Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Image Processing: Darkroom / Lightroom / Film

Image Processing: Darkroom / Lightroom / Film Discuss Image processing -- traditional darkoom or digital lightroom here. Notice there are subcategories to narrow down subject matter. .

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Panasonic Introduces New 5-Megapixel Lumix Digital Still Camera With Leica Lens And F
Old 03-30-2004   #1
MP Guy
Just another face in the crowd
 
MP Guy's Avatar
 
MP Guy is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 2,468
Panasonic Introduces New 5-Megapixel Lumix Digital Still Camera With Leica Lens And F

Does this look familiar ?????

Panasonic Introduces New 5-Megapixel Lumix Digital Still Camera With Leica Lens And Full Manual Controls





LAS VEGAS, NV (February 13, 2004) - Once again Panasonic revolutionizes the world of digital photography with the new DMC-LC1 Lumix camera. The DMC-LC1 has a digital brain but the heart and soul of a finely crafted 35mm camera, right down to its controls. A true breakthrough in digital camera craftsmanship, the 5-megapixel DMC-LC1 brings a traditional photographic experience to the digital world, evoking the look, feel, precision, and responsiveness of a 35mm camera. Zoom, focus and aperture are manually controlled by ring settings on the lens; shutter speed is controlled by a dial located on the top of the unit. And, like all of Panasonic's Lumix models, the DMC-LC1 features a high-performance Leica lens for extraordinary image rendering.
The DMC-LC1 combines unrivalled Leica optics with Panasonic's most advanced digital electronic technology to create a camera that allows photographers to experience a new level of creative expression. The camera's full manual operation serves as a natural extension of the photographer's hands and eyes.

Leica lenses retain a legendary reputation for creating images that capture the most delicate nuances of light and shade, the elusive ambience of "air", and subtle gradations of color. The new DMC-LC1 incorporates a finely crafted, F2.0 - 2.4 Leica DC VARIO-SUMMICRON lens (13 elements in 10 groups) with zoom capability equivalent to 28 - 90mm on a 35mm camera.











Beyond the lens, Panasonic converts the optical data into digital information with unmatched processing speed. Panasonic's innovative Venus Engine LSI handles all image processing functions simultaneously -- from displaying the image on the LCD to writing data to the memory card -- as soon as the CCD captures the image signal. The result is superb image rendering and outstanding responsiveness.

The DMC-LC1 can capture image in the RAW format as well as Super Fine/Fine/Standard JPEG and QuickTime(r) motion JPEG images. Often referred to as a "digital negative," the raw file format stores uncompressed data directly off the camera's CCD with no in-camera processing. This raw image can then be manually manipulated in a photo editing program. Adobe announced at PMA today a free, updated version of the Camera Raw plug-in, which will provide integrated support of the Panasonic raw format within Adobe Photoshop® CS, the latest version of Adobe's professional image editing product.

The DMC-LC1 features a built-in USB port and SD Memory Card/Multimedia Card slot, offering consumers networking versatility with PCs and a wide variety of compatible SD-enabled devices.












Other features include:


Built-in pop-up flash which can tilt 45 degrees to create a bounce flash. The camera can also accept and synchronize with optional external flash units. Auto-flash and manual flash settings.

Red-eye compensation.

Large 2.5-inch LCD.

3.2x optical and 3x digital* zoom.

Burst shooting mode.

Real-time histogram.

Auto bracketing mode automatically takes three or five shots at different exposures.

Remote shutter helps prevent even slight shaking or vibration caused by contact with the camera.

Three light metering modes: Intelligent Multiple/Center Weighted/Spot

Microphone and speakers for audio recording.

Included accessories: Battery charger/AC adaptor, battery pack, SD Memory Card, AC cable, DC cable, lens cap, A/V cable, USB driver, USB connection cable, lens hood, hood cap, MC protector, remote shutter, strap, SD viewer software, ArcSoft editing software: ArcSoft PhotoBase(tm), ArcSoft PhotoImpression(tm), ArcSoft PhotoPrinter(tm) and ArcSoft Panorama Maker(tm).
The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LC1 is scheduled for March, 2004 delivery. It will have a manufacturer's suggested retail price of $1,599.00.

