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Bill Pierce - Leica M photog and author

 

“Our autobiography is written in our contact sheets,  and our opinion of the world in our selects”  

"Never ever confuse sharp with good, or you will end up shaving with an ice cream cone and licking a razor blade."  

 

Bill Pierce is one of the most successful Leica photographers and authors ever. I initially "met" Bill in the wonderful 1973 15th edition Leica Manual (the one with the M5 on the cover). I kept reading and re-reading his four chapters, continually amazed at his knoweldge and ability, thinking "if I only knew a small part of what this guy knows... wow."  I looked foward to his monthly columns in Camera 35 and devoured them like a starving man.  Bill has worked as a photojournalist  for 25 years, keyword: WORK.  Many photogs dream of the professional photographer's  life that Bill has earned and enjoyed.  Probably Bill's most famous pic is Nixon departing the White House for the last time, victory signs still waving. 

 

Bill  has been published in many major magazines, including  Time, Life, Newsweek, U.S. News, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, New York Magazine, Stern, L'Express and Paris Match.  :His published books include  The Leica Manual,  War Torn, Survivors and Victims in the Late 20th Century, Homeless in America,  Human Rights in China,  Children of War.  Add to that numerous exhibitions at major galleries and museums.  Magazine contributions include  Popular Photography,  Camera 35, Leica Manual,  Photo District News, the Encyclopedia of Brittanica, the Digital Journalist, and now RFF.  Major awards include Leica Medal of Excellence, Overseas Press Club's Oliver Rebbot Award for Best Photojournalism from Abroad,  and the World Press Photo's Budapest Award. Perhaps an ever bigger award is Tom Abrahamsson's comment: "If you want to know Rodinal, ask Bill."

 

I met Bill in person through our mutual friend Tom Abrahamsson.  In person his insight and comments are every bit as interesting and engaging as his writing.  He is a great guy who really KNOWS photography.  I am happy to say he has generously agreed to host this forum at RFF  From time to time Bill will bring up topics, but you are also invited to ask questions.  Sit down and enjoy the ride!

 


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Old 01-10-2018   #41
Ronald M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
For black and white, silver prints are more archival IF they're on Fiber Base paper AND they're processed properly.

The inks used in inkjet prints will eventually fade, though current pigment inks are very durable. Silver-gelatin images are made of tiny particles of silver metal, so as long as the print was properly processed and the print is not exposed to atmospheric pollution, the prints will never fade.
Spent a lot of $ on digital and love it for speed and the ability to manipulate. Downside is I must turn it over to someone else for finishing so I lose control. Can not afford a laser printer or have space for one. Ink is just ink. Printers dry up and cost way to much for low volume.

Bottom line I resurrected my Zone 6 and film Leicas and bought a bunch of Nikon F2. Already had lenses for them.

Darkroom is up and running after years of no use.

Color is digital and printed at a pro lab.
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Old 01-10-2018   #42
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I use 3" metal edge drop front boxes from Archival Methods. They are available for prints up to 20x24.
Print File and University Products also carry the same boxes. University has it up to 23x31", Print File has it up to 22x28". Each has discounts for the more you purchase.
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Old 01-10-2018   #43
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John,

You are my inspiration.

For those that don't know John's work, he uses books to edit mucho images.

John I consider not only a photographer, but also a book artist. He has his own style.

Cal
Thanks for the kind words Cal! I'm trying to be at least...
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Old 01-11-2018   #44
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B&H has archival Lineco boxes up to 23x31x3. Prices vary by color (oddly enough). Right now the lowest price for the largest box is the blue/gray color--a bit cheaper than the Archival Methods brand equivalent size (at least for single boxes).

I use Lineco boxes and they seem fine to me. Amazon sometimes has them at even lower prices.

As to the cost of inkjet printing, it's certainly no worse than the cost of printing in the darkroom. Remember the cost of chemicals, film and paper? Before I shut down my home darkroom, "high quality" fiber based paper was becoming very expensive while that
so-called high quality was declining significantly. That was extremely frustrating to me. No doubt pigment inks and high rag content art papers are expensive too but once you get your printing mojo going there's less waste involved and a lot less time as well. Plus you get a wide choice of papers--art papers that have been in use for centuries that have been modified for inkjet uses.
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Old 01-11-2018   #45
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Thanks for the kind words Cal! I'm trying to be at least...
John,

Your influence has to be noted. You helped me grow as an artist. Sometime one needs someone to give that gentle and sometimes not so gentile push.

