Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Classic Film RangeFinders & Other Classics > SLRs - the unRF

SLRs - the unRF For those of you who must talk about SLRs, if only to confirm they are not RF.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Nikkor 45mm 2.8 GN
Old 10-17-2018   #1
madNbad
Registered User
 
madNbad's Avatar
 
madNbad is offline
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 691
Nikkor 45mm 2.8 GN

I've posted this on another site but tossing it out because there is so much knowledge here:

I recently bought a very nice Nikkor 45 GN. The serial number places its date of manufacture sometime in late 1968 or early 1969. It has the nine blade aperture and the connector switch works well. The lens looks almost unused but my question is about focusing. When the focusing ring and aperture are linked there is no play in the focusing ring at all. When uncoupled the focusing ring has a fair amount of slack before it actually starts to focus. Is this normal with this lens or would a good cleaning tighten up the focusing ring? I've used many different Nikkors over the years but this lens was never one of them. I didn't pay a lot for this particular lens and tried it out today on the Df and the performance is better than expected making it a keeper. Any ideas would be appreciated.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-17-2018   #2
Hogarth Ferguson
Registered User
 
Hogarth Ferguson's Avatar
 
Hogarth Ferguson is offline
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 649
I have this lens, for almost the entire focus throw it seems like there is almost no movement, at the last bit of the turn it moves rapidly.So, from about infinity to 5 meters, it looks like the lens does not move at all. From 5 meters to about 1.4 it moves a bit, then at 1.4 to .8 it really jumps.

I barely used this lens, it was given to me. I didn't even realize you could lock the focus/aperture. I figured there was something special about it, just never looked into it.
__________________
My Website
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-17-2018   #3
madNbad
Registered User
 
madNbad's Avatar
 
madNbad is offline
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 691
On the bottom of the lens there is a Guide Number scale, select the GN, lock the focus and the aperture with the switch and the aperture changes as you focus to provide better control for flash photography. It was a mechanical means of trying to improve flash results for event photographers. Several months after Nikon released this lens, Braun introduced the first thyristor flash and rendered it obsolete. Other than its' pancake size, it doesn't have a whole lot going for it. Close focus is just shy of a meter, it's only 2.8 and not the sharpest of lenses but it is incredibly small for an SLR lens. The copy I have the focusing ring has almost no resistance between infinity and 30 meters then it starts to focus. That's why I'm trying to find out if the slackness is inherent to the design.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-17-2018   #4
splitimageview
Registered User
 
splitimageview is offline
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,108
The one I had had similar behavior
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-17-2018   #5
Contarama
Registered User
 
Contarama is offline
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 1,257
Camera porn deluxe

From TCS. Yotsuya F2 Eye-level finder with the 45/2.8

http://tokyocamerastyle.com/image/348982626
__________________
Art is the ability to make something...even if it is a big mess...
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-18-2018   #6
madNbad
Registered User
 
madNbad's Avatar
 
madNbad is offline
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 691
Found the answer to my question. The 45 GN uses a cam for focusing instead of the traditional helical. The cam was used to insure the aperture blades would move as the lens was focused when linked. When the focusing ring is unlinked from the aperture it needs to move to a point where the cam is engaged. Since there is not much change in the focal point between infinity and thirty meters, that accounts for the slackness. As a bonus for Leica and Canon users, the focusing throw is from right to left. The later 45 P (Pancake) uses a helical design. Not much of a close up lens but here's an example, Nikon Df, [email protected]/500 ISO 320:
[IMG]1MD_0656 2 by Michael DeLuca, on Flickr[/IMG]

A crop from the same image:

[IMG]1MD_0656 by Michael DeLuca, on Flickr[/IMG]
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-20-2018   #7
leicapixie
Registered User
 
leicapixie is offline
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Toronto.Canada
Posts: 1,623
Thank you all about "no feel focus" of lens!
I stopped using it, thinking (wrongly) not focusing!
I used it decades ago as a compact street lens, mostly for flash use.
Big strobe units, flashbulbs all not auto quench, it was great.
Very sharp (Tessar like) lens, contrasty and very little distortion.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-20-2018   #8
Robert Lai
Registered User
 
Robert Lai is offline
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,639
As a flash bulb user, I love this lens. It gives me guaranteed correct exposure, as long as I set the correct guide number for the bulb/ film in question. It is also very sharp, and petite. There is nothing not to love about this lens. Finally, it focuses in the Leica / Canon direction, so I don't have the moments of confusion when I switch over from my Leica cameras.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-20-2018   #9
Huss
Registered User
 
Huss is offline
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Venice, CA
Posts: 8,055
Yeah the focus feel is a bit funky, but the lens is great.

Nikon F, 45mm GN, Fuji C200, D850 scan:

  Reply With Quote

Old 10-20-2018   #10
madNbad
Registered User
 
madNbad's Avatar
 
madNbad is offline
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 691
Here's a link to the article I found: https://richardhaw.com/2016/03/13/re...kor-45mm-f2-8/

The lens is at the shop getting a CLA, mostly to replace the dried out lubricant. I also bought a couple of 12 packs of Sylvania 25B flashbulbs for fun.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-20-2018   #11
Robert Lai
Registered User
 
Robert Lai is offline
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,639
Thanks for the link to Richard Haw's article on the lens. His Youtube video well explains the use of the lens.

He recommends using a flash meter to determine your initial guide numbers. This is fine for electronic flash. However, for flash bulbs, it presents problems. The Gossen Luna Pro F, for example will only sample the light output for 1/100 of a second. Depending on which part of the flash bulb's output it starts registering at, there is a significant discrepancy at what the proper exposure should be.

I have a Quantum Instruments Calcu-Flash II, which allows flash exposure calculation from 1/15 to 1/500 seconds. It has a trigger to fire the flash and start the monitoring of the output. Using the 1/15 setting will give you a better idea of the flash output.

In my earlier days, I spent many rolls of slide film and burned through many flash bulbs doing test exposures. My conclusion after all this testing is to just use the guide numbers on the flash bulb box. They form a reasonably good starting point for guide numbers.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2018   #12
madNbad
Registered User
 
madNbad's Avatar
 
madNbad is offline
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 691
Lens had a CLA and the focus is smooth for the full range. There is still very little movement between infinity and about 15 meters but the slackness until focusing starts is gone.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 00:42.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.