Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Being a Photographer > Business / Philosophy of Photography

Business / Philosophy of Photography Taking pics is one thing, but understanding why we take them, what they mean, what they are best used for, how they effect our reality -- all of these and more are important issues of the Philosophy of Photography. One of the best authors on the subject is Susan Sontag in her book "On Photography."

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

where have the photographers gone?
Old 02-28-2015   #1
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,640
where have the photographers gone?

A must read for any new editorial photographers/photojournalists/enthusiast.

I once received $12, after agency cut, for a half page in one of the very big names in the US. The image was taken in Northern Syria after a night of being shelled by mortars. I fired said agency about 1 week later.

https://medium.com/@kennethjarecke/d...le-2821a8f6b3a
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2015   #2
lynnb
Registered User
 
lynnb's Avatar
 
lynnb is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 8,397
thanks John, an excellent article. Change is certainly not happening on this side of the lake, where newspapers are looking to crowdsource pictures, just like most everywhere else.
__________________
Lynn
happiest when shooting 35mm and 120 film
RFF Gallery
Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2015   #3
segedi
RFicianado
 
segedi's Avatar
 
segedi is offline
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Calgary
Posts: 1,233
Great article and unfortunate that it has to be written at all.
__________________
-----------------------

Segedi.com

Flickr

Twitter
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2015   #4
fireblade
Vincenzo.
 
fireblade's Avatar
 
fireblade is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,139
Interesting article.
The demise of a lot of professions is all related to greed.
__________________
Vincenzo

"No place is boring, if you've had a good night's sleep and have a pocket full of unexposed film."
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2015   #5
Michael Markey
Registered User
 
Michael Markey's Avatar
 
Michael Markey is online now
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Blackpool ,England
Age: 68
Posts: 4,048
Dave Burnett posted this too, on FB .
It seems a curious state of affairs and one that isn`t ging to change any time soon.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-28-2015   #6
sig
Registered User
 
sig is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 552
With cell phones there are more photographers now than there has ever been. If you can't see them you are not looking.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #7
Richard G
Registered User
 
Richard G's Avatar
 
Richard G is offline
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 37,47 S
Posts: 5,074
I had some correspondence with a couple of the staff photographers of the main broadsheet newspaper in Melbourne. They are great photographers. A new High Court judge was photographed by Simon O'Dwyer (http://www.smh.com.au/business/man-o...215-2eimq.html) and I just had to write to compliment him on the portrait and the lack of law books for a background and the wonderful warm Ektar-like colour.

He was working as the photographic editor overnight when he emailed me back. So far as I know he is still employed by the paper.

Ironic that when pictures are more important than ever, so many potential employers are settling for any old junk. To tell you the truth, in the linked article I loved the first photograph, and thought some of the next few were examples of how it goes wrong without an experienced staff photographer!
__________________
Richard
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #8
JP Owens
Registered User
 
JP Owens is offline
Join Date: Dec 2014
Age: 68
Posts: 357
Welcome to the 21st century. The soup line starts on the left.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #9
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,640
Quote:
Originally Posted by sig View Post
With cell phones there are more photographers now than there has ever been. If you can't see them you are not looking.
I suspect the point of the article was missed. Of course there is a tsunami of 'photographers' in this day, when the term is stripped to the most literal sense.
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #10
Michael Markey
Registered User
 
Michael Markey's Avatar
 
Michael Markey is online now
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Blackpool ,England
Age: 68
Posts: 4,048
Ah ...
I`m still shocked at the $12 .
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #11
Hsg
who dares wins
 
Hsg is offline
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 641
Peter Lik? His doing very well.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #12
Hsg
who dares wins
 
Hsg is offline
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 641
Some people are saying that the days of cameras as a stand alone piece of equipment is near its end... With digital camera sales in free fall, one can see why such claims are made... Already, most digital cameras are video cameras as well, and their video capability is the one area that is progressing while the still part is plateaued for now.