Also your sense of style makes you stand alone. I appreciate this the most. Not easy to stand alone.

Cal
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Old 01-11-2018   #46
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Quote:
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B&H has archival Lineco boxes up to 23x31x3. Prices vary by color (oddly enough). Right now the lowest price for the largest box is the blue/gray color--a bit cheaper than the Archival Methods brand equivalent size (at least for single boxes).

I use Lineco boxes and they seem fine to me. Amazon sometimes has them at even lower prices.

As to the cost of inkjet printing, it's certainly no worse than the cost of printing in the darkroom. Remember the cost of chemicals, film and paper? Before I shut down my home darkroom, "high quality" fiber based paper was becoming very expensive while that
so-called high quality was declining significantly. That was extremely frustrating to me. No doubt pigment inks and high rag content art papers are expensive too but once you get your printing mojo going there's less waste involved and a lot less time as well. Plus you get a wide choice of papers--art papers that have been in use for centuries that have been modified for inkjet uses.
Thanks to everyone for the storage suggestions!

Inkjet papers have really become something to behold.

I printed my last gallery show (2017 Cuba photographs) on Hahnemühle bamboo paper, and to my eyes, they're the best-looing prints I've ever made (And I used to use Zone VI's Brilliant paper back in the day).
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Old 01-11-2018   #47
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Originally Posted by maggieo View Post
Thanks to everyone for the storage suggestions!

Inkjet papers have really become something to behold.

I printed my last gallery show (2017 Cuba photographs) on Hahnemühle bamboo paper, and to my eyes, they're the best-looing prints I've ever made (And I used to use Zone VI's Brilliant paper back in the day).
Maggieo,

Would love to see those prints.

I think printing makes one a better photographer. Not the same when someone else prints my work. It seems I like control of my own vision.

At a gallery workshop I learned that artist that print their own work don't enjoy any premium pricing because collectors and dealers assume that a third party printer is under the direction and is supervised by the photographer. I was disappointed to hear this.

Also today there no longer exists a premium pricing on silver wet prints.

With clients where I print for other artists I always get them involved in the process. More or less I am just a tool to convey their vision. I try to get them involved in the process AMAP.

Cal
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Old 01-11-2018   #48
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If you're anywhere near Lincoln Cal, let me know!
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Old 01-11-2018   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maggieo View Post
Thanks to everyone for the storage suggestions!

Inkjet papers have really become something to behold.

I printed my last gallery show (2017 Cuba photographs) on Hahnemühle bamboo paper, and to my eyes, they're the best-looing prints I've ever made (And I used to use Zone VI's Brilliant paper back in the day).
Hahnemuhle's Bamboo paper is sweet with that different but beautiful texture. I recently tried Awagami washi bamboo. It has a more traditional texture and I think it looks great with photos that have subdued or pastel colors.

I also like Hahnemuhle's Museum Etching for a more traditional and more heavily textured paper. But I generally print on Epson Hot Press Natural because I like a smoother texture and HPN is usually a bit cheaper but gorgeous just the same. Other smoother surface papers I've tried and like are Canson's Rag Photographique, Velin Museum Rag (previously designated "Arches Museum Rag") and Printmaking Rag (previously designated "BFK Rives"). These are all more expensive than Epson HPN unless you find them on sale. They all have great tonality with B&W and also print color well.

Last edited by Dogman : 01-14-2018 at 13:44. Reason: Typo: change "Canon" to "Canson"...there is a difference!
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Old 01-12-2018   #50
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Are the bamboo papers matte?

Thanks in advance.

Cal
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Old 01-12-2018   #51
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Are the bamboo papers matte?

Thanks in advance.

