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problems of not shooting enough
Old 07-23-2013   #1
mansio
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problems of not shooting enough

anyone also find this the problem?
where i am i find that often times i don't shoot enough due to:
1. rainy season
2. wrong time to go

what's everyone trouble and solution to shoot more often?

how do you guys plan your travel(local or not)
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Old 07-23-2013   #2
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Rain. Humm. Rain. Wazzat? (I live in the desert.) It does get 120 degrees out. Even the coyotes chasing the rabbits are walking this time of year. I go out early. Very early, when the weather is fantastic. I make myself "self-assignments" so I don't have any excuse not to take photos on a regular basis. I buy bulk film and roll my own. I'm building a b&w darkroom. Whatever it takes.
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Old 07-23-2013   #3
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Small cameras carried all the time...
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Old 07-23-2013   #4
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Excuse - none, reasons plenty. Work, get outa bed to late, family, sport, etc,etc. I keep telling myself to take a weekend away just for photography. No solutions, still looking.It sucks.
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Old 07-23-2013   #5
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Depending on where you live and your favorite subjects a drastic change of the time when you are going to take photos might help. For example, if time permits get up before dawn and capture the beautiful early light of the day or do the opposite and take photos after sun has set. At least for me it gets boring to repeat the same photographic topic over and over without changing some parameters and therefore I photograph less and less.
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Old 07-23-2013   #6
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Carry a camera. Carry a different camera the next day. Rainy season? Get a Nikonos and don't wear a raincoat or huddle beneath an umbrella . Get wet and see everything that is more beautiful wet. It's fine to plan special shooting trips if the exotic magnetizes you, but more meaningful photographs for the long run are to be found where and how you live. Photograph your oldest shoes, a ring of wet where the coffee sat on the table, your partners hair on the pillow, your neighbor's pile of bricks with the vines over growing them.

Admittedly I'm later in life, and have time to go out and shoot I didn't make a few years ago. But there's always time and the world is available in the early morning before work, at lunch, in the evening, and all night if you shoot Delta 3200.

I heard a story earlier today about a photographer who bought a complete Linhof large format setup, perhaps because he thought it would motivate him to make greater images. He used it a few times; now I'm going to try to sell it for his widow. She told me that when they moved to Alaska he'd pack a Canon with a bag of lenses, then not be able to keep up on the hikes to locate picturesque subjects because of all the gear.

Carry a camera. A GRD 3 made all the difference for me when I wasn't shooting enough. I swiftly learned that with a packable camera with great IQ, I saw more of the world that had always been there throughout my not noticing it, because I'd had snooty ideas about what sort of things could be photographed in a way that made my vision look good. Screw that. See everything and shoot as much as you can. The patterns and symbols and locations that mean the most to your seeing will emerge in their own time.
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Old 07-23-2013   #7
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I was shooting very little and felt as guilty as hell about it ... and being predominantly a film shooter the guilt is worse IMO.

I bought A DP2M in the hope that it would get me moving again even though it was digital ... and it did! I've now bought a much needed 35mm lens for my M2 and I'll be back out there with that in a very short time burning up the film that has been haunting me in the freezer.

The bottom line is ... the little Sigma got me very interested in image making again and basically cleared the blockage that was holding me back.
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Old 07-23-2013   #8
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One huge tip is to not force it. I get discouraged because of the less shooting I've done lately, but when you feel it and take your time and let photos come to you instead of trying to hunt to take a picture I guarantee you'll get better results your happy with in the end.
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Old 07-23-2013   #9
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Finding something i enjoy shooting tends to stop me.

I like landscape and rural scenes but live and work in the CBD of Sydney. not much in the way of rural here. My solution is always have a camera in the car when im traveling for numorious reasons out of sydney.
Also set myself tasks to practise an area of photography. eg shooting a still life with lighting on film.
Practising portraits. only takes 30 mins to shoot some photos of a friend.