Once the stand-alone camera is no longer produced for mass market, that is when the word photographer will also slowly fade into history... How long before that happens? Not very long.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #13
zuikologist
.........................
 
zuikologist is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: London
Posts: 1,870
IMHO this has much to do with the hollowing out of the "middle-class" professions by technology. IT, in particular AI, will resign many once respectable jobs (book-keeping and accounting, banking and finance, much law related activity etc) to history. How long before disposable AI-enabled drones shooting and downloading high speed video in real time replace most press photographers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hsg View Post
Some people are saying that the days of cameras as a stand alone piece of equipment is near its end... With digital camera sales in free fall, one can see why such claims are made... Already, most digital cameras are video cameras as well, and their video capability is the one area that is progressing while the still part is plateaued for now.

Once the stand-alone camera is no longer produced for mass market, that is when the word photographer will also slowly fade into history... How long before that happens? Not very long.
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=867'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #14
Hsg
who dares wins
 
Hsg is offline
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by zuikologist View Post
IMHO this has much to do with the hollowing out of the "middle-class" professions by technology. IT, in particular AI, will resign many once respectable jobs (book-keeping and accounting, banking and finance, much law related activity etc) to history. How long before disposable AI-enabled drones shooting and downloading high speed video in real time replace most press photographers?
I was going to mention the AI but I didn't.


I have asked myself, how long before AI learns to take 'aesthetically' pleasing photos, all by itself?

How long before AI learns to edit photos based on what it thinks are good pictures, learned by looking at database of photos by all great photographers and museum exhibits?

How long before taking photos of people on the street becomes illegal because of Ai face-recognition? Or wearable cameras that anyone can wear and take photos or capturing Hi-res video without anyone knowing?

The future does not seem very promising not only for photographers but for most people.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #15
Hsg
who dares wins
 
Hsg is offline
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by emraphoto View Post
I don't think the technology replaces the vision.
Is there any demand for a 'visionary photographer'?
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #16
NY_Dan
Registered User
 
NY_Dan's Avatar
 
NY_Dan is offline
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: New York City area
Posts: 1,193
The publishing industry, even when times were much better, always wanted to pay less and get more. Now it's worse. Many of the photos editors had a higher code back then. They're all gone now.

I did chuckle at the term beholders -- it's accurate. People who can't take a picture judging others who can. The contests that exist to generate entry fees, the paid portfolio reviews promising pathways to success -- sad.

If you love photography, you get a day job and shoot for yourself. Even actors have Actors Equity -- and can get benefits. Musicians get royalties. Photographers get hahahahahaha.

You can earn more selling cameras than shooting with them. Of course from time to time a photographer may have a good run for a few years -- but it's the toughest go. And motion is more salable.

Bumped into a guy I went to photo school with around 1980 -- he was working for the LIRR Railroad. That guy was a visionary Nonetheless, photography for many years allowed me certain freedoms...
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #17
Highway 61
Revisited
 
Highway 61's Avatar
 
Highway 61 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,782
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY_Dan View Post
The publishing industry, even when times were much better, always wanted to pay less and get more. Now it's worse. Many of the photos editors had a higher code back then. They're all gone now.

I did chuckle at the term beholders -- it's accurate. People who can't take a picture judging others who can. The contests that exist to generate entry fees, the paid portfolio reviews promising pathways to success -- sad.

If you love photography, you get a day job and shoot for yourself. Even actors have Actors Equity -- and can get benefits. Musicians get royalties. Photographers get hahahahahaha.

You can earn more selling cameras than shooting with them. Of course from time to time a photographer may have a good run for a few years -- but it's the toughest go. And motion is more salable.

Bumped into a guy I went to photo school with around 1980 -- he was working for the LIRR Railroad. That guy was a visionary Nonetheless, photography for many years allowed me certain freedoms...
This is all true.