About Panasonic

Panasonic Consumer Electronics Company, Division of Matsu****a Electric Corporation of America, markets a broad line of digital and other consumer electronics products. Based in Secaucus, N.J., Matsu****a Electric Corporation of America is the principal North American subsidiary of Matsu****a Electric Industrial Co. Ltd. (NYSE: MC) and the hub of Panasonic's U.S. marketing, sales, service and R&D operations. Additional information on Matsu****a Electric Corporation of America and Panasonic is available at www.panasonic.com. Additional company information for journalists is available at www.panasonic.com/pressroom or through the company's toll-free fax-back system at 888-734-7490.

* As digital zoom increases, resolution significantly decreases.
** Manufacturer's suggested retail price. All prices are in U.S. dollars.

Leica is a registered trademark of Leica Microsystems IR GmbH. Summicron is a registered trademark of Leica Camera AG. The Leica DC lenses are manufactured using measurement instruments and a quality assurance system that have been certified by Leica Camera AG based on the company's quality standards.

QuickTime® is a registered trademark of Apple Computer Inc. in the United States and other countries.

Adobe Photoshop CS is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.

ArcSoft, the ArcSoft logo, ArcSoft PhotoImpression, ArcSoft PhotoPrinter , ArcSoft Panorama Maker, and ArcSoft PhotoBase are trademarks of ArcSoft, Inc.

All specifications are subject to change without notice.
__________________
-- JT

www.leicaimages.com
www.ZeissImages.com
www.l-mountimages.com

Developer of the RFF gallery Software and some other cool stuff.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-30-2004   #2
HelenB
Registered User
 
HelenB is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York & London
Posts: 68
I borrowed a Digilux 2 for a job at the weekend. When I tested it before the event I was astonished how good it was, and how easy it was to use - so much so that I dropped my plan of taking an M7 along as well.

The Panasonic version only differs in body shape and bundled software as far as I know. A great camera.

One of my colleagues was using a Canon 1Ds. He looked at my pictures and commented that they were better than his. I'd be happy to post some, but does a D2 count as a rangefinder?

Best,
Helen
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=224'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-31-2004   #3
SolaresLarrave
My M5s need red dots!
 
SolaresLarrave's Avatar
 
SolaresLarrave is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: DeKalb, IL, USA
Age: 60
Posts: 7,499
Helen, in the interest of science, please, go ahead, make my day...

Just do it!

Thanks in advance! A big lot!!
__________________
-Francisco
Check out
My Leica M4-2 Blog and/or
My Nikon D700 Neophyte's Guide
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-31-2004   #4
HelenB
Registered User
 
HelenB is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York & London
Posts: 68
Hi Francisco,

I've put four into the 'People' gallery. They haven't been Photoshopped at all, only resized, Let me know if you want any more!

Best wishes,
Helen
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=224'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-31-2004   #5
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central Washington, USA
Posts: 13,425
Interesting stuff, Helen! Very nicely done, too, especially considering the slow shutter. ISO 200 puts a strain on the illumination level... Did you find 400 too noisy?
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-02-2004   #6
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central Washington, USA
Posts: 13,425
Bryan, I believe it has an electronic viewfinder, picking up the image from the digital sensor, so it's effectively an SLR in its view of the scene, only dependent upon the response speed of the viewfinder display screen. What appears to be an optical viewfinder window on the front of the camera is actually something else...
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-03-2004   #7
HelenB
Registered User
 
HelenB is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York & London
Posts: 68
Bryan,
Doug is right - especially when he says 'dependent upon the response speed of the viewfinder display screen'.

This is the first still camera I've used that has an electronic viewfinder. As with all viewing systems there are advantages and disadvantages, and the refresh rate (response speed) is the biggest disadvantage.

It behaves like the viewing screen on the back of the Digilux 1, for example - ie it is like a video camera with a variable frame rate, and the frame rate changes with the amount of light hitting the CCD. So in lower light levels you are watching a jerky movie, and you are watching the History Channel. No good for getting 'the moment'. There are also problems in very low light levels - you can't see anything through the viewfinder. There is a lower limit to the refresh rate - my guess is that it is about 8 or 10 frames per second (don't have the camera to hand to check exactly).