Having mini projects works for me i think.
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Old 07-23-2013   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhl-oregon View Post
Carry a camera. Carry a different camera the next day. Rainy season? Get a Nikonos and don't wear a raincoat or huddle beneath an umbrella . Get wet and see everything that is more beautiful wet. It's fine to plan special shooting trips if the exotic magnetizes you, but more meaningful photographs for the long run are to be found where and how you live. Photograph your oldest shoes, a ring of wet where the coffee sat on the table, your partners hair on the pillow, your neighbor's pile of bricks with the vines over growing them.

Admittedly I'm later in life, and have time to go out and shoot I didn't make a few years ago. But there's always time and the world is available in the early morning before work, at lunch, in the evening, and all night if you shoot Delta 3200.

I heard a story earlier today about a photographer who bought a complete Linhof large format setup, perhaps because he thought it would motivate him to make greater images. He used it a few times; now I'm going to try to sell it for his widow. She told me that when they moved to Alaska he'd pack a Canon with a bag of lenses, then not be able to keep up on the hikes to locate picturesque subjects because of all the gear.

Carry a camera. A GRD 3 made all the difference for me when I wasn't shooting enough. I swiftly learned that with a packable camera with great IQ, I saw more of the world that had always been there throughout my not noticing it, because I'd had snooty ideas about what sort of things could be photographed in a way that made my vision look good. Screw that. See everything and shoot as much as you can. The patterns and symbols and locations that mean the most to your seeing will emerge in their own time.
Exactly, and if you are young shoot everything, even stuff you don't think is worth it. Keep every shot, because when you get older those 'period' shots will be great even if you didn't think so at the time. I shot plenty when I was at college, but I should have shot 5 times as much. Don't let work and your personal life interfere with your photography.
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Old 07-23-2013   #11
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I go through periods of not shooting much because life happens. One thing I've done for years, though, is even if I have no camera or time, I'm constantly setting up compositions in my mind with whatever is in front of me. It can be the halls at work, the passing scenery while in the car, walking through a crowd. In my mind I have a camera. I watch a scene unfold in front of me and <mental> click! I watch the light, I watch the geometrics of a scene, and I always, always, envision the final print (key point!!)

Of course, maybe I'm an oddball. I've always been a visual thinker, which is probably what pulled me towards photography in the first place. ..shrug..
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Old 07-24-2013   #12
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I try to take at least one photo every day. It doesn't have to be anything special though it might be. Just take the picture. It usually ends up being more than one once I start because I gradually start seeing more "photographically."
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Old 07-24-2013   #13
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I used to shoot more when I went to school downtown, now I work in a relatively uninteresting area of town, I don't carry my camera with me everyday anymore, I've become a weekend shooter.

There's plenty of excuses, I find a double espresso is usually enough to get over my inertia
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Old 07-24-2013   #14
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This is a very interesting question. I have many reasons for not taking images: Work, family, being to lazy to leave the house ... But there's another time killer for me: Developing, scanning and postprocessing film. Thus I often consider to stop shooting film, but could not make this decision so far. (I just started to use film again two years ago.)
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Old 07-24-2013   #15
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I think we all go through this at different stages of our lives. Looking back on a time when my children were small and I was trying to get established at work, I did very little shooting other than family functions - perhaps 6-8 rolls of B&W per year. But the little ones grow up and job stresses change so last year I shot over a hundred rolls of B&W. I have a show of my work coming up at the local library which will probably include about 40 prints. Hang in there, shoot when you can, it will all work itself out in the end.
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Old 07-24-2013   #16
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This is a very interesting question. I have many reasons for not taking images: Work, family, being to lazy to leave the house ... But there's another time killer for me: Developing, scanning and postprocessing film. Thus I often consider to stop shooting film, but could not make this decision so far. (I just started to use film again two years ago.)
Or shoot film and never develop, like Winogrand
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Old 07-24-2013   #17
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Usually events like street fairs, parades, markets, concerts, all make a good photo opp, just get out there and don't forget your camera. Sometimes just sunlight shining through the window giving a gorgeous illumination of your cup of tea can be a opportunity to grab that camera and take a shot, you just have to recognize it.