Cal
Cal, they're a semi-smooth matte surface. The structure of the fiber is unique. The Hahnemuhle bamboo has a little more texture from the bamboo fibers than the Awagami bamboo I've tried.
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Old 01-12-2018   #52
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Cal, they're a semi-smooth matte surface. The structure of the fiber is unique. The Hahnemuhle bamboo has a little more texture from the bamboo fibers than the Awagami bamboo I've tried.
D-M,

Thanks. Great info.

I have been noticing the buzz about bamboo papers. Really interesting.

Cal
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Old 01-13-2018   #53
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Do any of you have any experience with metal prints?

I know absolutely nothing about them but have seen several magazine ads for them.
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Old 01-14-2018   #54
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I had Precision Camera in Austin do a B&W metal print for one of my commissions and it it was spectacular.
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Old 01-14-2018   #55
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What is a "metal print"? I've never heard of it.

Erik.
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Old 01-14-2018   #56
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Thanks, Maggie. I have seen a few of these that were printed in color and found the detail in the images to be excellent. That is great news that you had a B&W print made, because all I shoot and print is B&W, digitally. I have never seen a B&W image printed on metal, so I ordered a print from Bay Photo. It should be here in a few days.

Erik, the images are printed or fused into a piece of aluminum. The print can be mounted several ways, including a "floating" mount that makes the image appear to be slightly floating off the wall. There is no need for matting or framing the print, unless you want to. Supposedly, they are as archival as the best processed fiber based prints. That part is what worries me, but we shall see.

Since I shut my darkroom down several years ago, I have contracted out the printing of my images and have been happy, overall, with the results. But after viewing some of these metal prints in person and seeing the quality, I really have my hopes up for this process.

Visit Bay Photo's website, or Precision Camera's website, for more details. They are a bit more expensive than normal paper prints, but if the quality is there for such a unique product, then it may well be worth it.
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Old 01-14-2018   #57
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Quote:
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Hahnemuhle's Bamboo paper is sweet with that different but beautiful texture. I recently tried Awagami washi bamboo. It has a more traditional texture and I think it looks great with photos that have subdued or pastel colors.

I also like Hahnemuhle's Museum Etching for a more traditional and more heavily textured paper. But I generally print on Epson Hot Press Natural because I like a smoother texture and HPN is usually a bit cheaper but gorgeous just the same. Other smoother surface papers I've tried and like are Canon's Rag Photographique, Velin Museum Rag (previously designated "Arches Museum Rag") and Printmaking Rag (previously designated "BFK Rives"). These are all more expensive than Epson HPN unless you find them on sale. They all have great tonality with B&W and also print color well.
Thank you for this info! Very helpful.
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Old 01-14-2018   #58
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I am a very recent convert to printing. Back in the day I only shot Kodachrome and projected it. Since I came back to photography a few years ago I've been happy to view my B&W photos on the computer and post online. However, I recently did four prints that my wife wanted for a wall in our living room. I printed straight from Lightroom on Canon A4 Semi-Gloss at 240dpi on a very ordinary inkjet printer and was absolutely blown away by the results. The photos look just so much better than they ever did on the screen with much better tonal gradation and clarity. I'm really looking forward to trying different papers and upgrading to a better printer. I've come to the realisation that it's not a photo unless it's printed .

cheers,
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Old 01-14-2018   #59
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the images are printed or fused into a piece of aluminum.
Thank you, Rick, for your explanation. I took a look at it. I hope to see an example soon here in Europe.

Erik.
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Old 01-14-2018   #60
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I'm feeling significantly poorer after just submitting a huge order for prints and frames. It's been a few years since my last print / frame order, so had a lot to cover, but OYE.
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Old 01-14-2018   #61
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The thing with dye-sublimation metal prints is that they haven't been extensively tested for archival quality. bayphoto's own longevity test on their wesbite shows that the magenta dyes fade at a much faster rate than cyan or yellow, so it's possible that a metal print will turn greenish over time.
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Old 01-14-2018   #62
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If I get a chance, I'll try to get a photo of the metal print I got from Precision.
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Old 01-16-2018   #63
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What is a "metal print"? I've never heard of it.

Erik.
Erik,

Pretty much is a dye sublimation on a metal panel like aluminum.

