'll let you know when it arrives.

Once again, thank you for your support.

Regards,
Alex
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Old 02-20-2019   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru_voicu View Post
Hi everyone,

Just a quick update. Today I ordered the F6 and the MB-40 from a local dealer. In two weeks to one month, I shall be the proud owner. I wonder what serial number will I get... Above 40000 or below?

I'll let you know when it arrives.

Once again, thank you for your support.

Regards,
Alex
Congrats on the new camera. May the time to wait blow by quickly and you shoot a lot of film. What lens will be attaching to this beaut?
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Old 02-20-2019   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregm61 View Post
I cracked that twice when banging a mounted flash that stressed the assembly. Once that glass plate is cracked, the metering system is shot and the camera will only shoot at the mechanical 1/80 second shutter speed. I purchased the resister plate from Nikon twice during the 90's, $25 each time, and had the Nikon authorized repair shop here in Dallas repair it.

To my knowledge, that $25 resister plate is no longer being manufactured and I would imagine there will start to be F3's with unrepairable resister plates all over the place one day soon.
On the other side of the coin, though, I might imagine that most people shooting an F3 nowadays are doing so without using flash, so hopefully impact damage caused by bumping the flash slows to only a tiny trickle.
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Old 02-20-2019   #47
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mmm I've long thought of the fun lenses to shoot on an F6....AF-S 200mm f/2....58mm f/1.4....
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Old 02-20-2019   #48
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Congrats on the new camera. May the time to wait blow by quickly and you shoot a lot of film. What lens will be attaching to this beaut?
Ted, I guess I'll be the laughing stock of this forum, but I have to face it: I have no lenses in F mount. I have several in M mount, but no F mount... So... I don't know. I'll probably start with 35 or a 50 and then go longer. For wide angle, I shall use my M6 with the Zeiss 25/2.8.

Thank you for your kind words!
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Old 02-20-2019   #49
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Originally Posted by alexandru_voicu View Post
Ted, I guess I'll be the laughing stock of this forum, but I have to face it: I have no lenses in F mount. I have several in M mount, but no F mount... So... I don't know. I'll probably start with 35 or a 50 and then go longer. For wide angle, I shall use my M6 with the Zeiss 25/2.8.

Thank you for your kind words!
I have to admit, that's pretty funny. Well, have fun shopping for a new lens.
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Old 02-20-2019   #50
Ko.Fe.
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I understand very well why Alex want new camera.
Many people prefer new. And not only cameras.
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Old 02-20-2019   #51
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Originally Posted by alexandru_voicu View Post
Hi everyone,

Just a quick update. Today I ordered the F6 and the MB-40 from a local dealer. In two weeks to one month, I shall be the proud owner. I wonder what serial number will I get... Above 40000 or below?

I'll let you know when it arrives.

Once again, thank you for your support.

Regards,
Alex
Hi Alex,
congratulations! I wish you lots of fun with your new F6!
Concerning serial number:
The latest reported serial numbers 2-3 months ago were in the 0035636 - 0035650 range, if I remember right (have a look at the F6 serial numbers thread in this subforum ).
Concerning lens:
A good starter would be the current Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50G. A very solid performer at a very attractive price, with an excellent price-performance ratio.
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Old 02-20-2019   #52
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Alex, congratulations on the F6. I also buy only new because I was disappointed that the 80 - 200mm f2.8 AF-S lens that I loved after buying it used could not be repaired. I decided on a new 70 - 200mm lens rather than another used 80 - 200mm. I want it to be reliable and repairable as long as possible.

The Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50 is almost a legendary lens along with being small and inexpensive. However, I think you should decide what your final set of lenses would be and buy one of the lenses on that list. It depends on what focal lengths and apertures you actually use. I would never use a 50mm lens. But an 85mm f1.4 will always be in my set.
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Old 02-20-2019   #53
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Congrats on the F6 purchase!
You have bought the best AF 35mm film camera ever made, so buy the best AF lenses for it - I use the Sigma Art 50 and 35 1.4 lenses. They work perfectly.
For light weight I sometimes use the 50 1.8G Nikon lens.
For zoom, I use the Nikon 24-120 G VR lens (latest version). And a whole bunch of manual focus glass.
The light meter on the F6 is biased for slide film, i.e. it leans to underexposure so as not to lose highlights. When I shoot colour negative film, I set it for 1/2 stop over exposure.
I also set the AE hold mode so that when you use the AE lock it holds it for as many exposures as you want until you actively release it, or turn the camera off. Default mode is to release the AE hold after one exposure. I also use the AF on button to activate AF, not the shutter button.