Or the veggies for your dinner :



And for these two examples you don't even have to get anywhere outside.
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Old 07-24-2013   #18
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Or shoot film and never develop, like Winogrand
I agree, taking photos is the biggest part of the fun. But to never develop seems a little bit extreme to me.

But I'm quite near: Yesterday I put a film I shot in August 2012 in my developing tank. I hope I'll find the time to develop this film within a week. And two weeks ago I found a slides film from spring 2012 that is waiting to get scanned.
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Old 07-24-2013   #19
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I spend a lot more time developing film, scanning, and editing than shooting, and even then I still have an enormous backlog of film to scan and edit. I don't worry about having to go out shooting all the time. I just do it when the light is good and I have something I want to photograph in mind. Sometimes I'll go weeks without taking a single photo. I spend the time catching up on my scanning and editing.
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Old 07-24-2013   #20
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Carry a camera at all times (well maybe there are a few exceptions ) - well, it did not help me. What helped was taking it out of the bag/pocket when going from one place to the next; being in the hand/around the neck, it will ask to be used.
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Old 07-24-2013   #21
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This is a very interesting question. I have many reasons for not taking images: Work, family, being to lazy to leave the house ... But there's another time killer for me: Developing, scanning and postprocessing film. Thus I often consider to stop shooting film, but could not make this decision so far. (I just started to use film again two years ago.)
Easy, build a darkroom
I rarely fire up my scanner anymore nowadays.
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Old 07-24-2013   #22
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Easy, build a darkroom
I rarely fire up my scanner anymore nowadays.
I'm not really sure how this is going to get him shooting more. It will force him to invest more time in building a darkroom and then learning how to use it, but that's time he could be shooting, which seems to be what he wants.

To the OP, this has been one of my worst years for photography, due to personal issues that I'd rather not discuss here. Either way, I'm pretty much chalking this year up as a loss, photographically. You could try getting an older DSLR and a prime for cheap and dip your toe into the digital waters, just to see how you like it.

I've got a D200 and AI'ed Nikkor-O 35mm f2.0 (50mm equivalent on APS-C). It lets me get close to a film SLR experience with a real aperture ring and the results are nice, too. It's helping me shoot when I do have the time.
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Old 07-24-2013   #23
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I always make time time to photograph. Digital (high ISO, fast lens) and living in NYC (bright at night in some areas) has made photography possible at all times of day. If it is raining or snowing, bring a cheaper camera or an all manual film camera to use instead.

I know one thing... I get antsy if I don't get to go out at least a few times a week. However, there is also nothing wrong with not doing it when you are not feeling it.
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Old 07-24-2013   #24
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I don't shoot enough because I am a lazy dull person with no imagination.

My fun is building photo related Rube Goldburg contraptions and cameras.

More fun building than actually taking pictures with them.

Go figure.
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Old 07-24-2013   #25
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I don't shoot enough because I am a lazy dull person with no imagination.

My fun is building photo related Rube Goldburg contraptions and cameras.

Go figure.
That sounds like hard work that requires imagination.
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Old 07-24-2013   #26
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Well Chris, "designing" is a loose term with me. I do love however seeing how one item can serve several functions. At photo shows I'm the guy rummaging around in the big plastic buckets, full of series adapters, old flash brackets, broken pieces of "I dunno, beats me" stuff. All marked for 25 cents to a dollar or so.

This is not a lonely undertaking. Quite a few of our members are very handy and show some pretty good engineering skills but I'm more of a dreamer and backyard inventor.