An accessory viewfinder could be one answer. That seems to suit some people very well. So far I have been happy to keep both eyes open. This is not a great method because the viewfinder image is less than life size zoomed in (90 mm equiv.) and much less than life size zoomed out (28 mm equiv.). The camera also obscures a lot of my left-eye view if I can see the whole viewfinder image with my right eye (I wear glasses). I found myself using a wide frame to allow for framing inaccuracy and pretty much ignoring the viewfinder image after I had framed - just looking at the live scene with my left eye. I hope that the pictures I've posted show that this worked well enough.


Manual focussing: When you touch the focussing ring (the middle ring on the lens: they go aperture, focus, zoom from back to front) there is the option of a pop-up magnified section (centre insert or full screen) to assist with focussing. I found this to work quite well. I noticed a 'peaking' effect (the over-enhancement of sharp edges) similar to professional video finders. I wanted it to go away faster than it did after I stopped moving the focus ring.

The noise at 400 isn't bad. I could live with it - in fact I haven't bothered to do a Neat Image* profile yet. It doesn't have the distinct linear pattern that the D1 has. I used 200 because I could.

I'll post an example at 400, one that also uses the on-camera flash. Later note: this is now in my Member's Gallery.

Enough for now. Let me know if there are any other aspects of operation and use that you would like my unreliable opinion and vague impressions of!

Best,
Helen

* a piece of software that does a good job or removing noise, supposedly similar in quality to Noise Ninja.

Last edited by HelenB : 04-03-2004 at 07:58.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-03-2004   #8
HelenB
Registered User
 
HelenB is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York & London
Posts: 68
I should have mentioned that the camera works at open aperture until you press the shutter release half way, when the iris motor stops it down. This is slower than any SLR I've ever used and so if you want the shortest possible lag at anything other than wide open you would have to have the shutter release pressed half way. The delay at f/11 is appreciable - I'd estimate that it's over half a second.

Best,
Helen
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=224'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-03-2004   #9
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central Washington, USA
Posts: 13,425
Thanks for the hands-on info, Helen. You've answered some questions I didn't think to ask, and it is interesting to get a "feel" for how it works. I'm amazed at the aperture delay. Perhaps delay and slow response is something one has to "learn to love", what with AF time and the electronic viewfinder refresh...
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-03-2004   #10
HelenB
Registered User
 
HelenB is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York & London
Posts: 68
Doug,

I was also surprised by the aperture delay when I stopped down just to f/5.6. I wondered what was happening - why was I missing every shot even though everything was in manual?

Overall I liked the camera very much - but, as you suggest, it has some quirks that one needs to get used to.

Best,
Helen
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=224'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-03-2004   #11
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central Washington, USA
Posts: 13,425
The closing of the aperture from full-open to the taking position wouldn't be necessary except for the electronic viewfinder, which is also saddled with the refresh lag. From what you say, these two delays would trade off somewhat, as the refresh is faster in bright light where the aperture lags more.

But both wpould be absent in a cam with an optical viewfinder, wouldn't they? Or does the aperture still do its dance for the "live" external LCD... :-(

At least the forthcoming Epson "Bessa-D" should be free of these delays as well as the AF!
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-05-2004   #12
mothra
 
Posts: n/a
Perhaps delay and slow response is something one has to "learn to love"

Not likely....
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-05-2004   #13
HelenB
Registered User
 
HelenB is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York & London
Posts: 68
As I hope my pictures (especially the one where I caught someone else's flash) demonstrate, it is possible to use the D2 without suffering any appreciable delays - so there is no need to learn to love them, just to learn to avoid them.

Best,
Helen
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=224'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-06-2004   #14
strangedoctor
 
Posts: n/a
This electronic viewfinder thing sounds absolutely absurd. All of that techno-waste, essentially a tv screen inside a viewfinder, a lens that barely needs focusing since everything's practically in focus. What a joke.
How is it that they got away with the little Rollei 35 in the 60s, with no rangefinder and a single focal length? You don't need anything else. Give us a digital Rollei, someone.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-06-2004   #15
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central Washington, USA
Posts: 13,425
Helen, you seem reasonably positive about the Digilux 2, and it does indeed seem an improvement over many other digital cameras, especially regarding the interface. From your experience, can you suggest some techniques to minimize the effects of various lags in the Digilux?