re. reliabilty, my perfect condition never dinged, never dropped F6 had the AF fail. Just stopped focusing accurately, kept on front focusing by several feet. Nikon USA (in Los Angeles) repaired it in a few days (are you listening Leica?!) for $250. They said this has happened on a few of them and was a defective rf module (their words).
So nothing is faultless.
re. the F3 with the cracking meter circuit, that's why I use the F3P and Limited models. They are made much stronger out of titanium and have the hot shoe on the prism. Ever notice so many regular F3s have dented prisms? That's because they are made out of very thin metal while the P versions are not.
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Old 02-20-2019   #54
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I can recommend buying new Nikon film cameras - I got my FE brand new in 1982 and it's still working perfectly. I hope you get at least 27 years use out of your F6.
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Old 02-20-2019   #55
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Digression here... I am really disappointed that the new 58 0.95 Nikon Noct lens is made in the Z mount. I wish it was in the F mount (which can be adapted to the Z) so I could use it on my F6.
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Old 02-20-2019   #56
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Hi everyone,

Again, thank you so much for your suggestions. I certainly do have to buy my first F mount lens, but I haven't yet decided which one. And, after the expensive purchase, it will be really hard to find the funds for a lens. All I know is that I want autofocus, not a manual lens. For manual, I have my M mount lenses. And probably I want primes, as I'm used to having fast glass and it would be hard to go back to F2.8 lenses. We'll see. I don't want to buy the lens before receiving the camera, just in case anything happens and my order for the F6 is canceled. Also, I can borrow F mount lenses from friends.

Regards,
Alex
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Old 02-21-2019   #57
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Originally Posted by Austerby View Post
I can recommend buying new Nikon film cameras - I got my FE brand new in 1982 and it's still working perfectly. I hope you get at least 27 years use out of your F6.
You are the exact reason why I always recommend people buy Nikon cameras second hand. They are so well built that they last decades. My Nikon FM2n is an early model and just keeps on truckin' year after year after year. It shows no signs of slowing down. Buying second hand, especially in the case of the F6, allows for a massive savings of money. Now we learned that the OP has no F mount lenses and not much funds for a lens. A second hand F6 would have allowed for 1-2 lenses, with no discernible drop in quality for the camera. Well, everyone makes the choices that they are comfortable with.
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Old 02-21-2019   #58
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Well, everyone makes the choices that they are comfortable with.
The situation is like this: if I had bought a second hand F6, I would have still found it very difficult to buy lenses. Why is that? Because I bought the new F6 in 12 installments. Which means that it's actually easier for me to buy new than second hand. Buying second hand would have put me even in a more difficult situation for a couple of months simply because I would have forced to put on the table a much larger sum at once.

And, speaking of lenses, should I get the G lenses? Coming from the world of rangefinders, having a lens without an aperture ring is nothing short of an abomination. I'm sure this topic has been discussed to death, but I still want to hear a few opinions on the matter.

Regards,
Alex
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Old 02-21-2019   #59
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Alex get the 50 1.8g as your first lens. It is excellent, light, focuses very fast and accurately and is cheap. especially used .... And looks and balances great on the F6.
The previous model (still made) 50 1.8d is also excellent and even cheaper.
Forget about wanting an aperture ring with the AF lenses. I was like that too until I tried those lenses. The aperture dials on Nikon’s AF lenses (that I tried) are horrible and plasticky feeling with lots of stick. Not smooth, precise and beautiful like on the AIS lenses.
After I used it once I just used the camera body to control the aperture.
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Old 02-21-2019   #60
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Alex get the 50 1.8g as your first lens. It is excellent, light, focuses very fast and accurately and is cheap. especially used .... And looks and balances great on the F6.
The previous model (still made) 50 1.8d is also excellent and even cheaper.
Forget about wanting an aperture ring with the AF lenses. I was like that too until I tried those lenses. The aperture dials on Nikon’s AF lenses (that I tried) are horrible and plasticky feeling with lots of stick. Not smooth, precise and beautiful like on the AIS lenses.
After I used it once I just used the camera body to control the aperture.
Thank you for the advice. Surely, the 50/1.8 is on the short list. But so is the 50/1.4. Still hard to digest the idea that no aperture ring is better than aperture ring.
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Old 02-21-2019   #61
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Nah. I have M lenses. But my SLR lenses have no aperture rings. Instead it is wheel on the camera. No significant difference.
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Old 02-21-2019   #62
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Originally Posted by alexandru_voicu View Post
The situation is like this: if I had bought a second hand F6, I would have still found it very difficult to buy lenses. Why is that? Because I bought the new F6 in 12 installments. Which means that it's actually easier for me to buy new than second hand. Buying second hand would have put me even in a more difficult situation for a couple of months simply because I would have forced to put on the table a much larger sum at once.