My latest "thing" is a bellows mounted 90mm f4 Elmar that will focus from infinity to 1:1 on a third party monorail bellows for my Olympus Pen F. It all started when I discovered that the lens head from my 90 Elmar would screw down and seat nicely in a series 5 thread. It's not the exact same thread but as I say it will spin on and seat. And of course it still works fine on the Elmar focusing mount. Years earlier, from one of those plastic bins I had picked up the bellows for $2 because "Hey, I might need this some day" The other parts were; the back end of a 'T' mount for Pen F, a series 6 to series 5 step down ring, a 34mm to series 6 adapter and a bit of aluminum sheet, and a few brass 2-56 flat head screws. All, except the screws, from my photo junk bin. With a series 5, plus 10 close up lens mounted instead of the Elmar, I have a dandy 100mm f3.8 soft focus lens too.
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Old 07-24-2013   #27
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I'm kind of surprised that at least two people on this forum have Gintama avatars.
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Old 07-24-2013   #28
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Well, Because I am "Mr Mom", (my wife works from 2:30pm to 1am), I find it diffecult to get out for a few hours.
Much may be laziness, since she is home in the mornings... but, it is her sleep time till about 11am. So, 11am to 1pm is a short time span to go out.
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Wrong fact
Old 07-24-2013   #29
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Wrong fact

I do when shooting film. My OM was loaded eons ago, and still got 18 frames to go. Problem is that I even bring it around and end without taking a single frame! (happens too with digital)

What I dislike about it is the sense of having let pass moments, which are gone.

What irks me is that with 36 frames a roll, I end being so meticulous that it takes me months to shoot all of it! And I consider film to be the most quantifiable way of shooting. I can have 1000s of digital photos, but I will feel much better having 36 rather than all of those. Just because I can hold them in my hand.

I seached (ages ago) around for "how to take more photograps" and what I got were useless tutorials.

Haven't almost realised, and for most of July I haven't photographed anything meaningful. But I don't stress it.
However, since December (when I got a m43), I got about 1000 frames shot on the EPL2. My friends go like when they see it. But as I said before, I would prefer to have shot 36-72 film frames rather than a thousand digital pics.
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Old 07-24-2013   #30
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I had a job where I worked 2 days a week the rest of the days were either days off or I spent on a plane. I had plenty of time to shoot.

Now that I have a new job that is 9-5 I don't have much time except on weekends.
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Old 07-24-2013   #31
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Excuse - none, reasons plenty. Work, get outa bed to late, family, sport, etc,etc. I keep telling myself to take a weekend away just for photography. No solutions, still looking.It sucks.
If I may, here is an idea: Expose five frames of film (or digital) each day. That is one subject, about two minutes worth of time. Just make yourself do it, come hell or high water.

All you have to do is make time for this exercise - just two minutes or so each day. It's not much, but it's a start.

It's all about making photography a priority and not letting it get pushed to the bottom of the barrel of life.

As the Nike commercial used to say, "JUST DO IT."
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Old 07-24-2013   #32
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I simply take a camera with me wherever I go. I just got back from walking my dog along the river, and managed to get a couple of interesting shots along the way. I often commute to work on foot, and there are endless things to take interesting photos of.

If you are part of the car culture in America, you probably have less opportunities to shoot. I find I do far more shooting now that I rarely drive a car.

On my rare days off, I take a train or subway 30 minutes or so away from where I live, and then walk back, shooting along the way. The scenery changes according to the weather or the year, and the city activity changes by the moment. What's better, I occasionally come across an old camera store or recycle shop which has something interesting.

I accumulate film for bad-weather days, it gives me something to do. One good thing about living in Japan is that the television programs here are so awful that there is little to keep me indoors. I tend to watch youtube videos while processing my film.