And - you will get hundreds of favs and superlative comments on flickr by posting photos of... cameras, especially if they're vintage and shot on some vintage wooden floor, close to vintage books...
__________________

  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #18
Hsg
who dares wins
 
Hsg is offline
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by emraphoto View Post
AI can understand the rules however it does not do well with challenging rules in a constructive manner. This is what made Telex Iran such an important book. It was a direct challenge to conventional approach.
Imho a book is only important, if it remains important throughout history - like Thucydides and his History of the Peloponnesian War. Now that book will always be important and relevant, even if Ai did take over.

Telex Iran, must have been an important book when it was released, but now, it seems out-dated and its images are not very different from the work of Abaas.

I think, what professional PJ journalism has experienced in the last few years have been a brutal and traumatic ego-deflation. From star celebrities to unemployed, that is the reality of most famous PJs, perhaps even of Gille Peress or Abaas...

Sometimes, its good to be a nobody, and for me as an armature who has never made any money from photography or has never had a show or a book or anything like that, there is also no claim to the label 'photographer'.

To answer your question, the photographers are there, but the need for them has evaporated.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #19
NY_Dan
Registered User
 
NY_Dan's Avatar
 
NY_Dan is offline
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: New York City area
Posts: 1,193
An "armature?" Teachers, cops, bus drivers, and more all have unions to protect them. They demand a living wage, and they get it. Many people do not -- these days the young are sacrificing their youth for nothing -- they live with roommates, have no savings or chance of it, postpone having kids -- if they ever can, and it's a nobody can have anything so a few can have everything, and this will leave all with nothing. Photographs have no value? Okay, take a magazine and cut out all the photographs -- or white out every photo and see who wants to look at it...
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #20
rscheffler
Registered User
 
rscheffler is offline
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hsg View Post
Is there any demand for a 'visionary photographer'?
Yes, of course.

Perhaps the question is rather: Who will pay such a photographer a viable rate and with usage terms respectful of the photographer's longterm interests?

Control over information and monetization of its distribution is the goal of all the big players. In the realm of photography, you have the likes of Getty cranking out as much volume as possible. For them, it's irrelevant how many photographers/contributors feed their collections, so long as the numbers grow. They still take their cut of the action from the gross sales, which percentage-wise has constantly crept higher and higher in their favor, while the photographer masses divvy up their shrinking share into much smaller slices.

It explains the $12 Syria photo.

Perhaps time is starting to run out for Getty, saddled by a $2.46B debt. Yes - BILLION.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #21
NY_Dan
Registered User
 
NY_Dan's Avatar
 
NY_Dan is offline
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: New York City area
Posts: 1,193

I asked the psychic to read my palm -- she said I had a short photography lifeline.

Then I read her palm, and I could tell she was a smoker.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #22
Peter Wijninga
Registered User
 
Peter Wijninga's Avatar
 
Peter Wijninga is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,975
This sad story has been told many times by many photographers. I'd be more interested in stories of photographers who are finding their way in this new market and commercial landscape.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #23
FrankS
Registered User
 
FrankS's Avatar
 
FrankS is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Canada, eh.
Age: 62
Posts: 19,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by helenhill View Post
Not trying to hijack this Thread, just saw this photo
This is One of my Favorite shots of yours Dan .. just So Good, Subline !
+ 1
__________________
my little website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

photography makes me happy
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #24
noisycheese
Normal(ish) Human
 
noisycheese is offline
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,279
Quote:
Originally Posted by emraphoto View Post
A must read for any new editorial photographers/photojournalists/enthusiast.

I once received $12, after agency cut, for a half page in one of the very big names in the US. The image was taken in Northern Syria after a night of being shelled by mortars. I fired said agency about 1 week later.

https://medium.com/@kennethjarecke/d...le-2821a8f6b3a
What?? You mean you weren't grateful to be paid $12 for risking your life in a war zone?? Good Gawdamighty, some people are SO self-centered and greedy!!