I have recently been using a Fuji GA645Wi that has auto exposure, motorized film wind & lens retraction... And auto--focus, also motorized of course. The auto-focus has the expected delay, so I typically line up on an item within the scene I want to focus on, press the shutter button half way to lock in the focus and exposure, reframe and then choose the moment of exposure. This seems to work pretty well, and is actually faster than manual focus.

The big downside to this is that, now mentally contaminated by all this automation, with a fully manual camera I forget to set exposure, wind film and even neglect to focus! Arggghh; brain rot sets in...
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2004   #16
HelenB
Registered User
 
HelenB is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York & London
Posts: 68
Hi Doug,

Sorry to have not replied sooner, but I wanted to do some rudimentary tests of the delay in actual use, rather than quote Leica's numbers and theory.

I used a Metz flashgun on 1/256 power, first 'curtain' sync, manual focus, shutter release pressed half-way. Ambient lighting sufficient to give 1/30 at f/4 with EI400. Auto exposure.

Here's what I found:
Time between a randomly-timed event and the flash firing: 0.32 to 0.35 seconds (ie my reaction time + camera lag)
Time for an anticipated event: 0.14 to 0.16 s (ie mostly camera lag, but some of my reaction time as well). Leica's quoted shutter lag is 0.094 s.

These were quite consistent over a series of tests. I wasn't at my sharpest - slight headache at the end of a day spent doing my taxes!

So, the answer to your question is: use the camera in manual focus, press the shutter release part way (so far very similar to the way you use your Fuji) and keep both eyes open. I do that with my Ms anyway, so I have had plenty of practice.

Having started this, I'm now interested to see what results I get with an M.

I am quite positive about the D2 and I find it a joy to use. A lot of people seem to have had preconceived notions about what it should do and how it should handle, instead of approaching it with an open mind. It isn't a digital M7, but it does fit more with the rangefinder way of doing things than other digital cameras. It is a good camera in its own right, with good points and bad points, just like any other camera I've ever used. It complements, rather than replaces, a film-eating rangefinder camera.

It might be better to get the Panasonic version, then one wouldn't be burdened with all 'The Leica Way' hoo-ha.

It is a refreshingly different digital camera - one that departs from the current herd. One of the reasons I am unlikely to go fully digital for a long time is nothing to do with image quality - it is to do with the availability of cameras that suit a particular way of working. There is no digital Mamiya 6 or Makina 67, no digital Rolleiflex TLR - I'm sure that the members of this forum can add to the list.

Best,
Helen
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=224'>My Gallery</a>

Last edited by HelenB : 04-10-2004 at 16:52.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2004   #17
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central Washington, USA
Posts: 13,425
Thanks for the commentary, Helen, and the timing info puts the lag into perspective.

I know just what you mean about 'a particular way of working' as it seems there's a bunch of film users who'd be open to digital if only most of that 'way of working' could be maintained. Fortunately, Cosina and Leica have been listening.

I was surprised at how readily my wife switched from a pair of Pentax LXs and a bag full of gear to one of those swiveling Nikon digitals. She loves gadgets, and dived right into the mainstream market. As this market gets saturated, we niche-dwellers may see more stuff to tempt us!
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-20-2005   #18
djon
Registered User
 
djon is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico USA
Posts: 806
I'd totally convert to digital if Leica-sized versions offered manual focus, manual zoom, and instant shutters... I've found it impossible to photograph kids up close with digital cameras because they're gigantic, weird looking, and creepy slow...kids expressions flit here and there instantly while the camera's computer ponders its multiple navels. The Canon 20D is great as a technical device but it's a plastic turkey when compared with virtually any rangefinder 35. And it obviously beats Nikon, not to mention Leica's ridiculous efforts.