The flat sheet of metal floats due to the back structural support that has a smaller perimeter than the print. No framing and no borders. Printed with a bleeding edge.

This process enhances contrast and in color the tones get saturated. Wonderfull clean modern look with the right image and rather striking when well done, but I would not want to print all my work in this manner. Works great where high contrast and saturation enhance the image.

Last year at Photoville I spun a wheel of fortune at the Duggal booth and won a metal print offer. For $98.00 I could of gotten one of my images made in a metal print with backing which normally would of cost over $300.00. I ended up giving my prize to Steve at the NYC Meet-Up. The size was smaller than 20x30.

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Old 01-16-2018   #64
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If I get a chance, I'll try to get a photo of the metal print I got from Precision.
M,

I bet some of those shots from Cuba look great on metal panel prints due to color saturation. That Cuban light is special.

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Old 01-16-2018   #65
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I've had metallic prints done by WHCC and, while I don't know the composition of the material, it's not metal. I suspect it's a surface finish that is designed to simulate metal. The prints are indeed luminous.

I know folks now actually print on metal surfaces, but that's a different thing.

John
John,

At Duggal it was aluminum and they advertise it as so. Of course other substraights can be used.

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Old 01-16-2018   #66
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M,

I bet some of those shots from Cuba look great on metal panel prints due to color saturation. That Cuban light is special.

Cal
Thank you, Cal!

You know, I've only printed my Cuba photos on the Hahnemühle bamboo paper. I'll have to give one of Precision's metal prints a shot.

Any suggestions for which one to be my test print? Here's my Flickr album of them.
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Old 01-16-2018   #67
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Thank you, Cal!

You know, I've only printed my Cuba photos on the Hahnemühle bamboo paper. I'll have to give one of Precision's metal prints a shot.

Any suggestions for which one to be my test print? Here's my Flickr album of them.
Maggie,

I think because the metal prints I saw from Duggal on aluminum saturates color and adds contrast to heighten realty I think the drama in these three shot would be my pick.

Not in any order: Woman holding rooster; Female boxer on ropes; and Nose of 50's Chevy on a car lift.

I think shooting with Peter Turnley in Cuba must of been a great experience. I went to hear Peter speak at the Leica Gallery in SoHo. I modest and humble man. I loved his work on Cuba.

Loved that he work on a road crew to save enough money to take a trip to Paris and never came back.

Cal
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Old 01-16-2018   #68
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Coming back to the book idea...

I haven't printed in a few years, but I'm due to get back into it soon. Having said that, I settled into to using Hahnemuhle's fine art leather ink jet photo albums. Basically it's double sided photo rag in a post binder. The post is decent as you can reorder the prints if you want later, i.e. the binding isn't perm. The quality of the leather is also decent. I was using B&W prints with Eboni-6 inks

Funny thing is, I landed on that solution as a function of
- the best user experience by hand held and flipping through pages
- relatively "cheap" as it's two sided and the binding also covers the cost of plastic sleeves and storage boxes

More recently I've used DSCL in the UK for their luxury book option. It's ok. It's still pricy, I've start to use custom layouts for each page varying the size and location to get full use of the page/space -- but that's a major time investment to set up.

I want to go back to the Hahnemuhle photo option and do it myself. Ideally I'd move to the new ultra back HD peizography inks for B&W and the new Epson inks for colour. The downside is that I don't print often and had lots of ink clogs and spillage spoiling papers and wasted too much time with purging and head cleans.

Yes, print size is overrated. Hard to display, transport, share and store. I started to standardise on 10 inch max width for A4 with most prints in 2:3 ratio giving 10x6.67 picture size. That lets fingerprints stay on the white edges and not in the picture. For A3 it'd be 15x10 picture size. A3 book is getting a bit sloppy/big to pick up and page through for reader without.
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Old 01-16-2018   #69
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Coming back to the book idea...