And, speaking of lenses, should I get the G lenses? Coming from the world rangefinders, having a lens without an aperture ring is nothing short of a abomination. I'm sure this topic has been discussed to death, but I still want to hear a few opinions on the matter.


Regards,
Alex
I agree with Huss. The F6 really shines with fully automatic lenses. I would not worry about aperture rings with a camera like this. Get whatever G lens you can afford.
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Old 02-21-2019   #63
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Thank you for the advice. Surely, the 50/1.8 is on the short list. But so is the 50/1.4. Still hard to digest the idea that no aperture ring is better than aperture ring.
When i bought my 1.8g I spent waay too much time researching it vs the 1.4g and the consensus is/was the 1.8 is better.
Sharper, flares less, focuses better, cheaper.
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Old 02-23-2019   #64
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I agree with Huss. The F6 really shines with fully automatic lenses.
The F6 shines with several different lens types, that is one of its numerous strengths:
AI and AI-S (with even matrix metering), AI-P, AF, AF-D, AF-S, VR and G type lenses.
The F6 can even be modified to use pre-AI lenses.
The only limitation is E-type lenses, which can only be used with full open aperture.

To the OP: If you don't have any older Nikon film bodies which need an aperture ring, you will not have any problem with buying a G type lens like the current Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50 G.
Advantage of the AF-D lenses with aperture ring is that
- they can be used on older Nikon film bodies as well
- the aperture can also be used with 1/3 stops via the aperture command dial (like the G lenses).

Here you find test reviews about Nikon lenses:
- https://www.opticallimits.com/
- https://www.lenstip.com/
- http://www.photodo.com/
- http://bythom.com/camera-lens-and-ac...l#.XHE1oaBCcdU
- https://www.ephotozine.com/iamnikon/reviews
- http://www.naturfotograf.com/index2.html
- http://nikongear.net/revival/
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Old 02-23-2019   #65
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Originally Posted by Huss View Post
Forget about wanting an aperture ring with the AF lenses. I was like that too until I tried those lenses. The aperture dials on Nikonís AF lenses (that I tried) are horrible and plasticky feeling with lots of stick. Not smooth, precise and beautiful like on the AIS lenses.
After I used it once I just used the camera body to control the aperture.
I have to disagree here: I don't have any problems with the 24-50 AF-D, 28-70 AF-D, the 28-70 AF-S, the 28-105 AF-D, the 1.8/50 AF-D, the 1.8/85 AF-D, the 2/105 AF-D and 4/300 AF-S.
With all these lenses I can even set the aperture ring at 1/3 stops difference manually.
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Old 02-23-2019   #66
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Originally Posted by View Range View Post
.
[.....]
The Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50 is almost a legendary lens along with being small and inexpensive.
I had both this and the older 50 f1.8 D. The newer AF-S is improved when shot at wide aperture (f/1.8 - f/3.5) and is dead quiet but on my F5 it had the tendency to "double check" for focus in low light conditions. Never had this problem with the older "D" version. This, together with the fact that it is a bulkier lens made me sell it and kept the older "D". Never missed it, never looked back.
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Old 02-23-2019   #67
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The light meter on the F6 is biased for slide film, i.e. it leans to underexposure so as not to lose highlights. When I shoot colour negative film, I set it for 1/2 stop over exposure.
I cannot confirm from my experience (more than a decade using F6 with hundreds of shot rolls) that the F6 light meter generally leans to under exposure. The light meter in 3D-color-matrix mode is extremely precise. Perfect results in about 99% of all cases. In the rest 1% it is only 1/3 or max. 2/3 stops away from perfect exposure. So even with reversal film in these rare cases you get good to usable results.
In very strong backlight situations exposing can be a bit on the underexposed side (typical for all internal object light meters). In such situations bracketing with exposures to the plus + side is helpful.
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Old 02-23-2019   #68
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I had both this and the older 50 f1.8 D. The newer AF-S is improved when shot at wide aperture (f/1.8 - f/3.5) and is dead quiet but on my F5 it had the tendency to "double check" for focus in low light conditions. Never had this problem with the older "D" version. This, together with the fact that it is a bulkier lens made me sell it and kept the older "D". Never missed it, never looked back.
I have both, the older 1.8/50 AF-D and the current AF-S 1.8/50 G.
I can confirm that the newer is sharper in the f1.8 - f3.5 range. Both in the centre and at the corners.
I have not any AF problems with the newer one. Neither on the F5 nor on the F6.
We have to consider that sample variation can lead to different results from different users.

