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Is Your Android, Nokia or Blackberry SPYING on You?
Old 01-17-2013   #1
CameraQuest
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Is Your Android, Nokia or Blackberry SPYING on You?

and there is no way to opt out, Thank You very Much!

"Eckhart wrote an exhaustive blog post about his startling findings: CarrierIQ collected lots data, including keystrokes, and there's no way for the user to opt out "without advanced knowledge."

See the allegations at http://www.theatlanticwire.com/techn...ing-you/45575/

Take note there is no mention of Apple - apparently iphones don't have this wonderful feature.

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Old 01-17-2013   #2
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Anyone who thinks their phone isn't tracked in some way shape or form (information gathering, usage gathering, location gathering) shouldn't use one. Even i'm not that paranoid.

iPhone 4 had CarrierIQ, but you were able to disable it in the "Send anonymous data" menu, and i'm certain CarrierIQ still exists in all phones in some way or form as a means to collect data for carriers to improve their service; regardless of claims.

It was funny when they first discovered CarrierIQ last year, on my Android (GS2) at the time I just force quitted the crap out of it.
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Old 01-17-2013   #3
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Iphones are rather dangerous for personal privacy. They are also very suseptable to being turned in to bots in a phone botnet. There are other things on a phone that are used to collect data. GPS is by default collected in photos you take.

There are people who troll facebook looking for vacation photos that are fresh. If you tell all your 10,000 friends that you are really loving it in Cancum, they will then look for photos of your house or family that keep showing the same location. It is is close, they may decide to do you a favor and check the security of your home.

I brought that up some 2 or 3 years ago and was roundly pooh-poohed. About a year after that, someone else "discovered" and posted.

But it is always good to be reminded that the internet isn't your friend like you think. Thanks to the Head Bartender for the reminder.
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Old 01-17-2013   #4
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... they laughed about the foil hat at first, eh?
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Old 01-17-2013   #5
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so much to worry about - so little time - every time you text or talk just sign of with the term` white house`..they will soon get sick of you

Last edited by pakeha : 01-17-2013 at 13:31. Reason: put in an extra o
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Old 01-17-2013   #6
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Doesn't this make all that "mobile online banking" very unattractive?
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Old 01-17-2013   #7
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increasingly higher resolutions in cell phones and web cams poses another threat - I read an article (I'll post a link if I can find it) which shows how photos taken without user knowledge from a computer web cam and smart phone can be put together into a mosaic to build a much more complete HD picture of a home or office environment. If sensitive personal information is viewable (a check book, or credit card) then the sum of the information extracted can be much more valuable than the parts.

All this done without user intervention, knowledge or consent - including activating the imaging device/s.
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Old 01-17-2013   #8
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There was a rumor back during the Cold War the post office is reading your mail and the phones are tapped. I guess "they" finally got it right.
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Old 01-17-2013   #9
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Shoot! I forgot again to buy a cell phone! I'm missing all the fun.
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Old 01-17-2013   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
Iphones have the worst privacy issues.. Blackberry is the most secure platform as this is what the NSA chose for the POTAS. Two levels of encryption if wanted. RIM is a secure system.

http://www.cio.com/article/561313/Bl...martphone_Safe

http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/art...ari-on-iphone/
a lot depends upon what privacy issue you consider. True the iphone GPS can't apparently turned off,

however Android phones are easy targets for all kinds of malware which does not attack iphones. antivirus programs are good ideas for Android devices, and of course Windows 8 phones. with iphones, its relatively a non issue.

Many users want to root their Android device for more control, yet some report that can make your passwords easily accessible.

supposedly an encripted iphone (locked after 10 attempts on the password) is virtually impossible to break. Not true with locked Android or Windows 8. A good hacker can get right past the passwords.

I personally can't believe how many people access their banks and Paypal on their phones. Lost or hacked phones can lead to major financial losses.

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Old 01-17-2013   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparrow View Post
... they laughed about the foil hat at first, eh?
LOL

Quote:
Originally Posted by HLing View Post
Doesn't this make all that "mobile online banking" very unattractive?
It certainly should.
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Old 01-17-2013   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
Iphones have the worst privacy issues.. Blackberry is the most secure platform - as this is what the NSA chose for the POTUS. Two levels of encryption if wanted. RIM is a secure system.

http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/art...ari-on-iphone/

Stephen if you have BPL or a smart meter in your hood, your toaster is spying on you!

If you really want to get upset, do some research on mesh networks, Coming to you soon.
Eh? I read the article on the iPhone and it just shows you how to bypass the location services and make your phone secure. Quote:

Turning location services off is relatively straightforward—simply go into Settings, Privacy, Location Services on your iPhone. From here you can toggle off location services globally such that no apps can access it.

