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Old 07-25-2018   #41
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thank you so much for starting this thread. all the recommendations are a breath of fresh air. now time to start watching all these films!!
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Old 07-26-2018   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silkyfeet View Post
thank you so much for starting this thread. all the recommendations are a breath of fresh air. now time to start watching all these films!!
My apologies to all - having started the thread I have been down with winter flu (or at least man flu) for a few days and have left this thread unattended. But not unloved.

As Silkyfeet says, thanks to all for your contributions and ideas. Though I fancy myself as a film buff I have to admit there are many Directors mentioned here that I know little about (I guess I tend a bit towards Asian cinema - particularly older stuff that does not involve ninjas or Shaolin monks administering karate chops to villains.) Now to start exploring some new options............

A post on this thread mentioned Wes Anderson as being a director who thinks like a stills photographer. Interestingly there are lots of articles and videos comparing his work specifically to Ozu. So I guess that means others think so too.

http://www.mediafactory.org.au/helen...r-and-costume/
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Old 07-27-2018   #43
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Actually I forgot one film in which there is a very direct stills pic feeling. It is called "Carol" stars Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara (in which Mara herself plays a photographer) and is like a walking, talking moving Saul Leiter image. This seems to have been a very deliberate artistic choice by the director who is Todd Hayes, about whom I know very little.

Never the less in this film at least, he aces it.







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Old 07-27-2018   #44
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Great thread... I have seen many of the aforementioned films and directors. Having noticed this connection between the two visual mediums, I spent a few dollars to attend one of director Bruce Block's seminars on Visual Structure. I highly recommend his book The Visual Story. Lots of illustrations and explanations. And really helps one to tie motion pictures and still photography together.
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Old 07-27-2018   #45
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Orson Welles and Polanski
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Old 07-27-2018   #46
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Most of that so called 50mm perspective comes from his theater background. Most everything he wants to show, is like a theater stage and blocked as such.

Kurasawa was once quoted that Ozu films were like watching tea boil. And Ozu responded "I can make fried tofu, boiled tofu, stuffed tofu. Cutlets and fancy stuff, that's for other directors."

I'd add though don't forget Mizuguchi and even Seijun Suzuki, who probobly had a big influence on Daidō Moriyama

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Originally Posted by peterm1 View Post
I am a bit of a film buff and have lots of DVDs of films I have bought over the years. (Too many in fact - how the heck to store them accessably is the problem!)

Like many film buffs I have become interested in foreign movies (well, there are only so many crappy Hollywood comic book based movies one can watch in his life and have any hope of not reverting to the mental age of a 13 year old boy). I recently stumbled on the work of a Japanese director Yasujirō Ozu. Ozu started as a cinematographer in the silent era when cameras were very static (almost no camera movement, no panning and even very few tracking shots) and he carried this style through out his life - even with more modern cameras. As a result he developed a style of camera work very, very like a stills photographer. He shot almost exclusively with a 50mm lens incidentally to keep it "real".

Here is a nice video on him and you will see immediately how so many of his shots look like stills. In fact this is a theme of the video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ra0xEQ8yaU

And another video on how he interspersed his movies with little scenes that often seemed just to have the purpose of making it contemplative and to set the movie in a time and place. You can readily see how many of these are composed as a stills shot. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhQwFxhiVQs

As I posted in the comments section of the first video, at 0.57 seconds into that video, for example, there is a scene with a woman and man in the mid range eating from bowls and in the background a child. He has aligned them diagonally with their bodies broadly describing a line from top left to bottom right and they are framed by the door of the home and the dark interior of the home - all of which add visual interest. It is pretty much exactly how I would aspire to compose the shot if I had a choice. And the same goes for the shot that precedes it at about 0.52 seconds - two people on a seawall fishing framed by the rockwall below them and the two verticals of the lighthouse and the electricity pole. Ozu, unlike almost any other director was about composition of the shot - aiming for beauty. Just like a stills photographer.

I thought I would share these videos (and some others may find Ozu's work interesting though his movies are very quiet and some would say boring though I love them when I am in the right frame of mind - quiet, contemplative etc) but I also thought I would ask - is there anyone else who directs and shoots more or less like this? Ideas?

Kubrik a little, perhaps???
as far as still photography style directors, I'd add Krzysztof Kieślowski. Most of his shots tend to be static, but the composition is astounding and the art direction spot on.
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Old 07-27-2018   #47
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Old 08-02-2018   #48
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Kubrik's "Barry Lyndon" was mentioned here and the same thought occurred to me when I was composing my initial post.

I stumbled on this video about how Kubrik shot the film - much of which I already knew but it is interesting never the less - I have often marvelled at how authentic the film looks.

And of course his use of an ultra fast Zeiss Planar to shoot candle lit scenes is stuff of legend and no doubt known to many here. The two links are firstly, a video about his shooting of the film and second, an article specifically about his various lenses.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOLZMr52Wcc

https://www.patreon.com/posts/lenses-at-in-san-11951942

EDIT: And there is this video on Kubrik and his cameras - many of them stills cameras. I knew he started out as a photographer but it seems he never lost his love for photography. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfNB4YepvTA
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Old 08-03-2018   #49
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UPDATE: Pawlikowskis "Cold war" is even superior to "Ida" when it comes to stills (the story is better too).
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Old 08-03-2018   #50
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Old 08-03-2018   #51
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The films of Abbas Kiarostami (e.g. Taste of Cherry) make extreme use of the visuals, generally using dialog only when necessary for furthering the plot. He's in that lineage the includes Vittorio de Sica (the Bicycle Thief), Ozu and Satyajit Ray (e.g. The Apu Trilogy).