From the article in the link -
Quote:
...In an industry that’s already decided that good enough is good enough...
More like half-assed is good enough.

And -
Quote:
...The DoP/photogralher relationship was once symbiotic. I'll give you money and access, you give me amazing photographs, we'll publish them and everyone will see how brilliant we both are.


Now the relationship is one sided and abusive. Today the DoP’s (or their picture editors) pitch goes something like this, I’ll give you a little bit of money (or none), you’ll deliver exactly what I want and the pictures you make will belong to me. Take it or leave it, but know there are plenty of people queued up to take your place...
Hopefully the greed of these agencies will cause the agencies to collapse.



It is unfortunate that photographers choose to let themselves be exploited and abused, but the truth is that no one holds a gun to their head; they agree to being exploited and abused by greedy, immoral agencies.



Individual persons who abuse, exploit and steal from people are referred to as psychopaths. Corporations who abuse, exploit and steal from people supposedly do it "for the good of the company" which somehow in their minds makes it okay; it makes it good business.


It is not good business.
__________________
The Leica M passion: From the inside it's hard to explain; from the outside it's hard to understand.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-01-2015   #25
pakeha
Registered User
 
pakeha is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Pacific
Posts: 901
I am not shocked that someone thought it was just fine to pay out $12.00.
Seems often that the moral compass is so far out of whack that you start looking at other cultures in a completely different light.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-02-2015   #26
JP Owens
Registered User
 
JP Owens is offline
Join Date: Dec 2014
Age: 68
Posts: 357
As someone whose income has been affected by this progressive devaluation of photography, I do have a dog in the hunt. The reality, though, is that nothing is going to reverse the trend. Once the demons are freed from Pandora's box, they aren't going to go back in.

The marginal value of everything in a capitalistic system, including labor, eventually reaches zero. The speed of technological advance simply accelerates that trend. As that happens, it pushes all the wealth to the top. And the ones with the wealth have the power to maintain that position once they hold it. Until it collapses from its own weight.

In the meantime, a lot of folks suffer. Not only photographers.

Welcome to the 21st century.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-02-2015   #27
leicapixie
Registered User
 
leicapixie is offline
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Toronto.Canada
Posts: 1,577
The Media holds the power.
The belief we have free press and will are a dream.
I have an antennae for receiving my TV, no cable.
BBC,CTV.ca,PBS-NY,German and Japanese News feeds..
The news broadcasts are IDENTICAL.
The same faceless, men in black, give details, from a "source" CIA ?.

My photography was always balanced by another profession.
I made more money in photography doing weddings, family gatherings and publicity photography, the ever a Front Page photo!
I waited sometimes 17 wks after publication, minus taxes or whatever..
Only when i approached the Photo Editor of the top South African newspaper,
and arranged payment from their "petty cash"" did the long wait to payment cease.
A few, a very few make a steady living, but "big" names are no guarantee.
Magnum and many others do "workshops" for added money.
The greed of the cretins in big companies results in new areas on the web.
Explore those, have a good employment or better your own company.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-08-2015   #28
Lawrence Sheperd
Registered User
 
Lawrence Sheperd's Avatar
 
Lawrence Sheperd is offline
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Charleston SC
Age: 60
Posts: 344
Quote:
Originally Posted by emraphoto View Post
perhaps the question should be reframed? where have all the photographers gone? literally. what are they doing now? where is the work appearing? how are they presenting?
Pandering to the 1%? (tongue only halfway planted in cheek)
__________________
Regards,

Larry
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2015   #29
elmarman
Bail out the Brits too !
 