I haven't printed in a few years, but I'm due to get back into it soon. Having said that, I settled into to using Hahnemuhle's fine art leather ink jet photo albums. Basically it's double sided photo rag in a post binder. The post is decent as you can reorder the prints if you want later, i.e. the binding isn't perm. The quality of the leather is also decent. I was using B&W prints with Eboni-6 inks

Funny thing is, I landed on that solution as a function of
- the best user experience by hand held and flipping through pages
- relatively "cheap" as it's two sided and the binding also covers the cost of plastic sleeves and storage boxes

More recently I've used DSCL in the UK for their luxury book option. It's ok. It's still pricy, I've start to use custom layouts for each page varying the size and location to get full use of the page/space -- but that's a major time investment to set up.

I want to go back to the Hahnemuhle photo option and do it myself. Ideally I'd move to the new ultra back HD peizography inks for B&W and the new Epson inks for colour. The downside is that I don't print often and had lots of ink clogs and spillage spoiling papers and wasted too much time with purging and head cleans.

Yes, print size is overrated. Hard to display, transport, share and store. I started to standardise on 10 inch max width for A4 with most prints in 2:3 ratio giving 10x6.67 picture size. That lets fingerprints stay on the white edges and not in the picture. For A3 it'd be 15x10 picture size. A3 book is getting a bit sloppy/big to pick up and page through for reader without.
RB,

For readers as I remember Hahnemuele offered covers and pages separately. Am I remembering correctly?

I use the new Piezography Pro. In fact I was invited to be an "early adopter" and had this new inkset before it was available to the general public. What is so great about PP is if you print glossy it is "one pass printing." Really works well on the Baryta coated papers I favor. Another feature in PP is blending a splitone in the print head. The Photoblack from this inkset is mucho dark. Really expands dynamic range.

Previously I printed Piezography K-7, but for printing huge I will load my 7800 with "Enhanced K-7 High Density" which is basically my old K-7 with the new blacker-black. I blend my own custom split tone with Selenium highlights and Warm Neutral shadows. I tend to make the transition in the mids as broad as possible. I think Enhanced K-7 HD is best exploited on huge prints.

For color I would try to secure a 3880 so I could load third party inks, and I would use Jon Cone color archival pigment inks. The 3880 that is no longer in production has a long print head life and is a real workhorse. Mine is over three years old and is running strong. Also know that the newer inks from Jon Cone seem less prone to clogging. The cost when compared to OEM Epson is about 1/10th the cost per ml. Pigments are encapsulated just like Epson and in fact can be mixed with Epson inks. Of course best results when using Jon Cone profiles from their library.

I use Piezoflush to store my 7800. Not so wealthy to run it all year round. This is good maintenance. One year I spent $10K on paper and ink. Ouch. Running two big printers is not inexpensive, but I tend to bulk up to save money.

Some printers use the K-7 gloss overcoat over their color prints. It is said that this enhances detail, adds contrast, and saturation. Perhaps a step toward that metalic print look.

Big prints have a billboard like effect. They capture a viewer from a distance and invite one for a closer view. Definitely a big impact, and not the same intimate experience of holding a print or book in your hands. Printing for exhibition is a different experience and challenge.

Cal
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Old 01-16-2018   #70
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Cal,

I have a 3880 and am now using Jon Cone's color inks. I am not familiar with the K-7 gloss overcoat for color prints you mentioned. Can you elaborate?
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Old 01-16-2018   #71
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Cal,

I have a 3880 and am now using Jon Cone's color inks. I am not familiar with the K-7 gloss overcoat for color prints you mentioned. Can you elaborate?
PTP,

I learned about this from the Piezography Forum.

I'm a B&W printer. My old K-7 process uses 7 shades of black to print my B&W images. For glossy printing a cover layer of "Gloss Overcoat" is required, so glossy printing is a two step process: first printing is 7 shades of black; then after drying a layer of "Gloss Overcoat" is printed.

The effect is that the contrast fully emerges and so does the shadow detail. Any gloss differential or bronzing disappears. There is an additional benefit is that the "GO" protects the pigment underneath and makes the prints to handle a lot of handling.

At NYC Meet-Ups I spit on one of my prints and squeege the wet print with my hand as a display of the added durability. Also there have been accidents where I have actually drooled on my prints inadvertantly. LOL.

So on the Piezography Forums some color printers rave about Gloss Overcoating their color prints for added detail, added saturation, added contrast, and added durability.

