Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Photography General Interest

Photography General Interest Neat Photo stuff NOT particularly about Rangefinders.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

B&W Motorsports Photography
Old 10-18-2018   #1801
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,336
B&W Motorsports Photography

I thought this New York Times profile of race driver/track owner Tony Stewart contains some interesting documentary photography.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-07-2018   #1802
robert blu
quiet photographer
 
robert blu's Avatar
 
robert blu is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Italy
Age: 71
Posts: 6,014
Time to keep this thread alive.

Love the work of Bryan Schutmaat, specially "Grays the Mountain Sends" with portraits and landscapes in small mining community in the American West
robert
__________________
Remember: today is the Day !
from Ruth Bernhard recipe for a long and happy life

my quiet photographer's blog

My RFF photos and my albums on RFF
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-07-2018   #1803
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
one of the most under-rated photojournalists in the game

'haitian politics' is masterful

http://www.lesstone.com/Haiti_0401.html
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-09-2018   #1804
Contarama
Registered User
 
Contarama is offline
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 1,257
George Silk combat photographer

https://warfarehistorynetwork.com/da...ood-samaritan/
__________________
Art is the ability to make something...even if it is a big mess...
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-18-2018   #1805
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
It's really nice to see you guys keeping this thing alive.

I visit the front page of the forum now and then but, don't log on. I haven't seen any serious photography posts in some time. I stopped by here last evening and saw the recent posts. Good on you !

So, Merry C and Happy H to all. I'll try to check in more often.

pkr
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-18-2018   #1806
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Here's some stuff on Nick Nichols.

I knew Nick when he lived in SF and Berkeley with his wife Riba and their two young sons in the 70s & 80s. I haven't spoken with him in some time.

Nick is an adventurist at hart. When he was in the USAF, he flew on Tornado aircraft that would fly into the center of tornadoes to take measurements. He was the flight photographer. He loved this stuff.

When he was working for Geo Magazine in the late 80s, he was in South America on an assignment. I think this thing happened in Chile? He told me that, he had taken a cab from the airport to his hotel. As soon as he got out of the cab, the driver took off with all his camera gear in the trunk. Nick had the cab number and called the cops. The cops found the driver and the camera gear and had Nick at the police station, to ID the driver and claim his gear. Nick said, the cops were going to kill the cab driver. No trial, nothing. So, he fought for the guys life. He spent many hours at the station and then more time contacting press people over the problem. Nick said the driver lived.

The most recent Nick story is, about him breaking up a bar fight between two very famous NatGeo photographers. You would know their names.

Nick is a hoot, a really good guy and, a very good photographer.

https://www.instagram.com/michaelnicknichols/?hl=en

.
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-04-2019   #1807
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Usually flying under the radar but a superb photographer and human being.

Her Xpan work out of Iraq is starting to trickle out on Instabam

@NicoleTung
https://instagram.com/nicoletung?utm...=1vad7oq0sn3jx
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-06-2019   #1808
robert blu
quiet photographer
 
robert blu's Avatar
 
robert blu is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Italy
Age: 71
Posts: 6,014
Very strong good photos by Nicole Tung, whose work I didn't know. Specially interesting the use of pano to document the destruction in Mosul with an excellent B&W.
Thanks for the link
robert
__________________
Remember: today is the Day !
from Ruth Bernhard recipe for a long and happy life

my quiet photographer's blog

My RFF photos and my albums on RFF
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-15-2019   #1809
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
John & Robert,

Happy New Year to you two.

All the best, for great things, photos and other stuff in your lives, in 2019.

pkr
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-23-2019   #1810
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
John Densky
http://www.johndensky.ca/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-23-2019   #1811
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
John & Robert,

Happy New Year to you two.

All the best, for great things, photos and other stuff in your lives, in 2019.

pkr
And to you. This year has already supplied many interesting people
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Matthew Genitempo - Documentary B&W
Old 02-24-2019   #1812
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,336
Matthew Genitempo - Documentary B&W

This In Sight article contains some excellent B&W documentary photography.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-26-2019   #1813
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Hi Willie, Robert, John,

I hope you're all well and making lots of good photos/fotos.

