Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Being a Photographer > Business / Philosophy of Photography

Business / Philosophy of Photography Taking pics is one thing, but understanding why we take them, what they mean, what they are best used for, how they effect our reality -- all of these and more are important issues of the Philosophy of Photography. One of the best authors on the subject is Susan Sontag in her book "On Photography."

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

"Ghouls Took Photos Of Dying Suicide Girl"
Old 08-12-2010   #1
J J Kapsberger
Registered User
 
J J Kapsberger's Avatar
 
J J Kapsberger is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 700
"Ghouls Took Photos Of Dying Suicide Girl"

That's the headline for this article.

Most of the story concerns the unfortunate girl's troubles that led her to commit suicide. The lurid headline derives from this part of the article (which I quote):


'"[The coroner] praised the actions of passers-by who tried to help Robyn, but he said some had acted "in a shabby way" by taking photographs as she lay dying.

"You can only presume something like this has never happened to them, but it does make you worried about humanity," he said.

He added: "This was a child's life and you were taking photos on your mobile phones.

"I'm sorry, but I think that is horrid and the people who did that ought to be ashamed of themselves."

The coroner said no one could know what was going through Robyn's mind in the moments before she jumped, but concluded she took her own life.'


I don't know whether the photographers were simply offending the coroner's morals or whether they indeed neglected helping the girl in any way they could (assuming she wasn't beyond all help).

If you happened upon such a scene and had your camera with you, would you take a photo?
__________________
I love the smell of indicator stop bath in the morning...


My Flickr space
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #2
photogdave
Shops local
 
photogdave is offline
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Film-filled Vancouver
Posts: 2,123
Quote:
Originally Posted by J J Kapsberger View Post
If you happened upon such a scene and had your camera with you, would you take a photo?
Not in a million years. When I was a press photographer I had to photograph the body of a girl who was molested and murdered, as they brought her out of the crime scene. Most horrible experience of my life.
__________________
Digital - I just don't care for it.

Leica M4, M6, CL
Voigtlander lenses
Pentax Optio 43 WR
Olympus Stylus Epic
Rolleiflex TLR
Nikon F100, D70

My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #3
coelacanth
Ride, dive, shoot.
 
coelacanth's Avatar
 
coelacanth is online now
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 3,480
Quote:
If you happened upon such a scene and had your camera with you, would you take a photo?
No. There are professionals who do that as their job. I'm not one of them. There are bystanders do that just because they can. I'm not one of them.
__________________
- Sug

b/w guy.

flickr | Instagram

  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #4
dogberryjr
[Pithy phrase]
 
dogberryjr's Avatar
 
dogberryjr is offline
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Appalachia, USA
Posts: 1,161
"If you happened upon such a scene and had your camera with you, would you take a photo?"

Nope.
__________________
M, LTM, FD, F, Film, Digital, MF . . . Jack of all, master of none.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #5
Ken Smith
Why yes Ma'am - it folds
 
Ken Smith is offline
Join Date: Jan 2008
Age: 60
Posts: 266
Quote:
I don't know whether the photographers were simply offending the coroner's morals or whether they indeed neglected helping the girl in any way they could (assuming she wasn't beyond all help).
They weren't offending the coroner's morals - they were offending humanity's morals. That's assuming enough people have any morals left to actually constitute humanity as a whole still having morals.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #6
John Lawrence
Registered User
 
John Lawrence is offline
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,846
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogberryjr View Post
"If you happened upon such a scene and had your camera with you, would you take a photo?"

Nope.

Neither would I.

John
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #7
dcsang
Canadian & Not A Dentist
 
dcsang's Avatar
 
dcsang is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Toronto Canada
Age: 54
Posts: 4,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by J J Kapsberger View Post
If you happened upon such a scene and had your camera with you, would you take a photo?

Not a chance.

I don't even raise my camera towards the homeless nowadays - people need help more than I need another photo...

Dave
__________________
I own a Leica and I am NOT a dentist (I don't even portray one on TV!!!)

I have an idea what I'm looking for but it only becomes real once I see it - Constantine Manos

ITS THE MAGIC I SEE IN THE Light, Texture, & Tone
that Intoxicates Me - Helen Hill

My Flickr - it's where I post my RF and P&S shtuff
  Reply With Quote

Not in that way, they camera does not lie.
Old 08-12-2010   #8
Papa Smurf
Registered User
 
Papa Smurf is offline
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Forgotonia, USA
Age: 75
Posts: 160
Not in that way, they camera does not lie.