At Piezography they actually use a printer loaded with "GO" in all channels for fast and easy application. They also can remap a printer with a dead nozzle for this purpose.

In real life in my 3880 I got "Pizza Wheels" which were only apparent in areas laden with blacks or vast amounts of shadows as an artifact. Basically the paper transport leaves/creates an artifact. I got a workaround from Walter Blackwell that uses the rear loading, but disables the pin wheels that creates the Pizza Wheels. realize that this artifact is because of heavy ink load, and with Piezography this is where the expanded tone comes from.

If you like PM me. When I load my 7800 with Enhanced K-7 I could apply a coat of "GO" over one of your color prints. Soon I will be loading the printer I affectionately named "The Jersey Barrier" because of its size. Realize that I have a 3880 and a 7800 in a one bedroom luxury apartment in Madhattan. and that my gal is a famous Fashion Blogger. I don't know which is is more clutter, her clothes and shoes, or my printing stuff.

So anyways I have a client waiting for me to print 20x30's on 24x36. Doing unidirectional at 2880 takes about 44 minutes for just one pass. I like to wait a full day for the 7 shades of black to fully cure before printing the gloss overcoat. That too takes 44 minutes. Like developing film my limitations is drying space. For now I'll be loading Piezography Pro to exploit that one pass printing.

I'm seriously thinking of setting up my 3880 like yours with Jon Cone Color archival pigment inks.

Then again I want/need a 9800 or 9880 to really go big. Some files of the right subject with great lighting and perfect exposure really will hold up to a full 24x36 and you can still nose up into the print. The 9800 or 9880 will be for Enhanced K-7 HD.

BTW I think JC is coming up with the curves for Cone Color to use the gloss HD black. You should look into this. In my printing I'm finding that I use a lot less black ink because the black is so black. Also the added stop of contrast really opens up the prints, and there is an illusion of higher resolution due to the more define contrast from the blacker black.

As always I save where I can. I bulk up and take advantage of twice a year sales at Piezography.

Cal
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Old 01-16-2018   #72
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I'm seriously thinking of setting up my 3880 like yours with Jon Cone Color archival pigment inks.
And I am on the lookout for another 3880 to dedicate to Piezography for BW printing. I have no room for a 7880.
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Old 01-16-2018   #73
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So, can I use the Cone inks (?) in my 3880 and still print decent B&W and Color? I'm not quite clear what the difference is among all the choices.
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Old 01-17-2018   #74
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And I am on the lookout for another 3880 to dedicate to Piezography for BW printing. I have no room for a 7880.
PTP,

Neither do I. LOL.

Funny thing is that I got my 7800 for a meager $100.00. I was at a NYC Meet-Up when I heard my name mentioned. A friend of Chris' was moving back to Japan and only wanted $100.00 for the 7800. Joe offered to help because I no longer own a car (NYC).

So I get a working printer that needed some maintenance, no cloggs. I run the diagnostics and discover that this 9 year old printer only made 1802 prints before I owned it. Pretty much was lightly used. I cleaned the capping station and flushed out the color inks and let the print sit with Piezoflush for half a year. This is good practice and resolulizes accumulated ink in the dampers and print head. Pretty much freshens up a printer.

The refillable carts are about 350 ml and are oversized so you can no longer close the cart doors. In practice I have to top the "GO" every two weeks and the other carts once a month. The 7800 is a thirsty printer especially if you print big. LOL.

Cal
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Old 01-17-2018   #75
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So, can I use the Cone inks (?) in my 3880 and still print decent B&W and Color? I'm not quite clear what the difference is among all the choices.
Maggie,

Piezography is Jon Cone's B&W only systems. If you only print B&W this is the way to go. The darkest blacks. With K-7 you are printing with 7 shades of black and the inks are carbon base so they are not prone to fading. The resolution and fidelity I would say is realized in big prints, and with Piezography I bet any file would or could be printed bigger. I print 20x30 and still can nose-up into a print.