elmarman's Avatar
 
elmarman is offline
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: BRENTWOOD, England
Age: 82
Posts: 150
In my town of Brentwood, Essex , England the last 'Studio Photographer' has gone out of business, none of the local newspapers will pay for photos any more, the Chief Photographer and a Girl Photographer of the Brentwood Gazette lost their jobs just over a year ago -- now the Managing Director held a meeting an NO MORE 'Freelance' Work is to be given out -- I wondered why it had stopped -- the last job I got was JULY last year. Good job I have the British Government Pension now as all the newspapers get FREE hand-out photos and just have three 'Staffers' left to cover a huge area.
__________________
An 'Old Dog' but still learning 'New Tricks' !
Rangefinders: 1934 Leica II,1965 M2,1986 M6,1966 Werramatic, 1950-60's Zeiss Contina, Russian FED 4,1956 Agfa Isolette III, 1968 Mamiya Press Super 23.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2015   #30
bobbyrab
Registered User
 
bobbyrab is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 674
It's the downside of the internet. Newspaper and magazine sales have been slashed so there are no budgets.
As a social photographer there are so many more advertising options available, but they've all become diluted as a result, add to this a tidal wave of new people entering the market, either young enthusiasts, or photographers pushed from editorial, and it makes for a very crowded market.
it's difficult to know which way to go, Emraphoto, you say the crafty folk diversified the revenue stream, but into what?
The smart move was probably the photographers that built a web presence and are trying to create businesses with paid teaching either with download lessons, hosting workshops or paid sponsors on their sites. it all looks rather bleak to be honest, I think inventive marketing is a must now, and much more important than your talent as a photographer.
Who could have seen the consequences of the internet to both empower our culture whilst at the same time dumb it down.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2015   #31
goamules
Registered User
 
goamules is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,781
It's not just "corporations" and "media" that won't pay for photography, the pubic won't either. Pro wedding photographers are replaced by the bride's friend. Accident documentary replaced by the passerby with a cell phone. Art photography replaced by cheap prints at kiosks, or free internet captures. Photography clubs where you had to pay dues and drive to the meetings, are replaced by free Internet forums (like RFF).

The problem is society has changed, mostly due to the "freeness" of the Internet, and the "productivity" increases of technology ("...computers make doing ANYTHING almost FREE!..."). Today, people want two things only: They want whatever they want FREE. And they want it NOW. I call it the "Gimmie Now" generation. They carry those attitudes to their work and businesses. "I get everything I want for FREE on the internet, why should I PAY YOU for anything?!" It's why digital replaced film - a digital picture is FREE! No film or development costs. Are you starting to get it? Technology changed society.

So there you have it, photographers have become a niche hobby, because the "work" is done for free...somehow...by suckers.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2015   #32
TennesseJones
Registered User
 
TennesseJones's Avatar
 
TennesseJones is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 650
Fascinating, thanks for sharing.

Fees, royalties everything seems to be under continous assault in the creative world at the moment.

Soon making stuff will just be for the rich kids. And we will all be poorer.

Whatever one's view of the market I think we can all agree if someone's trying to mortar you to death and you still get the shot taken and out there to the world you deserve more than $12...


Quote:
Originally Posted by emraphoto View Post
A must read for any new editorial photographers/photojournalists/enthusiast.

I once received $12, after agency cut, for a half page in one of the very big names in the US. The image was taken in Northern Syria after a night of being shelled by mortars. I fired said agency about 1 week later.

https://medium.com/@kennethjarecke/d...le-2821a8f6b3a
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2015   #33
kbg32
neo-romanticist
 
kbg32's Avatar
 
kbg32 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: New York, New York
Posts: 5,586
I wish I had a dollar for all the calls and emails I get to use my images for free to illustrate someone's article or pod cast.. After all, they say, "It's free exposure. You never know what can happen if you let us use your image."

Yes I do... more calls to use my images for free.
__________________
Keith

http://keithgoldstein.me/
Keith’s Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2015   #34
Dave Jenkins
Loose Canon
 
Dave Jenkins's Avatar
 
Dave Jenkins is offline
Join Date: May 2010
Location: The Beautiful Northwest Georgia Mountains
Age: 82
Posts: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by fireblade View Post
The demise of a lot of professions is all related to greed.
No, mostly the demise of professions is related to technology, which is constantly changing, and to human nature, which has never changed.