A long time ago, my brother-in-law and his family were in an automobile wreck on Christmas eve. Their infant girl died in her mother's arms. At the time of the funeral, both sets of Grandparents asked me to photograph the Funeral Parlor, including the casket and the body, just before the funeral. Their logic was that the mother was still in a coma, the father was still in intensive care and no one could say if either would make it. So, I did, when the photos came back I looked at one and only one. In the Funeral Parlor, the body was so pristine that she looked like a china doll. The photos showed something else entirely. The camera does not lie. I took the photos as an act of respect to the Grandparents that knew that they had lost a grandchild and thought that they might still lose a son and a daughter. I believe that the passers-by that took cell phone images will soon regret their actions. The camera does not lie.
__________________
Papa Smurf says, "Life is uncertain, eat dessert first!"
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #9
hipsterdufus
Photographer?
 
hipsterdufus's Avatar
 
hipsterdufus is offline
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ferndale, MI
Posts: 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcsang View Post
people need help more than I need another photo...
Couldn't have said it better myself. And, while I may have thought of taking a picture, my good sense and common decency would have overruled that fleeting thought very quickly.
__________________
-Eric K.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #10
oftheherd
Registered User
 
oftheherd's Avatar
 
oftheherd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 7,938
If I were absolutely certain there was nothing I could do for the person dying, I might or might not. But aid for the physical or spiritual well being would have to come first. If that weren't a concern, then if I thought it might aid the police/authorities, I might well do so. Just to do it to have the photo would not be of any interest.

I have seen many people dead, in all states from the scene of gruesome deaths to autopsy, and photographed them as part of my job. It didn't bother me to do so. But I didn't take any perverse pleasure from seeing it or doing it either. It was my job and my commitment to helping catch and convict bad guys.

I wonder how many who photographed the dying girl have since removed the photos from their phones? And if they haven't, what is their motive for keeping them?
__________________
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #11
oftheherd
Registered User
 
oftheherd's Avatar
 
oftheherd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 7,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papa Smurf View Post
A long time ago, my brother-in-law and his family were in an automobile wreck on Christmas eve. Their infant girl died in her mother's arms. At the time of the funeral, both sets of Grandparents asked me to photograph the Funeral Parlor, including the casket and the body, just before the funeral. Their logic was that the mother was still in a coma, the father was still in intensive care and no one could say if either would make it. So, I did, when the photos came back I looked at one and only one. In the Funeral Parlor, the body was so pristine that she looked like a china doll. The photos showed something else entirely. The camera does not lie. I took the photos as an act of respect to the Grandparents that knew that they had lost a grandchild and thought that they might still lose a son and a daughter. I believe that the passers-by that took cell phone images will soon regret their actions. The camera does not lie.
That must have been a horrible experience for all involved, especially you. I'm glad your were able to share it with us. I am sorry for all. I hope the parents survived and were able to have other children. That wouldn't completely fill the void, but it would help.
__________________
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #12
swoop
Registered User
 
swoop is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: New York City
Age: 37
Posts: 1,707
I've probably seen about a dozen actually bodies in my time as a photojournalist. Would I have photographed that girl? Yeah, I probably would have. It's my job. And it's depressing. The worst thing I've ever done was photographing a mother grieving after losing two of her children in a fire. And I'm sure someday I'll do worse. The editors praise you, but you feel like crap afterward. Over and over I show up at these scenes and I know that the only thing I can do is take pictures. I'm not qualified to help these people. I wouldn't even know how. Nothing I do helps anyone. Kevin Carter is the perfect example of the way your sense of morality can tear you apart in this line of work. Where all you can do is stand by and watch as misery affects everyone around you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #13
Steve_F
Registered User
 
Steve_F's Avatar
 
Steve_F is offline
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Hampshire, UK
Age: 53
Posts: 452
Even if I wasn't bound by a 'duty of care' my own morals would ensure that you help others first.

Steve.
__________________
www.stephenfell.net

'Thoughts & Scribbles' Blog



"You look at a colour image, but read a black & white one"

"Personal Development Through Image Construction"

M6 TTL Black, M6TTL Chrome, 35/2 Summicron ASPH, 50/2 Summicron

Nikon FM3A, Mamiya RZ67 Pro II
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #14
bob338
Registered User
 
bob338's Avatar
 
bob338 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sausalito, CA
Posts: 1,228
There is a horrible, sensationalist movie called 'The Bridge' about people who jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge. The person who made it conned the Bridge Authority to get his permits and even interviewed the families of the victims BEFORE telling them he had footage of their relative jumping.