Time to go get lunch, the food shop is about 5 minutes walk, but I will take my camera with me.
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Old 07-25-2013   #33
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I'm kind of surprised that at least two people on this forum have Gintama avatars.
oh there's another?

to the topic, i do intend to move the darkroom in the washroom by end of year, i am in transition in between things so things will be slow on other things.
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Old 07-25-2013   #34
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My excuse is that I live in a city, but so much prefer to photograph nature. That will change soon though when I move to Australia in August, I plan to shoot more 4x5 landscapes, and very much looking forward to it.
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Old 07-25-2013   #35
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If I may, here is an idea: Expose five frames of film (or digital) each day. That is one subject, about two minutes worth of time. Just make yourself do it, come hell or high water.
That sounds like good advice. Good enough that I'm going to take it, anyway. How hard can it be? Yet by forcing myself to do it, I know it will make me look at old things in new ways. Routine during the week makes me think "I've done that already, why waste the effort". Yet ways of approaching a subject are infinite, so I can hardly have made a dent in that!

Even if the results of this exercise aren't that flash (and they might not be) I imagine that forcing myself to think of new ways to approach old subjects will be a worthwhile exercise in itself. But the exercise won't be complete unless I actually produce those five frames.

...Mike
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Old 07-25-2013   #36
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i have issue finding just 1 exposure a day, even after a full day of walk i could net nothing
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Old 07-25-2013   #37
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My excuse is that I live in a city, but so much prefer to photograph nature. That will change soon though when I move to Australia in August, I plan to shoot more 4x5 landscapes, and very much looking forward to it.
Where in Oz, might I ask? There are plenty of good opportunities to photograph nature, here, but Collins Street, Melbourne probably isn't one of them. (Rumours of kangaroos hopping down the tram tracks notwithstanding.)

The good news is that even if you live in one of our largest cities (and they have their own charms) rural and very natural landscapes are within easy reach.

...Mike
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Old 07-25-2013   #38
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I second the advice given by others: carry a small camera with you all the time, going to work, to do shopping, to the cinema, while jogging.. Take one that fits in a pocket and does not cost too much, so that as little focus as possible is on the camera itself and it becomes just a like a little notebook to record thoughts or impressions on (I carry a Ricoh GR1, you'll find what works for you).

Another thought, it works for me: watch a lot of what inspires you to go out and shoot, like books or videos of your favourite photographers.
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Old 07-25-2013   #39
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Where in Oz, might I ask? There are plenty of good opportunities to photograph nature, here, but Collins Street, Melbourne probably isn't one of them. (Rumours of kangaroos hopping down the tram tracks notwithstanding.)

The good news is that even if you live in one of our largest cities (and they have their own charms) rural and very natural landscapes are within easy reach.

...Mike
Mostly looking at Bonbeach sort of area in Victoria, places near the sea. It's not the great outdoors, but it's way closer than I am now in the East End of London. Beaches look quiet in the mornings and evenings, so I can pop along with my tripod etc.
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Old 07-25-2013   #40
mfunnell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thegman View Post
Mostly looking at Bonbeach sort of area in Victoria, places near the sea. It's not the great outdoors, but it's way closer than I am now in the East End of London. Beaches look quiet in the mornings and evenings, so I can pop along with my tripod etc.
I know the area very well! I stayed there, with friends, on and off for about 18 months over the last few years (their address was officially Bonbeach but actually closer to Carrum; they've since moved to Texas). I was going to point you to some photos but, unaccountably, I seem to have none I took in the area online.

It is a very good part of the world to be. Quite close to the Mornington Peninsula, which has it's own landscapes and beachscapes (and a very tasty line in wineries as well). A bit of a long haul into Melbourne proper if you're working there (as I was and, again, am) but not too badly inconveniently so. For more "fully" natural environments you are also well served if you're prepared to travel a bit (yet not too far). You could certainly do a lot worse picking a place to live!

...Mike

P.S. Please feel free to PM me (or e-mail mike who-is-at mikefunnell d.o.t com) if you'd like any further info, background or whatever.
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Last edited by mfunnell : 07-25-2013 at 01:36. Reason: P.S.
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