Here's some new storm stuff from Mitch Dobrowner.
I've see his Audio Tech credits in many recent Sony Films..his day job.

http://mitchdobrowner.com/lightning-strikes
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-27-2019   #1814
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post
This In Sight article contains some excellent B&W documentary photography.
A very interesting read and outstanding photography. Thanx
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-27-2019   #1815
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
Hi Willie, Robert, John,

I hope you're all well and making lots of good photos/fotos.

Here's some new storm stuff from Mitch Dobrowner.
I've see his Audio Tech credits in many recent Sony Films..his day job.

http://mitchdobrowner.com/lightning-strikes
Im not even sure what to say... Beautiful seems to fall short
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-27-2019   #1816
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert blu View Post
Very strong good photos by Nicole Tung, whose work I didn't know. Specially interesting the use of pano to document the destruction in Mosul with an excellent B&W.
Thanks for the link
robert
Nicole seems to fly under the radar although she is an outstanding photojournalist, who continually digs deeper than most. When everyone else packs up and leaves, she stays to see the story out.
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-27-2019   #1817
Out to Lunch
Registered User
 
Out to Lunch's Avatar
 
Out to Lunch is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5,588
Pity she did it in Iraq. As we speak, no one cares about photos from Iraq.
  Reply With Quote

"All the world’s a stage in these photos of the ‘theater of life'"
Old 03-06-2019   #1818
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,336
"All the world’s a stage in these photos of the ‘theater of life'"

The most recent article in The Washngton Post's In Sight series highlights work by Magnum photographer Alex Majoli.

These B&W photos are from Majoli's recent monograph Scene.

The photos are purposefully not candids as assistants and supplemental lighting were used. The work continues Majoli's pursuit of "the idea that life is theatrical, but on a much larger scale".
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2019   #1819
Karlovak
Registered User
 
Karlovak's Avatar
 
Karlovak is offline
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 72
Why this photo - Luigi Ghirri
__________________
blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-16-2019   #1820
lynnb
Registered User
 
lynnb's Avatar
 
lynnb is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 8,542
Pictures and story in NYT about Bruce Polin's portraits of strangers around Prospect Park with an 8 x 10 camera. Superb portraiture.
__________________
Lynn
happiest when shooting 35mm and 120 film
RFF Gallery
Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-17-2019   #1821
robert blu
quiet photographer
 
robert blu's Avatar
 
robert blu is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Italy
Age: 71
Posts: 6,014
Thanks Lynn for the link, as you say superb portraiture and interesting read.
__________________
Remember: today is the Day !
from Ruth Bernhard recipe for a long and happy life

my quiet photographer's blog

My RFF photos and my albums on RFF
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-19-2019   #1822
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
More of "that kind" of photo news.

This kind of thing is getting to be a common thing now.

The Winning Photo of the $120K HIPA Prize Was Apparently Staged
Mar 18, 2019 Michael Zhang

The prestigious Hamdan International Photography Award (HIPA) has announced its 2019 winners, and Malaysian photographer Edwin Ong Wee Kee won the $120,000 Grand Prize with a photo shot in Vietnam showing a mother carrying two children. But the win is proving controversial today after a behind-the-scenes photo revealed that the shot was apparently staged.

The theme of this year’s HIPA contest was “Hope,” and the winners were unveiled on March 12th. Here’s the image that was used to announce Kee’s winning photo:

“[H]is photo documented an intense humanitarian moment,” HIPA writes. “The feelings of a Vietnamese mother whose speech disorder did not prevent her from feeling hopeful and evoking a sense of strength for her children.”
And it seems that Kee has been promoting his photo as being the result of an unexpected and “unplanned” moment:
“In the world’s biggest single contest prize open to the global photography community, Malaysian Edwin hit big with his single image taken from a recent photo trip to Vietnam,” PDNPulse writes. “Although he describes himself as a keen enthusiast, his full time profession is as a traditional Chinese medicine physician. His roadside shot of a Vietnamese woman and child was not planned and came about due to an unforeseen stop.”
But the photo seems to have been at least a little more planned or posed than Kee describes. Photographer and Street Photo BD Magazine founder Ab Rashid shared a behind-the-scenes photo today that seems to have been taken at around the same time as the winning photo.