In one scene a guy spots a woman about to jump and starts snapping away, they show his pictures in the movie and interview him. Eventually he decides to help her and grabs her off of the railing, which was the right thing to do, but I can't help but wonder why it took so long for the instinct to kick in?

I can't imagine wanting to see a picture of someone moments before suicide, much less being the person taking it.

bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #15
crawdiddy
qu'est-ce que c'est?
 
crawdiddy's Avatar
 
crawdiddy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 1,604
What's so special about photography? A writer describes a girl's suicide and publishes the story in a paper, and that's fine. But a photograph of the subject would be disrespectful?

I don't follow this logic.
__________________
--Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #16
Ducky
Registered User
 
Ducky's Avatar
 
Ducky is offline
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: North Texas (Richardson) near Dallas.
Posts: 1,275
I would not even consider it. Shameful.
__________________
At my age, morning is an exercise in memory.


My RF Gallery:

My Flickr:
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #17
bob338
Registered User
 
bob338's Avatar
 
bob338 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sausalito, CA
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by crawdiddy View Post
What's so special about photography? A writer describes a girl's suicide and publishes the story in a paper, and that's fine. But a photograph of the subject would be disrespectful?

I don't follow this logic.
the writer is reporting something that has already happened, he cannot do anything about it. the photographer is witness to the scene and probably able to intervene.

bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #18
crawdiddy
qu'est-ce que c'est?
 
crawdiddy's Avatar
 
crawdiddy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob338 View Post
the writer is reporting something that has already happened, he cannot do anything about it. the photographer is witness to the scene and probably able to intervene.

bob
So, you agree that if the girl is already pronounced dead, then there's no problem with photographing her?
__________________
--Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #19
J J Kapsberger
Registered User
 
J J Kapsberger's Avatar
 
J J Kapsberger is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Smith View Post
They weren't offending the coroner's morals - they were offending humanity's morals. That's assuming enough people have any morals left to actually constitute humanity as a whole still having morals.
You're assuming that your moral position holds for all of "humanity" and that the people taking the pictures acted in a manner that one should call immoral. You've touched on what is for me the most important philosophical question: was it really immoral—'ghoulish'—of them to take photos?

I tend to agree with oftheherd's position (see his post above): if, and only if, I knew that I couldn't offer any help, I wouldn't rule out taking a picture.

I certainly wouldn't take the picture for fun or entertainment.

However, I might consider it such an extraordinary and moving scene that I should capture it and contemplate it later on. The simple act of shooting a scene wouldn't inherently cause (further) harm to the girl.

One other consideration I'd have: I'd not wish to invoke the wrath of people gathered at the scene who would be offended by my taking a picture of her for whatever reason I choose, whether 'ghoulish' or not.
__________________
I love the smell of indicator stop bath in the morning...


My Flickr space
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #20
dcsang
Canadian & Not A Dentist
 
dcsang's Avatar
 
dcsang is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Toronto Canada
Age: 54
Posts: 4,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by crawdiddy View Post
What's so special about photography? A writer describes a girl's suicide and publishes the story in a paper, and that's fine. But a photograph of the subject would be disrespectful?

I don't follow this logic.
The writer is writing the story after the fact.
The people on the scene could have chosen to help (or at least respect the body even if the girl didn't respect it herself - i.e. suicide)

There's a clear difference between the two imho.

Dave
__________________
I own a Leica and I am NOT a dentist (I don't even portray one on TV!!!)

I have an idea what I'm looking for but it only becomes real once I see it - Constantine Manos

ITS THE MAGIC I SEE IN THE Light, Texture, & Tone
that Intoxicates Me - Helen Hill

My Flickr - it's where I post my RF and P&S shtuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #21
crawdiddy
qu'est-ce que c'est?
 
crawdiddy's Avatar
 
crawdiddy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcsang View Post
The writer is writing the story after the fact.
The people on the scene could have chosen to help (or at least respect the body even if the girl didn't respect it herself - i.e. suicide)

There's a clear difference between the two imho.