Further, even if you have Location Services enabled for Safari, you should see a prompt whenever a web site is requesting location information from your iPhone. In fact, some sites such as Google Maps will even notify you when they cannot access your location, either because you’ve denied them permission (tapped “Don’t Allow”) or you have location services disabled—either globally or specifically for Safari



I couldn't get from the article any information to back up your "the iPhone is the least safe platform with most privacy issues" statement. In fact the way they work asking for user permission to authenticate is the correct way to do things because it allows the user to decide and if you're unsure you just block them globally by not allowing location services.

Also I have no doubt that RIM devices are secure, but you should be aware there is no free lunch and even security flaws are found in services used by Blackberry OS

However with devices such as the Torch 9800, the Bold 9780 and the Curve 9300 all affected there will be a lot of people out there who are vulnerable. WIth a huge amount of business people using these phones, RIM is contacting IT departments to warn them of the problem and suggesting they turn off JavaScript to protect their systems.

http://www.trustedreviews.com/news/B...nfirmed-By-RIM

If you're worried about these devices do what I do by an old dumbphone and use film. ;-)
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Old 01-18-2013   #13
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Personally, I'm not too worried about being tracked; but I am worried about losing my iPhone and having all my emails etc taken by a criminal who can request new passwords for PayPal, iTunes etc etc. Here's a good breakdown of how yours should be set up, from the London Evening Standard, in particular so Find My Iphone can't be deleted. Find My iPhone also allows you to delete your data remotely.

HOW TO KEEP YOUR DATA FROM BEING NICKED TOO

1. Select Settings

2. Click General

3. Select Restrictions

4. Set a Restrictions passcode

5. Click Enable Restrictions

6. Look for Deleting Apps and toggle the switch from On to Off. This will mean that no one can delete an app such as Find My iPhone without your Restrictions passcode

7. Scroll down the list of options until you reach the Privacy section, here you’ll find a link to Locations Services, click it

8. Select Don’t Allow Changes. This will mean it is impossible for a robber to disable the Find My iPhone application from broadcasting your GPS. You will now need manually to approve all new apps to access your location data.

9. Go back to the main Restrictions menu and select Accounts, changing this setting to Don’t Allow Changes. This makes it impossible for a mugger to disconnect your iCloud account that connects to Find My iPhone.

10. If your iPhone is stolen, it is only going to transmit its location for as long as a SIM card is inserted and is active. You may therefore wish not to inform your mobile provider in the case of a robbery until you have met the police.
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Old 01-18-2013   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Photo_Smith View Post
Eh? I read the article on the iPhone and it just shows you how to bypass the location services and make your phone secure.
This will block apps from requesting your location data. Perhaps even the kind of apps a wife spying on her husband might install. Probably not the kind of apps the detective agency hired by a wife spying on her husband might employ. And it certainly will not work against spying by the network provider, all organizations he supplies data to, and every other organization capable to fake the communication protocol or modify the operating system your phone runs.

In a nutshell: Investigative journalists - even more so if they are investigating politics, big finance or any other form of similarly high grade organized crime - should not own or use a smartphone, and be very cautious using any cellphone at all.
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Old 01-18-2013   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul T. View Post
Personally, I'm not too worried about being tracked; but I am worried about losing my iPhone and having all my emails etc taken by a criminal who can request new passwords for PayPal, iTunes etc etc. Here's a good breakdown of how yours should be set up, from the London Evening Standard, in particular so Find My Iphone can't be deleted. Find My iPhone also allows you to delete your data remotely.

HOW TO KEEP YOUR DATA FROM BEING NICKED TOO

1. Select Settings

2. Click General

3. Select Restrictions

4. Set a Restrictions passcode

5. Click Enable Restrictions

6. Look for Deleting Apps and toggle the switch from On to Off. This will mean that no one can delete an app such as Find My iPhone without your Restrictions passcode

7. Scroll down the list of options until you reach the Privacy section, here you’ll find a link to Locations Services, click it

8. Select Don’t Allow Changes. This will mean it is impossible for a robber to disable the Find My iPhone application from broadcasting your GPS. You will now need manually to approve all new apps to access your location data.

9. Go back to the main Restrictions menu and select Accounts, changing this setting to Don’t Allow Changes. This makes it impossible for a mugger to disconnect your iCloud account that connects to Find My iPhone.