In a side by side comparison of the AF-D 1.8/50 to the AF-S 1.8/50 I've got the following results:
Advantages of the AF-S:
- better sharpness and contrast in the f1.8 - f3.5 range in the centre and the corners
- less flares
- AF-S allows to override AF manually at every time
- silent AF (not important for me personally)

Disadvantages of the AF-S:
- a bit more distortion (but not problematic)
- slight focus-shift at very narrow distances.

Advantages of the AF-D:
- distortion-free
- no focus shift
- extremely light and compact
- cheaper
- aperture ring allows usage on older film bodies

Disadvantages of the AF-D:
- less sharp and contrasty in the f1.8 -f3.5 range
- no AF override
- more prone to flares than the AF-S type in direct sun
- AF a bit louder (irrelevant for me personally).
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Old 02-23-2019   #69
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I cannot confirm from my experience (more than a decade using F6 with hundreds of shot rolls) that the F6 light meter generally leans to under exposure. The light meter in 3D-color-matrix mode is extremely precise. Perfect results in about 99% of all cases. In the rest 1% it is only 1/3 or max. 2/3 stops away from perfect exposure. So even with reversal film in these rare cases you get good to usable results.
In very strong backlight situations exposing can be a bit on the underexposed side (typical for all internal object light meters). In such situations bracketing with exposures to the plus + side is helpful.
+1.
The 3D-Color-Matrix-Metering of the F6 is by far the best and most precise metering system I've ever used.
And I have dozens of different cameras used.

Cheers, Jan
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Old 02-23-2019   #70
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Hi everyone,

Thank you for sharing your thoughts on the lenses, I shall keep them in mind. It will take some time until the first purchase, because I don't want to buy the lens(es) before the camera arrives. I'll keep you posted.

Did I hear something about focus shift? I must admit, THAT I'm really tired of. I spent ten years of my life trying to compensate for focus shift. I was hoping that Nikkor lenses suffer less from this affliction. If I were a lens designer, my first commandment would be: thou shall not shift.

Regards,
Alex
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Old 02-24-2019   #71
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Did I hear something about focus shift? I must admit, THAT I'm really tired of. I spent ten years of my life trying to compensate for focus shift. I was hoping that Nikkor lenses suffer less from this affliction. If I were a lens designer, my first commandment would be: thou shall not shift.

Regards,
Alex
Alex, I can completely understand your frustration about focus shift. It is indeed an ugly effect. I hate it!
From a physical point of view, generally all lenses have this effect. But it is possible for optical engineers to correct this optical "error" to a degree that it is not visible / significant anymore.
For example Zeiss has corrected their Otus and Milvus lenses in such an excellent way that there is no visible focus shift.

Concerning Nikon: Unfortunately some lenses suffer from focus shift, but other Nikkors don't. The same is valid for the current Sigma "art" lenses.
So you have to look at the specific lens in detail, whether it suffers from focus shift or not.

Concerning current 50mm lenses for Nikon: The Zeiss Milvus 1.4/50, Milvus 2/50 and the Nikkor AF-D 1.8/50 and former AI-S 1.8/50 (long barrel version) fortunately don't suffer from focus shift.
The Sigma Art 1.4/50 and the Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50G do show some focus shift.
But fortunately the Nikkor has only some very low/slight focus shift at very short distances (0.45m - 1m). In most situations you won't have any problems.
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Old 02-24-2019   #72
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But fortunately the Nikkor has only some very low/slight focus shift at very short distances (0.45m - 1m). In most situations you won't have any problems.
Fortunately I have to correct myself in a positive way .
The statement above I've made from my memory. But to be 100% certain I've just made a new focus shift test for you with my DSLR and the Spyder Lens Cal tool, which is perfect for tests of focus shifts.
At 1m there is absolutely no visible focus shift with the Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50G. Even in 100% view no focus shift visible!

There is only some very low/slight focus shift at minimum distance of 0.45m. But you need the 100% view to see it.
So nothing to worry about in daily photography .
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Old 02-24-2019   #73
HHPhoto
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I have both, the older 1.8/50 AF-D and the current AF-S 1.8/50 G.
I can confirm that the newer is sharper in the f1.8 - f3.5 range. Both in the centre and at the corners.
I have not any AF problems with the newer one. Neither on the F5 nor on the F6.
We have to consider that sample variation can lead to different results from different users.