Dave
If the victim is dead, then the photographer is documenting the scene after the fact. How is this more disrespectful than writing a story about it, and publishing it in a paper for money?
__________________
--Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #22
bob338
Registered User
 
bob338's Avatar
 
bob338 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sausalito, CA
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by crawdiddy View Post
So, you agree that if the girl is already pronounced dead, then there's no problem with photographing her?
i don't think there is a moral question of photographing the dead. i do think there is a major moral question in photographing the about-to-be dead.

bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #23
bob338
Registered User
 
bob338's Avatar
 
bob338 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sausalito, CA
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by J J Kapsberger View Post
The simple act of shooting a scene wouldn't inherently cause (further) harm to the girl.
but the simple act of choosing to take a picture instead of helping her most certainly would further harm her.


bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #24
MartinP
Registered User
 
MartinP is offline
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 2,031
Quote:
Originally Posted by crawdiddy View Post
If the victim is dead, then the photographer is documenting the scene after the fact.
I disagree. That is the task of the police photographer and the processes that go along with the inquest. The people taking cameraphone snaps were probably (just a guess, but...) going to show them to their mates in the bar later. By that point the person was apparently beyond help, though it is likely none of those making photographs was medically qualified to make an examination to determine that fact, so a reasonable person might consider the effect on the family and friends of having their daughters corpse used for a laugh in a bar.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #25
back alley
IMAGES
 
back alley's Avatar
 
back alley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: true north strong & free
Posts: 49,241
would it be ok/better if it weren't a camera phone?
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #26
nikon_sam
Shooter of Film...
 
nikon_sam's Avatar
 
nikon_sam is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Alta Loma, CA
Age: 59
Posts: 4,968
Several years ago, while cycling, I came across the scene of a head-on crash...moments before I had been passed by one of the cars, a 1959 Austin-Healy...
When I arrived at the intersection I could not believe what was before me...the driver of the Austin-Healy had been ejected from the car (no seat belts and top down) as he lay on the street he was indeed dying due to massive internal and head injuries...I was kneeling next to him when I believe he passed...
Several minutes later the Medics arrived and within 5-10 minutes stopped working on him...
During this time I was directing traffic...this guy in a van drives by with his cell phone camera pointing out the window shooting the scene...well needless to say I was pissed...I was tempted to hit the side of the van as he drove by...

This made me rethink the times I have pointed a camera out the window when passing a similar scene...
If I come across an accident these days and I see no bodies but just damaged cars and the local police I might shoot...but I do remember how I felt when that guy stuck out his camera...
I wouldn't hesitate to help anyone in need whether I have a camera or not...

I wanted to add this...
In the local newspaper the following day they ran a story of this accident and I must say the photographer was very kind to the family of the deceased...the angle of the photo showed what it needed to without showing the worst of it...my hat is off to him/her...
__________________
Sam
"tongue tied & twisted
just an earthbound misfit...I..."
pf

Last edited by nikon_sam : 08-12-2010 at 11:05.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #27
photogdave
Shops local
 
photogdave is offline
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Film-filled Vancouver
Posts: 2,123
You have to draw a line somewhere. The reporter is reporting a news event. The story further reports on bullying, teen depression, and callous snapshooters. It is informational and helpful, if it leads to further exploration and discussion of theses issues, like we're doing here.
Citizens snapping photos of the girl, whether in the process of dying or already dead, is not helping anything or anyone.
__________________
Digital - I just don't care for it.

Leica M4, M6, CL
Voigtlander lenses
Pentax Optio 43 WR
Olympus Stylus Epic
Rolleiflex TLR
Nikon F100, D70

My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #28
crawdiddy
qu'est-ce que c'est?
 
crawdiddy's Avatar
 
crawdiddy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 1,604
And what does the family think about all of us reading the account in the niewspaper? What's the difference? Why is one disrespectful and the other acceptable?
__________________
--Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #29
photogdave
Shops local
 
photogdave is offline
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Film-filled Vancouver
Posts: 2,123
Quote:
Originally Posted by back alley View Post
would it be ok/better if it weren't a camera phone?
I really don't believe anyone was implying that.
__________________
Digital - I just don't care for it.

Leica M4, M6, CL
Voigtlander lenses
Pentax Optio 43 WR
Olympus Stylus Epic
Rolleiflex TLR
Nikon F100, D70

My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #30
photogdave
Shops local
 
photogdave is offline
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Film-filled Vancouver
Posts: 2,123
Quote:
Originally Posted by crawdiddy View Post
And what does the family think about all of us reading the account in the niewspaper? What's the difference? Why is one disrespectful and the other acceptable?
See my post above.
__________________
Digital - I just don't care for it.