10. If your iPhone is stolen, it is only going to transmit its location for as long as a SIM card is inserted and is active. You may therefore wish not to inform your mobile provider in the case of a robbery until you have met the police.
Thanks, helpful.
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Old 01-18-2013   #16
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There was a nice incident lately in Finland. Woman got her cellphone stolen. Suddenly she had images on a man appearing in her album: Phone images. The thief was shooting pictures of himself and the app transferred the images to woman`s computer. Woman sent the pictures to police and the guy was identified as a "previous customer of police" hehe.
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Old 01-18-2013   #17
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do not forget emails ,facebook and twitter e.c.t
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Old 01-18-2013   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevo View Post
This will block apps from requesting your location data. .
Correct and that therefore doesn't equate to the iPhone being the 'least secure' phone system as insinuated-I hate iPhones and would never own one but lets not pretend it's the least secure!
Any data your provider shares is in the agreement with your provider and not part of inherently insecure systems.
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Old 01-18-2013   #19
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RIM and Apple have closed systems which makes them, in principle, inherently less risky. For instance Apple unilaterally disabled JAVA on every Apple device connected to the Internet which protected those devices from a widespread malware attack.

Android has many different versions and phone users depend on many different vendors for security upgrades. The wide diversity of devices and vendors means security update distribution is inherently less coherent and the risk can be less, similar or greater compared to Apple and RIM devices.

The situation is analogous to Windows vs OSX. One is open and impossible to control, the other is closed and coherent control is possible.
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Old 01-18-2013   #20
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It seems my old nokia E72 is carrierIQ free. since I only use prepaid sim cards (much more convenient and cheaper for traveling in my experience) there isn’t much data to be collected anyway and I am not contracted to any carrier to have my info be combed over anyway. I suppose my new iPad mini isn’t quite as safe though.
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Old 01-18-2013   #21
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"...Without transparency there is no basis for trust. Which brings us back to MeeGo. For the first time, I can inspect every line of code running on my mobile - it's all available online. If I find something that I suspect might endanger my privacy, I can substitute my own programs, ones which I know are secure. I can guarantee that my N9 can not be turned against me, something that I can't promise for any other mobile.
Were I running a secure organization - like ASIO or the ADF - I would insist that my staff used the N9 for secure mobile communications. Were I in a profession that depended on my ability to keep secrets - the law, or medicine - I would insist my peers used N9s. The same holds true for businesses which need to keep commercial confidences. Only when things are open can they be secured. Open source is the only protection against prying eyes.
I'm holding onto my N9. Not only is a great mobile, it's the only mobile I've ever owned that I know I can trust. That means a lot now, and it will come to mean more, as we learn what kinds of mischief can be made with the secrets we fail to secure...."


The whole article here:
http://www.abc.net.au/technology/art...06/3384952.htm

I wanted a Nokia N9 because it was the last of the real Nokia phone. For me it was a jump from Symbian to MeeGo, and it was also going to be obsolete, but it's open source, which I've been off and on learning on my own.

Also, someone made an app for it to have manual control of the camera, AND lets it shoot in RAW. That's a bonus for those of us who don't want to buy a digital camera but sometimes needs one.
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Old 01-18-2013   #22
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Quote:
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Well, let me reply with: no device is really "secure". Some things may be more secure than others for a longer period of time.
Sure, as an admin of either a network or a single device you have a usability vs security decision, how much you lock down can impede users and therefore make for poor user experience.
Users at the college I work would love to run executables have right click etc Also all their iPad/phone must be authenticated against our NTLM and have passcodes, MAC address recorded the ability to remote wipe etc.

So while no device is secure, how you treat those devices does matter and my main issue was with your statement that iPhones were the least secure system which is false.
No systen is secure and some are better than others, the weak link in the chain is often the user...
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Old 01-18-2013   #23
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I don't think my phone is spying on me. But I certainly might be "spied" on from elsewhere due to the mere fact of my owning a mobile phone

EU citizens should know about EU data retention directive. If you have a mobile phone in one of the 17 or so EU countries that have implemented it into law, you're tracked. Can't avoid it. (It's an EU directive, so member nations don't have much choice, although several are fighting it.)

"The highly controversial Directive compels all ISPs and telecommunications service providers operating in Europe to collect and retain a subscriber's incoming and outgoing phone numbers, IP addresses, location data, and other key telecom and Internet traffic data for a period of 6 months to 2 years. This applies to all European citizens, including those not suspected or convicted of any crime." (EFF)

A German politician had to sue Deutsche Telekom to get a copy of the information about him. From ZEIT's Betrayed by our own data:

Quote:
Each of the 35.831 rows of the spreadsheet represents an instance when Spitz’s mobile phone transferred information over a half-year period. Seen individually, the pieces of data are mostly inconsequential and harmless. But taken together, they provide what investigators call a profile – a clear picture of a person’s habits and preferences, and indeed, of his or her life.
ZEIT took this Excel file and made a fascinating interactive map: http://www.zeit.de/datenschutz/malte...data-retention
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Old 01-18-2013   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangefinderfreak View Post
There was a nice incident lately in Finland. Woman got her cellphone stolen. Suddenly she had images on a man appearing in her album: Phone images. The thief was shooting pictures of himself and the app transferred the images to woman`s computer. Woman sent the pictures to police and the guy was identified as a "previous customer of police" hehe.
This is cool when it works on your own behalf..