In a side by side comparison of the AF-D 1.8/50 to the AF-S 1.8/50 I've got the following results:
Advantages of the AF-S:
- better sharpness and contrast in the f1.8 - f3.5 range in the centre and the corners
- less flares
- AF-S allows to override AF manually at every time
- silent AF (not important for me personally)

Disadvantages of the AF-S:
- a bit more distortion (but not problematic)
- slight focus-shift at very narrow distances.

Advantages of the AF-D:
- distortion-free
- no focus shift
- extremely light and compact
- cheaper
- aperture ring allows usage on older film bodies

Disadvantages of the AF-D:
- less sharp and contrasty in the f1.8 -f3.5 range
- no AF override
- more prone to flares than the AF-S type in direct sun
- AF a bit louder (irrelevant for me personally).

From my experiences with both lenses I can confirm all of that.
I just want to add some further advantages of the recent Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50G:
+ a bit better bokeh
+ wider manual focus ring
+ rubber ring at the lens mount = better dust and water protection in usage outdoor
+ lens is shipped with hood (a really good one with bajonet) and soft pouch included.

Cheers, Jan
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Old 02-24-2019   #74
alexandru_voicu
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Originally Posted by Skiff View Post
Fortunately I have to correct myself in a positive way .
The statement above I've made from my memory. But to be 100% certain I've just made a new focus shift test for you with my DSLR and the Spyder Lens Cal tool, which is perfect for tests of focus shifts.
At 1m there is absolutely no visible focus shift with the Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50G. Even in 100% view no focus shift visible!

There is only some very low/slight focus shift at minimum distance of 0.45m. But you need the 100% view to see it.
So nothing to worry about in daily photography .
Thank you, Skiff. The lack of focus shift does count for a lot.
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Old 02-24-2019   #75
alexandru_voicu
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Originally Posted by HHPhoto View Post
From my experiences with both lenses I can confirm all of that.
I just want to add some further advantages of the recent Nikkor AF-S 1.8/50G:
+ a bit better bokeh
+ wider manual focus ring
+ rubber ring at the lens mount = better dust and water protection in usage outdoor
+ lens is shipped with hood (a really good one with bajonet) and soft pouch included.

Cheers, Jan
Jan, after reading your post (and Skiff's), I'll go with the 50/1.8. Hard to do that after just getting the Nokton 50/1.2 in M mount, but I have to learn to live with the "puny" F1.8.
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Old 03-15-2019   #76
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Hi everyone,


While still waiting for my F6, I started looking for lenses. My favorite local store has a fantastic discount for the Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8. With that discount, the Tamron is only marginally more expensive than the Nikkor 50/1.8G. However, the SP has VC and some other nice features. Which begs the question: is the Tamron VC (Vibration Compensation) compatible with the F6? And if it's not, should I get the Tamron or the Nikkor 50/1.8G?


Many thanks,
Alex
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Old 03-15-2019   #77
Peter Wijninga
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Hi Alex, You are not the first one asking this question.... https://www.flickr.com/groups/375799...7701024772574/ As for myself, I have the EOS 3 which takes EF lenses of which I have a few. Good luck with your decision.
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Old 03-15-2019   #78
alexandru_voicu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Wijninga View Post
Hi Alex, You are not the first one asking this question.... https://www.flickr.com/groups/375799...7701024772574/ As for myself, I have the EOS 3 which takes EF lenses of which I have a few. Good luck with your decision.

Hi Peter and thank you for the link. I too had founded it when googling for a solution. It seems, however, I cannot find a proper answer.
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Old 03-15-2019   #79
Peter Wijninga
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Hi Alex, just contact BHPhoto on chat and ask them -considering they are selling the F6.
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Old 03-15-2019   #80
james.liam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru_voicu View Post
Hi everyone,


While still waiting for my F6, I started looking for lenses. My favorite local store has a fantastic discount for the Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8. With that discount, the Tamron is only marginally more expensive than the Nikkor 50/1.8G. However, the SP has VC and some other nice features. Which begs the question: is the Tamron VC (Vibration Compensation) compatible with the F6? And if it's not, should I get the Tamron or the Nikkor 50/1.8G?


Many thanks,
Alex
Congratulations on the F6! Can't comment on new Tamron primes (though the zooms are much superior to their older ones).
The Sigma ART series gives you both AF and optics often superior to Nikkor or at minimum, their match at <1/2 the price. Amazing build as well.
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