As you can see, a crowd of photographers was apparently gathered around the mother at the same time as Kee, meaning his photo was just one of a large number of nearly identical photos that emerged from the portrait session.

Another classic photo of a photography tour group gathered around one subject, shooting the same image from almost the same angle,” writes picsofasia.

https://petapixel.com/2019/03/18/the...rently-staged/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-20-2019   #1823
lynnb
Registered User
 
lynnb's Avatar
 
lynnb is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 8,542
I like Jan Dobrovský's work. He's Czech, and part of the 400ASA Documentary Photographers Collective. His new book, Families, about Roma families in Northern Bohemia is available and looks good, though unfortunately it doesn't currently ship to Australia.
__________________
Lynn
happiest when shooting 35mm and 120 film
RFF Gallery
Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-20-2019   #1824
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnb View Post
Pictures and story in NYT about Bruce Polin's portraits of strangers around Prospect Park with an 8 x 10 camera. Superb portraiture.
Lovely work... Thanx for posting!
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-20-2019   #1825
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnb View Post
I like Jan Dobrovský's work. He's Czech, and part of the 400ASA Documentary Photographers Collective. His new book, Families, about Roma families in Northern Bohemia is available and looks good, though unfortunately it doesn't currently ship to Australia.
More great work. Not normally a fan of the 3:2 aspect ration but Jan makes it work very well
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-23-2019   #1826
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnb View Post
I like Jan Dobrovský's work. He's Czech, and part of the 400ASA Documentary Photographers Collective. His new book, Families, about Roma families in Northern Bohemia is available and looks good, though unfortunately it doesn't currently ship to Australia.
Really nice stuff. Thanks for posting.

I think Koudelka may have some influence in his work ?

pkr
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-01-2019   #1827
lynnb
Registered User
 
lynnb's Avatar
 
lynnb is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 8,542
"Shirley Baker (1932 – 2014) was one of Britain’s most compelling yet underexposed social documentary photographers. Her street photography of the working-class inner-city areas, taken from 1960 until 1981, would come to define her humanist vision. Shirley’s curiosity and engagement with the everyday world around her resulted in many different strands of work, many of which are yet to be exhibited, each of which confirms her acute observation, visual humour as well as compassion for the lives of ordinary people as distinctive in its exploration of post-war British culture."

I can only agree - I love her photographs. Here's the link to her street photo gallery, mostly in Manchester and Salford.

I hope her site doesn't disappear. She has a few books, still available.
__________________
Lynn
happiest when shooting 35mm and 120 film
RFF Gallery
Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-07-2019   #1828
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Matt Black updated his website.

The image quality of his black and white work is really good on my monitor. I would love to speak with him on his methods. Willie, do you know how Matt achieved this look to his work?

Hi to my CW pals, pkr

https://www.mattblack.com/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-07-2019   #1829
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,665
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
Matt Black updated his website.

The image quality of his black and white work is really good on my monitor. I would love to speak with him on his methods. Willie, do you know how Matt achieved this look to his work?

Hi to my CW pals, pkr

https://www.mattblack.com/
I once heard him say something about the lack of any decent light where he lives/works and how it impacts his photographs. Hard sun and little shade
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-08-2019   #1830
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,336
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
Matt Black updated his website.

...]
"Kingdom of Dust" is excellent. Thanks for the link.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-22-2019   #1831
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post
"Kingdom of Dust" is excellent. Thanks for the link.
Hi Willie. I hope you're well and making lots of pictures.

pkr
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-22-2019   #1832
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Tomas van Houtryve

https://tomasvh.com/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-26-2019   #1833
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Michael Wolf 1954 - 24 April 2020

RIP Michael

http://photomichaelwolf.com/#

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/g...yo-compression

"The award-winning German-born photographer, perhaps best known for his 2009 series titled “Architecture of Density,” passed away in his sleep at his home on the island of Cheung Chau in Hong Kong this week. He was 65.