Jon Cone Color are encapsulated inks just like Epson OEM, but are about 1/10th the price per ml. Of course you have to buy refillable carts. The compatibility is so transparent that you could even use the Epson profiles with the Jon Cone inks, but of course the best results would be to use the canned profiles available that are optimized for Jon Cone's inks that are available from their free library.

What I have to do further research on is using the new blacker black developed for Piezography Pro (the B&W inkset) with the color inkset. Not sure these profiles are free. I can tell you that the black is blacker than anything else I have seen except perhaps some blacks made by alternative process. This new High Density Black is a great thing.

For B&W and color printing the Jon Cone archival pigment inks is the way to go because of the cost savings. Also know that the 3880 is a printer that has great durability, and long print head life.

Cal
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Old 01-17-2018   #76
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Jon Cone Color are encapsulated inks just like Epson OEM, but are about 1/10th the price per ml. Of course you have to buy refillable carts. The compatibility is so transparent that you could even use the Epson profiles with the Jon Cone inks, but of course the best results would be to use the canned profiles available that are optimized for Jon Cone's inks that are available from their free library.
You buy the refillable cartridge kit once. It is cheaper than new cartridges from Epson. Then you just refill your cartridges as needed. It is a slick system and saves a ton of money. I have found the inks interchangeable with Epson's except in one respect. When printing digital negatives for alternative processes, the Cone inks appear to block more UV light. I had to adjust my curves significantly. Of course, that doesn't affect normal BW and color prints.
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Old 01-17-2018   #77
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You buy the refillable cartridge kit once. It is cheaper than new cartridges from Epson. Then you just refill your cartridges as needed. It is a slick system and saves a ton of money. I have found the inks interchangeable with Epson's except in one respect. When printing digital negatives for alternative processes, the Cone inks appear to block more UV light. I had to adjust my curves significantly. Of course, that doesn't affect normal BW and color prints.
PTP,

You are further along than me. I too want to eventually make digital negatives, but in my case it will be for contact printing silver wet prints.

The technology now is fully developed and seamless. A guy like me can now do a Salgado without the support of the best Lab in Paris. Contact printing silver wet prints seems like the ultimate expression. Well suited to allow exploiting digital to create the perfect negative to contact print limited editions that are perfect.

Now Jon Cone has a system called "Piezography Pro Edition" that fully calibrates your system. $150 software and an I1 Pro is my next upgrade and I'm there. The only problem is I will need studio space that is big enough for a vacuum frame and drying large prints.

BTW Walter Blackwell has joined Piezography. He is also a master printer. Really great having the support. Walter has streamline the information overload and has helped organize the mess that Jon Cone had created with too much information. Much improved.

Everyone should know that Piezoflush is really great stuff. Will unclog print heads and refresh used printers. Also some of the later printers with mucho channels can be remapped. If you know of anyone throwing away an Epson printer it is basically a free useful printer.

If I had the space I would stockpile 3880's, 7800, 7880's, 9800's, and 9880's. These were the most durable printers Epson ever made, their print heads have long lives, and they made many of them.

Cal
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Old 01-22-2018   #78
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Thanks for the info, Cal. I'llhave to try it after I'veused up my Epson inks!

Oh, and I found a photo of the metal print I mentioned upthread.
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Old 01-22-2018   #79
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Thanks for the photo, Maggie. Looks great.

I just received my metal B&W print, and I must say that I was pleasantly surprised with the quality. Really nice. The image I had printed had a good range of tones and the print held the details really well- deep, dark blacks and very clean whites and an impressive range of gray scale in the image.
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Old 01-22-2018   #80
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RB,
For readers as I remember Hahnemuele offered covers and pages separately. Am I remembering correctly?
Yes, that's the one. I'll try and paste a link below.
https://www.hahnemuehle.com/en/digit...ow/34/313.html

I'm curious for your opinion, as these are about as good as it gets in terms of quality as I see it. I understand you're making your own concept book/album and it's bigger than these? But if you'd settle for an A3 size these might do the trick?

I printed a full A4 album using Eboni-6 carbon inks and was happy with the results. I've got a few unused ones in a storage box. Once I get a printer again, I'll start using these as my main output. Solves presentation as well as storage and with double sided it becomes a slightly cheaper option all things considered....
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