Sony may come to the rescue...the new M1 hints at good things to come. It's already superior in most traditional Leica respects to the digital Leica.
  Reply With Quote

Lumix & Sony
Old 02-20-2005   #19
yossarian
-
 
yossarian is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Merritt Island, FL
Age: 67
Posts: 399
Lumix & Sony

djon,
I was at PMA today and sat in on a press conference Panasonic had regarding the Lumix line. They are claiming a shutter lag of 8 milliseconds for the new model, though no mention was made of start-up time. It appears that every future Lumix will have their image stabilizer, even entry levels. Last year I finally bought my first digital--an FZ3, and I've had great fun with it, but there are autofocus issues which must be addressed--it can be slow and erratic at times. Overall I have a good feeling about where they are headed, especially now that they have officially signed on as a "four-thirds" member.
I looked at the Sony you mentioned, and it shows a lot of promise; it has a gloriously large LCD. But there is one genuine oddity--the lens. It is NOT Carl Zeiss, but rather just Sony (this could mean Tamron, if it's like what they did with camcorders).
If one were to gather up only the compact DCs in that convention center, it would probably take three boxcars to haul them away. There must have been two dozen "no-name" Chinese companies there, plus Premier, which OEMs for every major name on the planet.
"My kingdom for a cheap, all manual RF".
yossarian
  Reply With Quote

Digital Rollei
Old 07-03-2006   #20
Greg_E
Registered User
 
Greg_E's Avatar
 
Greg_E is offline
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 50
Digital Rollei

Quote:
Originally Posted by HelenB
It is a refreshingly different digital camera - one that departs from the current herd. One of the reasons I am unlikely to go fully digital for a long time is nothing to do with image quality - it is to do with the availability of cameras that suit a particular way of working. There is no digital Mamiya 6 or Makina 67, no digital Rolleiflex TLR - I'm sure that the members of this forum can add to the list.

Best,
Helen
Obviously I pulled this up from a search, as it is two years old. I just wanted to say that it can be done, though it may not be practicle.

I am currently myself building a 6mp digital Rolleicord. Why you ask? Why not? Now before you go comparing this to that minidigi toy, you should look at the toy's specs. It is not a real TLR, it uses an EVF and the "viewing" lens is only for show. It is also a fixed focus lens, which is a real shame, if it had real focus I would have bought one by now.

Now like it, hate it, or think it is a complete waste of time and materials... I'll still have a unique camera:


I assure you that this is not a bit of photoshop trickery! This is a first stage prototype camera. I'm waiting for a software upgrade from the back manufacturer, and a new machine tool to make a couple of parts. It will work correctly when I'm done! The only part that won't be great is the crop from the smaller CCD, but I tend to like a short tele anyway.

A Mamiya 7 that will be capable of using a 39mp back might be next.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-03-2006   #21
mac_wt
Cameras are like bunnies
 
mac_wt's Avatar
 
mac_wt is offline
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Boom, Belgium
Age: 49
Posts: 384
You've got my attention. Can you tell a bit more about the components you use in this project? Do you use some kind of medium format back (with only 6 mp; what back is that?)? Will it be portable in the end, or does it need an external power supply?

Wim
__________________
My Flickr gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-03-2006   #22
John
Registered User
 
John is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Manitoulin Island, Ontario
Posts: 313
Welcome to the forum. Keep us updated. What type of back? No. of MP? Your cost? How long did it take? Thanks.
__________________
______________________
Summaron 35/3.5, Jupiter J8 50/2, Industar 61LD 55/2.8,

Contax G2, Planar 45/2.0, Sonnar 90/2.8
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-03-2006   #23
Greg_E
Registered User
 
Greg_E's Avatar
 
Greg_E is offline
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 50
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...006#post331006
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LEICA MP, a new tool for professional and dedicated amateur photographers MP Guy Leica M Film Cameras 32 01-04-2016 06:21
Leica Digilux 2 MP Guy Rangefinder Photography Discussion 12 08-18-2007 19:35
LEICA DIGITAL-MODUL-R in preparation MP Guy Off Topic 4 05-15-2006 08:13
Epson Launches the World's First Rangefinder Digital Camera MP Guy Rangefinder Photography Discussion 25 11-17-2004 07:16
Leica SLR digital camera MP Guy Rangefinder Photography Discussion 0 10-02-2003 14:26



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:56.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.