Born in 1954, Wolf began his career as a photojournalist in Europe and the US before turning his gaze to the more under-appreciated qualities of major cities around the world, including Tokyo, Chicago, and Paris. But he was most fascinated by Hong Kong, where he moved to in 1994, and it was there that he produced his most important body of work.
His last book project, Cheung Chau Sunrises, was published this year, and showcased photos taken over the past two years in Hong Kong from 5:30 to 7:30am each morning.
“He used to look forward to waking up to see the next sunrise and be curious about what would unfold in front of him,” Sarah Greene, director of Hong Kong’s Blue Lotus Gallery, which represented Wolf, told Quartz. “Everyday he would look at the same landscape but yet it would look different everyday. This was Michael in a nutshell, curious about life, art and photography, a sensitive observer who perceived the world like no other.”"

More
https://qz.com/quartzy/1605390/micha...ty-died-at-65/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-30-2019   #1834
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Anush Babajanyan

Anush works with one Nikon FX body and 28mm & 50mm lenses.

http://anushbabajanyan.org/

http://viiphoto.com/authors/anush-babajanyan/

https://www.instagram.com/anushbabajanyan/?hl=en
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

須田 一政,
Old 05-01-2019   #1835
Taipei-metro
Registered User
 
Taipei-metro is offline
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,849
須田 一政,

Suda Issei 1940-2019
One great photographer from Japan

https://www.google.com/search?tbm=is...mg.VPwhZnLdYTs

'Another Place' by Suda Issei (taken in Viet Nam)

this photo taken by me from 'Asahi Camera' Sept 2005 Issue
g6, zuiko 14-42
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-04-2019   #1836
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Eric Meola

http://www.ericmeola.photography/bio

http://www.ericmeola.photography/por...ography/burma#

http://bermangraphics.com/press/eric-meola.htm

https://magnifissance.com/eric-meola...-photographer/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-07-2019   #1837
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
More Fake Photos.. How Beth Moon screwed the pooch.

This Milky Way Photo on Nat Geo is Raising Eyebrows

petapixel.com

By Michael Zhang



National Geographic recently published a series of gorgeous photos by photographer Beth Moon that shows some of the world’s oldest trees under the stars. But one photo, in particular, is now raising eyebrows after sharp-eyed readers noticed something strange about it.

The article, titled “See the world’s oldest trees by starlight,” was published on April 26th by Nat Geo science staff writer Catherine Zuckerman. It features photos by Moon, work that’s part of a project titled Diamond Nights, and here’s what the Nat Geo article says about how the photos were shot:
For Diamond Nights, Moon made the transition from film photography to digital capture. It’s a more light-sensitive technique, she says, and results in incredibly vivid images. Planning all her shoots around moonless nights, she wanted each tree to be primarily bathed in starlight, with additional glow from flashlights, for example, as necessary.
Because of the dark conditions, Moon set her camera on a slow shutter speed. This meant standing by for wind, and pausing during gusts. “With a 30-second exposure you don’t want the branches shaking,” she says. “So there was a lot of downtime.”
The article was shared across National Geographic‘s social media accounts. On Facebook, where Nat Geo has over 45 million followers, the shared story has racked up over 23,000 Likes, 7,900+ shares, and 500+ comments.

But people soon took to the comments to point out something fishy about one of Moon’s photos, a wide-angle shot with the caption: “Baobab trees are silhouetted against the Milky Way galaxy in Botswana.”