For Android there is an app in the store called 'Carrier IQ', it's free.. and it will tell you if your camera is being logged or not. My phone is pretty old but it was free of that software.
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Old 01-18-2013   #25
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Why I have a $15 Go phone which is mostly off. I never text . I do not do electronic banking. My credit has been frozen so nobody can get a card in my name. All mail is shredded. My wireless network is encrypted. The two most used computers are hard wired. I do not use Google. No social networking like Linkedin, Facebook, or tweeter .

Nothing is put in email I would not want the world to see because it is all out there somewhere forever. Government has a vast network of spying based on the Patriot Act. There are hugh complexes of both underground and above ground buildings devoted to domestic spying in Washington DC. You have no idea what the government is doing.

Watch what you say and to whom you say it. Google FEMA Camps and FEMA busses and you will understand. We are being watched 24/7 Next step is domestic drones.
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Old 01-18-2013   #26
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For sure. A while ago it was the ole social security number that you give out, fill in, anywhere you go. These days they want your cell phone number. Your email account provider, facebook, twitter...or shops like Radio Shack tells you it's better if they have that so in case you get locked out..blah blah blah, some make it appears that you HAVE TO give it before you can get to your business. The scariest, most unsafe situation though, is that one person working for, say, the dentist, who've decided she/he will just steal your social security number, no huge technical savvy needed, just copy it down on a piece of paper. Or, the sales guy at Radio Shack decides that he could have anyone's cell phone number he wants complete with their home address. it's exactly like you say, there are no secrets.

I'm often thankful that the majority of the people who could have, didn't; there are way more decent people than crooks.
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Old 01-18-2013   #27
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Check out PreyProject (anti-theft) for some added security with any portable device.

https://preyproject.com/

And remember that your cellphone is not secure - don't do things you don't want public.
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Are we becoming a police state? Five things that have civil liberties advocates nervo
Old 01-18-2013   #28
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Are we becoming a police state? Five things that have civil liberties advocates nervo

1. Indefinite military detentions of U.S. citizens

2. Targeting U.S. citizens for killing

3. Arresting witnesses for recording police actions

4. Using GPS to track your every move

5. Surveillance drones spying on American soil

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know...nervous/12563/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Swartz
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Old 01-18-2013   #29
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As far as I'm concerned, your privacy isn't safe anymore on the Internet as a whole. You think you're safe here in RFF? Think again.
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Old 01-19-2013   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CameraQuest View Post
and there is no way to opt out, Thank You very Much!

"Eckhart wrote an exhaustive blog post about his startling findings: CarrierIQ collected lots data, including keystrokes, and there's no way for the user to opt out "without advanced knowledge."

See the allegations at http://www.theatlanticwire.com/techn...ing-you/45575/

Take note there is no mention of Apple - apparently iphones don't have this wonderful feature.

Stephen
Very interesting article. Interesting that this snooper was placed by the Telcos themselves and not by malicious actors. Visibility and customer reaction may get the Telcos to change their practice. Nice to have the white-hat über-hackers looking out for us.
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Old 01-19-2013   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andersju View Post
EU citizens should know about EU data retention directive. If you have a mobile phone in one of the 17 or so EU countries that have implemented it into law, you're tracked. Can't avoid it. (It's an EU directive, so member nations don't have much choice, although several are fighting it.)

"The highly controversial Directive compels all ISPs and telecommunications service providers operating in Europe to collect and retain a subscriber's incoming and outgoing phone numbers, IP addresses, location data, and other key telecom and Internet traffic data for a period of 6 months to 2 years. This applies to all European citizens, including those not suspected or convicted of any crime." (EFF)

A German politician had to sue Deutsche Telekom to get a copy of the information about him. From ZEIT's Betrayed by our own data:



ZEIT took this Excel file and made a fascinating interactive map: http://www.zeit.de/datenschutz/malte...data-retention
Thank you. This is one of the best displays I've seen. (Hit the "Play" button to see.) When one can subpoena Telco information and integrate it with social networking data, it's a remarkable detailed picture. Good to know that the good-guys can track the bad-guys.
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