Leica M4, M6, CL
Voigtlander lenses
Pentax Optio 43 WR
Olympus Stylus Epic
Rolleiflex TLR
Nikon F100, D70

My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #31
J J Kapsberger
Registered User
 
J J Kapsberger's Avatar
 
J J Kapsberger is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob338 View Post
but the simple act of choosing to take a picture instead of helping her most certainly would further harm her.


bob
Agreed, it would certainly be harm through negligence. So, I wouldn't chose taking a picture over helping her if I could in fact help her.

There's no indication in the article as to whether those who took the cell phone shots could've helped her but neglected to do so.
__________________
I love the smell of indicator stop bath in the morning...


My Flickr space
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #32
crawdiddy
qu'est-ce que c'est?
 
crawdiddy's Avatar
 
crawdiddy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by photogdave View Post
You have to draw a line somewhere. The reporter is reporting a news event. The story further reports on bullying, teen depression, and callous snapshooters. It is informational and helpful, if it leads to further exploration and discussion of theses issues, like we're doing here.
Citizens snapping photos of the girl, whether in the process of dying or already dead, is not helping anything or anyone.
What about amateur bloggers? Are they entitled to write about news events?

I'm not buying this at all.
__________________
--Dan

Last edited by crawdiddy : 08-12-2010 at 11:02.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #33
MartinP
Registered User
 
MartinP is offline
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 2,031
Quote:
Originally Posted by back alley View Post
would it be ok/better if it weren't a camera phone?
Is that supposed to be a serious question ? At the very least it suggests that you haven't read the article and is disappointing given your position.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #34
bob338
Registered User
 
bob338's Avatar
 
bob338 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sausalito, CA
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
Is that supposed to be a serious question ? At the very least it suggests that you haven't read the article and is disappointing given your position.
the question seemed a bit disrespectful to me too.

bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #35
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Santiago, Chile
Age: 46
Posts: 20,283
I couldn't do it... I couldn't even look at it to be honest.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #36
back alley
IMAGES
 
back alley's Avatar
 
back alley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: true north strong & free
Posts: 49,241
all the good and judgemental people...
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #37
crawdiddy
qu'est-ce que c'est?
 
crawdiddy's Avatar
 
crawdiddy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsrockit View Post
I couldn't do it... I couldn't even look at it to be honest.
But you'll read a story about it, right?
__________________
--Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #38
dcsang
Canadian & Not A Dentist
 
dcsang's Avatar
 
dcsang is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Toronto Canada
Age: 54
Posts: 4,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by crawdiddy View Post
If the victim is dead, then the photographer is documenting the scene after the fact. How is this more disrespectful than writing a story about it, and publishing it in a paper for money?
As mentioned, a police officer documenting the scene or a news reporter documenting the scene (however I know of no newspapers that would really outright show a suicide victim - but then again, I'm in North America.. perhaps there are papers elsewhere that actually would go ahead and show such a thing) is perfectly acceptable in my opinion.

A bypasser who happens upon the scene who could have offered help (either to the victim or the ex-boyfriend or family member) but instead decides to take out a camera phone (or point and shoot or Leica M or Bessa R or what have you) for no other reason than to say "Hey, look at this cool street scene I shot !!" has no respect for the dead (or about-to-be dead), no respect for the victim's family/friends that may be present or, for that matter, no respect for themselves.

Just my opinion mind you - I just wouldn't do it.

Dave
__________________
I own a Leica and I am NOT a dentist (I don't even portray one on TV!!!)

I have an idea what I'm looking for but it only becomes real once I see it - Constantine Manos

ITS THE MAGIC I SEE IN THE Light, Texture, & Tone
that Intoxicates Me - Helen Hill

My Flickr - it's where I post my RF and P&S shtuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #39
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,943
Dan has to be right, logically. It is hard to construct a logical framework in which it is OK to write about it (or even discuss it here) but not to take a picture. The Vox Pop 'I was there' is greatly encouraged by the media, and this pushes it further.

Emotionally, I have much less of a problem in understanding why I (and others) wouldn't/shouldn't take the pictures.

But who remembers the picture 10 or 20 years ago about the fellow who fell onto a spiked railing and had a spike through his lower jaw, like a badly hooked fish? It appeared, I believe, in several newspapers.

Cheers,

R.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-12-2010   #40
crawdiddy
qu'est-ce que c'est?
 
crawdiddy's Avatar
 
crawdiddy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 1,604
Do we consider photography to be too powerful? Is that why so many people say they would not photograph a corpse? And yet no one has said that it's wrong to write a sensational news story about a suicide.

Why is photography special? Are we afraid we'll steal their souls?
__________________
--Dan
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:36.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.