A closer examination reveals that a central area of the Milky Way appears to have been cloned at least a few times within the photo:

There’s no mention within the article of any of the photos being manipulated photo illustrations, and the images are presented as long-exposure photographs.
“Please do some research on a subject before misrepresenting the true night sky,” writes a commenter named Greg Stevens on the Facebook post. “Don’t get me wrong these are nice ‘picture’ but some of them have had the clone stamp used to create a false Milky Way and this should have been made clear before publishing.”
We’ve reached out to National Geographic and photographer Beth Moon for comment and will update this article if/when we hear back.

Images and comments at the link.

https://petapixel.com/2019/05/07/thi...sing-eyebrows/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-08-2019   #1838
robert blu
quiet photographer
 
robert blu's Avatar
 
robert blu is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Italy
Age: 71
Posts: 6,014
Interesting work by Anush Babajanyan. Love the diptychs in "This is our home" because of their visual and the story behind them. And "The House of Culture" seems me to be a book for my book addiction... I love hand made books!

robert
__________________
Remember: today is the Day !
from Ruth Bernhard recipe for a long and happy life

my quiet photographer's blog

My RFF photos and my albums on RFF
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-11-2019   #1839
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert blu View Post
Interesting work by Anush Babajanyan. Love the diptychs in "This is our home" because of their visual and the story behind them. And "The House of Culture" seems me to be a book for my book addiction... I love hand made books!

robert
Hi Robert, I hope all's good with you and family.

Anush has a good eye. She keeps her equipment simple and produces some good images. She updates her Instagram feed regularly so, you can follow her travels.

https://www.instagram.com/anushbabajanyan/?hl=en

Best my friend, pkr
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-11-2019   #1840
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,491
It seems the NatGeo / Beth Moon thing isn't going away any time soon.

Scientific Errors in Those Nat Geo Milky Way Photos

petapixel.com
6 mins read

The night sky offers an unlimited source of markers (e.g. stars, constellations, Milky Way, etc.) that never lie about the time of year and location in the world you shot a night sky picture from. You don’t even need to be a professional astronomer or to double-check RAW files to prove it.

Tools like Stellarium or the StarWalk app can help you verify your point within seconds.
National Geographic is at the center of a manipulated photo controversy this week over an article featuring photos by photographer Beth Moon. Moon gave this statement in response:
I am late to this discussion as I am attending my father’s funeral. First, I want to say that I am not much for technical expertise. For me, it’s not about the equipment. For these pictures I developed a fairly simple formula and memorized it, varying adjustments occasionally to suit the light. I also usually take my time producing work, but this work under starlight was the exception. With three back to back trips and a book deadline I enlisted the help of an intern seven years ago. During her 6 month term she helped to batch process images and she also hand-stitched the panoramic shot in question. I got back in touch with her to ask her about this process. She remembers stitching the images together one by one, lining up the tree branches by using the transformation tool to line each shot up. I believe the problem stemmed from the distortion of the wide angle lens used. She claims she did not use the clone tool. To be clear, I am not passing the blame on to her. My name is on it and I take full responsibility.
This is a painful lesson. I am sorry to have upset so many people. I did not intentionally try to hide anything and I apologize. With the passing of my father I am reminded to try to concentrate on a bigger picture, which I hope to do going forward.
In the wake of the controversy raging on the Internet over the past few days, I wanted to take a deeper look at some of the pictures that were published. The goal here was to try and determine if Moon’s pictures were manipulated based on the undeniable science of astronomy.

Photo by Beth Moon and published at National Geographic.
This picture (which was at the center of the controversy) can only be a panorama and not a single exposure. To be able to capture the whole span of the southern hemisphere Milky Way setting, you would need a fisheye lens that would distort the foreground. In this image, a specific warping mode was used during the stitching process, creating a bent Milky Way instead. However, what is most noticeable about the picture is the Milky Way itself. While its position and curvature are definitely possible at the location it was taken (Botswana), its overall shape and look is irrefutably unnatural. Some parts of the Milky Way were quite obviously cloned several times, perhaps to make it look more impressive.