Do you shop for the lowest price when you buy your cameras and lenses?
__________________
Dave Jenkins

My newest book, Backroads and Byways of Georgia is available now wherever books are sold.
Georgia: A Backroads Portrait http://blur.by/1gg1SMt is awaiting publication.
My best-selling book (28,000+ copies) is Rock City Barns: A Passing Era.
My web site: davidbjenkins.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-09-2015   #35
Lawrence Sheperd
Registered User
 
Lawrence Sheperd's Avatar
 
Lawrence Sheperd is offline
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Charleston SC
Age: 60
Posts: 344
Quote:
Originally Posted by emraphoto View Post
I'm not sure what that means. Pandering to the 1%?

Most of the folks I know have very interest in the 1% (as I understand it).

Most are already quite far along in diversifying the revenue stream.
This was a rather off-the-cuff allusion to those photographers who have decided that the "fine art" market is "the" place to be. A shrewd decision on their part. This was not aimed at the p.j. per se.
__________________
Regards,

Larry
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-16-2015   #36
flagism
Registered User
 
flagism is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY_Dan View Post

I asked the psychic to read my palm -- she said I had a short photography lifeline.

Then I read her palm, and I could tell she was a smoker.
Great shot, NY_Dan. Did you ask her to wave at you or did she do this naturally? Works perfectly!:-) Any tech details you could share on it?

Thanks,

Lewis
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-16-2015   #37
Scheelings
Registered User
 
Scheelings is offline
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Istanbul
Posts: 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Wijninga View Post
This sad story has been told many times by many photographers. I'd be more interested in stories of photographers who are finding their way in this new market and commercial landscape.
I'm only an amateur, however this is something that has interested me and I think that one area which can be tapped is by combining photography with your local knowledge.

Marsel Van Oosten has managed to combine his love of photography, with his depth of knowledge for wildlife. He's an excellent wildlife photographer in his own right, but he's managed to develop a business where he takes a slice off the safari market for those that want to focus on the photography aspect of it and then organises the whole trip for what looks like seriously big bucks. He probably also takes a slice from everybody but manages to obtain group discounts.

I don't see why more photographers couldn't do something similar - underwater photography 'safari' in the red sea for example....
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-16-2015   #38
Scheelings
Registered User
 
Scheelings is offline
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Istanbul
Posts: 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by goamules View Post

So there you have it, photographers have become a niche hobby, because the "work" is done for free...somehow...by suckers.
There are many other jobs just like that - they're the jobs that everybody wants to do - and if the market can't differentiate a photograph taken by an expert and a photograph taken by an amateur then photography is like music and art destined for the privileged (those that don't need it), the poor (those that chose it) and the 0.001% (the greats).
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-25-2015   #39
Scrambler
Registered User
 
Scrambler's Avatar
 
Scrambler is offline
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Toowoomba
Posts: 1,279
I'm very late to this party but can perhaps shed some light on the demise of photography in local journalism.

My son and some friends were competing in the F1 in Schools competition and sent a media release to the local newspaper, accompanied by a photograph of the team (taken by your correspondent).

The paper initially said they would interview the boys but then decided they "had enough information to write the story."

The whole release, lightly edited, along with the photo was published.

The team's media management mentor said "WIN!"
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-25-2015   #40
jbielikowski
call me Jan
 
jbielikowski's Avatar
 
jbielikowski is offline
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 959
Sorry guys but you sound like the doomsday is coming... and all you have to do is to adapt. There is a crapload of money in commercial work, so once in a while you can afford taking a break and do your own, important, stuff. And if you are smart enough you'll get money for this, public money. Documentary and social stuff moved to galleries and (self) publishing.
__________________

  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:08.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.