In my case, I found myself going from video and motion picture to still photography and the darkroom. There's something very satisfying for me about creating a print as a physical object.
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Old 08-03-2018   #52
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Check out Phillippe LeSourd's work in Wong Kar Wai's movie The Grandmaster.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BO1yfTfozhk

When I grow up, I want to shoot like that.
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Old 01-11-2019   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by santino View Post
UPDATE: Pawlikowskis "Cold war" is even superior to "Ida" when it comes to stills (the story is better too).
i lost this thread. glad i found it again as so many gems to watch. cold war is due out at the end of jan over in the uk so thanks for letting us know
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Old 01-11-2019   #54
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Ozu has a film about 2 young brothers who want to watch TV and rebel against their strict father.

The film is so stunning visually i left the cinema in a state of shock. I could not say what i exactly saw. It was everything and it was nothing. Shot in color.
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Old 01-11-2019   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colker View Post
Ozu has a film about 2 young brothers who want to watch TV and rebel against their strict father.

The film is so stunning visually i left the cinema in a state of shock. I could not say what i exactly saw. It was everything and it was nothing. Shot in color.
That film ("Good Morning") has such a stunning colour palette. Muted, earthy primary colours. It reminds me somewhat of family photos on Agfa paper from the 70's.
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Old 01-11-2019   #56
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It's like "watching tea boil."

A. Kurosawa

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Yasujirō Ozu’s 1953 movie “Tokyo Story” is the most wonderfully depressing movie I have ever watched - a true masterpiece.

All the best,
Mike
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Old 01-12-2019   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by filmtwit View Post
It's like "watching tea boil."

A. Kurosawa
Yes but its better than watching grass grow...well maybe not.

(But I do love it for some weird masochistic reason)

The thing about Ozu movies is that there are too many car chases and gunfights.
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Old 01-12-2019   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by telenous View Post
That film ("Good Morning") has such a stunning colour palette. Muted, earthy primary colours. It reminds me somewhat of family photos on Agfa paper from the 70's.

Yes the movie is referenced here: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053134/reviews

You mention the colors in his color films and I have noticed how sumptuous they are and agree they are beautiful - just like old film stock. without being overdone in the Hollywood technicolor style. Check out the stunningly beautiful colors in this clip. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhQwFxhiVQs


And BTW have you noticed how so many of his movies have old farts sitting around, drinking and talking about the good old times, or family problems, or women. Sounds like my life.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLJqFxPH7Rg

While on the subject of Ozu I came across this video titled "Cafe Lumiere: Modernizing Ozu's Tokyo Story". It is kind of cool. https://vimeo.com/210008426
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Old 01-12-2019   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by filmtwit View Post
It's like "watching tea boil."

A. Kurosawa
I guess I'm a big fan of watching tea boil. BTW, nobody around here boils tea, just the water to make tea.

Mike
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Old 01-12-2019   #60
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Don't know how much is director and how much DP, but anyway
Knife in The Water (1962) Jerzy Lipman DP, Roman Polanski D.


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Old 01-12-2019   #61
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Scorsese in “Raging Bull”.
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Old 01-12-2019   #62
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Another vote for Anrdrei Tarkovsky. Solaris...Stalker...you'll be able to find his
work online. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrei_Tarkovsky
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Old 01-12-2019   #63
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Sophia Coppola. There was a piece on her in a recent Aperture magazine. Actually the whole issue was about basically the subject of this thread but she's the one I can think of right now. She bases her cinematographic palettes using storyboards based on (often famous) still (film) photographs. I think she only uses film (not digital) for her movies too but my memory is vague.
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Old 01-12-2019   #64
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OK, I'll stop here. Tarkovsky was a true master... If interested, look for his work online. Cheers, Peter
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Old 01-12-2019   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by telenous View Post
That film ("Good Morning") has such a stunning colour palette. Muted, earthy primary colours. It reminds me somewhat of family photos on Agfa paper from the 70's.
I learned so much from that film. It is still a guiding light for me. It taught me that you can always do less, do it simpler and give attention to symmetry instead of drama.

The way Ozu plays location making it take over story as the moving force of the film is a master, genius stroke.
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Old 01-12-2019   #66
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Alfonso Cuarón (his "Roma" got a Golden Globe recently)

Of course, Eisenstein. And Bergman. Those two are icons of different eras.
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Old 01-12-2019   #67
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Alfonso Cuarón (his "Roma" got a Golden Globe recently)

Of course, Eisenstein. And Bergman. Those two are icons of different eras.
Bergman considered Tarkovsky in such high esteem he decided to work for him as an assistant or co producer.
Roma is a masterpiece and i never saw a movie so close to still photography.
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Old 01-12-2019   #68
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I'll throw Kogonada into the ring--Columbus was filled with images I would kill to have taken.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbus_(2017_film)






Glad someone brought this movie up here. I found it completely by chance on iTunes, and it blew me away. It seems to be underappreciated. I actually added Columbus, IN as a destination on a cross-country trip because of this movie.
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Old 01-12-2019   #69
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Quote:
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Stanley Kubrick is my idea of a director that shot films like a photographer because he started out as one. He always had that eye for framing a composition. Barry Lyndon is one of the most beautifully photographed movies I have ever seen (disclaimer: it is also one of the most slow moving movies around).
This. Kubrick's Barry Lyndon is what came to my mind. Many shots are like still photographs or painting. The camera didn't move,. The actors and props were carefully placed, like well composed studio photos.

For this movie he also bought the fastest lens ever made by Zeiss for NASA, and mod it to fit on movie cameras for the candle-lit indoor shots..
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Old 01-13-2019   #70
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I only once saw Barry Lyndon when it opened, I'm ashamed to say. I went to see "The Favorite" last night which brought Barry Lyndon to mind. I wonder whether anyone else saw this film and thoughts about the photography. In particular the use of wide-angle throughout to set the stage for each scene.
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