Photo by Beth Moon and published at National Geographic.
The caption says that this picture was taken in the famous Quiver tree forest in Namibia. However sharp eyes or people that have been to that place will realize that the sky does not match the foreground. For starters, in real life, there is visible light pollution in several directions around the forest and none of this is visible here on the horizon.
However, the most compelling evidence is to have our own galaxy oriented this way. It is simply impossible in the southern hemisphere! You can perhaps recognize NGC 7000 (North American, Pelican nebulae, Sadr region), the bright star Vega and Polaris, which would be located above the frame. But the North Star Polaris can never appear above the horizon below the equator as a rule.

The Cygnus part of the Milky Way, if visible, usually points downwards. All these elements constitute a solid case about the photograph being, in fact, a composite where the foreground was taken in Namibia and the background sky somewhere else in the northern hemisphere, and at a different time of the year.

Photo by Beth Moon and published at National Geographic.
In this picture, the Milky Way appears over a baobab tree of Botswana. The Milky Way appears to be completely cloned out around the Eagle and Shield constellations, which can never happen in real life. In the upper right-hand corner, we can also discern either the Large Magellanic Cloud or the Small Magellanic Cloud completely out of place. This underlines a heavy cloning manipulation in the picture.

Photo by Beth Moon and published at National Geographic.
In this picture seemingly taken in Namibia again (with a Quiver tree in the foreground), we can see an upright Milky Way across the top right-hand side. Again the Milky Way can simply never appear in this manner in the southern hemisphere. With this orientation and focal length, the “Southern Star” (the point of the night sky around which the southern hemisphere sky rotates for a viewer from Earth) would be located approximately within the red circle. However this point is right above the horizon in Botswana! So the sky has conveniently been lowered so that the core of the Milky Way appears in the frame.

Photo by Beth Moon and published at National Geographic.
In this picture, shot in Utah, the Milky Way has blatantly been added in. The difference of luminosity of the Milky Way and the overall background sky doesn’t add up. When we zoom in and look at the stars in the Milky Way and outside of it, we can see that they don’t ‘suffer’ from the same aberrations (lens errors that affect the image). The Milky Way stars appear sharper and rounder while the ones below appear blurry and trailing. This only happens the other way around where corners get affected more than the center.
Another disturbing evidence is that the Milky Way has its core too high in the sky for the latitude of Utah. Judging by the size of the Milky Way, I would say the shot has been taken using a 14mm to 20mm lens. If you are stargazing in Utah, there is no way you can get that much distance between the horizon and the core of the Milky Way regardless of the time of year.

Photo by Beth Moon and published at National Geographic.
In this final picture, the Milky Way has been cloned and perhaps added in. It’s quite hard to tell what its real position is because you don’t know which part of the Milky Way is legitimate. In the top left-hand corner, we can quite obviously discern the Norma region of the Milky Way. In the top center, there is the core, but it’s the other way around! That bright area circled in red should have been well out of bounds on the other side of the dust lane rift.
As if this wasn’t enough, another clone of the fake core was added in the top right-hand corner. What can also be striking to anyone familiar with astronomy or astrophotography is that there is no atmospheric effect as you get closer to the horizon (you usually see a darker and more colorful layer on the horizon). It’s a natural effect that is always present no matter where on the planet you take a picture from. It’s another piece of evidence suggesting that once again the sky has been quite heavily messed with.

While the problem should not firstly be about these artistic pictures themselves or the photographer who produced them, it should be about how they ended up published by a reputable organization that promotes science and true-to-life ethics. These pictures should never have made it through the publishing process if they had been correctly spotted. However, this raises other questions like why did photographer Moon (or her assistant) have to manipulate the pictures in the first place? A hint could be hidden within the lines of the article:
“Lots of places have either old trees or dark skies, but not both. When the two do intersect, the location is often challenging to reach,” Moon says.

About the author: Adrien Mauduit is a professional astrophotographer and cinematographer and the CEO and owner of Night Lights Films. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. Mauduit also does science education, communication, and public outreach for Project PoSSUM. You can find more of Mauduit’s work Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Many photos at the link

https://petapixel.com/2019/05/10/sci...ky-way-photos/
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:57.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.