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Frank Jackson on Street Photography I am happy and excited to announce a new RFF forum on Street Photography mentored by Frank Jackson, one of the best producers of analog B/W prints I have ever seen. His shows include the Open Shutter Gallery, Heriard-Cimino Gallery, and Ogden Museum of Southern Art. His images are in the collections of Smithsonian Ogden Museum of Southern Art, California Afro American Museum and Xavier University New Orleans LA. He has worked for or has been featured with Visa Card, Xerox, UCLA, Eric Owen Moss, Architect, Hasselblad Forum (cover),Gordon Parks, Muhammed Ali, Million Man March Wash. DC, Lionel Hampton, jazz legion photographer , 1995-2002, Stevie Wonder, B+W Magazine (British version) twice, Rangefinder Magazine, Dahon Bicycles, Arelli Wheels, Real Product Design, Automobile Club of Southern California. Frank's online images are at fotographz.500px.com and fotographzfrankjackson.tumblr.com . "While on this diverse photographic journey…I have to say during this whole time my love for fine art black and white photography kept growing. I always found time to shoot in different cities and my own personal work…this has sustained me through some very tough times. As of 2012, with the help of a very good friend I maintain a state-of-the-art dream darkroom. The darkroom helps greatly in the on-going practice of understanding “the light”, being able to process film and print drives me to keep my digital photography “organic”. I’m curious visually and shooting what’s, what on the street feeds this curiosity. Everyday I walk out my front door to “see” the world with a digital camera, a film camera, the “cup” and an open mind (mostly).

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Old 11-19-2015   #81
Peter Wijninga
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When shooting out in the street, I have noticed an increase in tension from 3 places.
1. Feel like Police in general are on edge when shooting.
2. Feel like random subjects are less accommodating and sometimes just not accommodating at all.
3. Feel like business owners are more restrictive about photographers.
One more reason to travel outside North America with a camera.
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Old 11-19-2015   #82
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Times are always changing but I don't really believe that people are on the street less. Certain places have become gentrified and are more sterile than they used to be but there's still something worth shooting in arid environments. On the contrary, if you leave these areas and go to other places you'll find just as much mayhem and mystery as before.

Here's a photo I shot in Tokyo. When do you think it was taken?



Answer: About a month ago.

In terms of people getting angry, I've only been yelled at once in the past 5 years and have never been struck at. I've photographed on the street in Detroit, New York, Bangkok, and Tokyo. These days I've become less silent and willingly aim a wide lens point blank at a stranger if they have an interesting look to them.
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Old 11-19-2015   #83
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Here's a photo I shot in Tokyo. When do you think it was taken?

Answer: About a month ago.
I'm not sure this let's us know much... who was supposed to get angry and was this supposed to show us that people are still on the street?
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Old 11-19-2015   #84
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I'm not sure this lets us know much... who was supposed to get angry and was this supposed to show us that people are still on the street?
I'm equally puzzled.

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Old 11-19-2015   #85
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Originally Posted by Peter Wijninga View Post
One more reason to travel outside North America with a camera.
Dear Peter,

Though perhaps not to the UK.

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Old 11-19-2015   #86
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Haha, ok I'm sorry if I wasn't clear. I should have mentioned who I was specifically addressing. The image with the boy on the street with the caption "This photograph will never be taken again"

I was trying to make an argument that things like that still happen all the time.
As far as my posted image, the fact that there are places left in this world that still have a timeless look to them and that there are still places left where people don't heave their heads buried in a mobile phone screen. That perhaps he only feels that way because he has limited himself to a certain place. I should have posted a different photo to make that clearer.
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Old 11-19-2015   #87
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Different world indeed, digital, internet, iPhones, Flickr, Facebook, photo enthusiast forum galleries, likes, thumbs up, child endangerment, identity theft, intellectual property, defamation of character, branding, TSA, DHS, ISIS, etc.

Can't honestly blame people for not wanting to become "Cecil the Lion" for someone's photo-ego, Facebook or Flickr feed. I love photographing people, it is my job to do that. So I make sure I always have a reason for doing it that goes well beyond my self interest like a book project or long term project with basis. I always have references and offer to make a print, get their approval of anything intended to be published, contact info for the publisher.

I have no problems with doing photos of people in public, largely because I have the backing of institutions like the one in the attachment.

For everyone else, those who do it for *fun*...for them selves...man, I don't know what to tell you, the world has changed, people / businesses are going to be increasingly resistant....can you blame them???

I sure can't.....the interest rate for "Freedom" will turn out to be much, MUCH higher than anyone would have thought...

There is no going back.
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Old 11-19-2015   #88
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Different world indeed, digital, internet, iPhones, Flickr, Facebook, photo enthusiast forum galleries, likes, thumbs up, child endangerment, identity theft, intellectual property, branding, TSA, DHS, ISIS, etc.

Can't honestly blame people for not wanting to become a human target for someone's photo-ego, Facebook or Flickr feed. I love photographing people, it is my job to do that. So I make sure I always have a reason for doing it that goes well beyond my self interest like a book project or long term project with basis. I always have references and offer to make a print, get their approval of anything intended to be published, contact info for the publisher.

I have no problems with doing photos of people in public, largely because I have the backing of institutions like the one in the attachment.

For everyone else, those who do it for *fun*...for them selves...man, I don't know what to tell you, the world has changed, people / businesses are going to be increasingly resistant....can you blame them???

I sure can't.....the interest rate for "Freedom" will turn out to be much, MUCH higher than anyone would have thought...
Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear.

Highlight 1: Who gives a toss about regional media?

Highlight 2: Yes -- and I can blame your self-important "I work for an American newspaper" world-picture even more.

Cheers,

R.
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Old 11-19-2015   #89
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Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear.

Highlight 1: Who gives a toss about regional media?

Highlight 2: Yes -- and I can blame your self-important "I work for an American newspaper" world-picture even more.

Cheers,

R.
i basically agree about the "I am here for NYT" snobbish attitude, but I must admit I'm the same way at a wedding when guests are crowding me with their cameras. "I'm the pro, let me work". That's my instinct, but unlike KM-25, I do not pretend to rationalize it.

It's all human nature. We are not rational, not even close. I think it's a wonder we can still photograph freely, because put to a vote, the right would probably go down. But what's really instructive, is the many testimonials here from shooters who really have no problem, move freely and shoot however they want. I think much of the sadness is that everything is a PITA when you get older. LOL

Everytime I get out of bed, I think: this did not used to be so hard!
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Old 11-19-2015   #90
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Different world indeed, digital, internet, iPhones, Flickr, Facebook, photo enthusiast forum galleries, likes, thumbs up, child endangerment, identity theft, intellectual property, defamation of character, branding, TSA, DHS, ISIS, etc.

Can't honestly blame people for not wanting to become "Cecil the Lion" for someone's photo-ego, Facebook or Flickr feed. I love photographing people, it is my job to do that. So I make sure I always have a reason for doing it that goes well beyond my self interest like a book project or long term project with basis. I always have references and offer to make a print, get their approval of anything intended to be published, contact info for the publisher.

I have no problems with doing photos of people in public, largely because I have the backing of institutions like the one in the attachment.

For everyone else, those who do it for *fun*...for them selves...man, I don't know what to tell you, the world has changed, people / businesses are going to be increasingly resistant....can you blame them???

I sure can't.....the interest rate for "Freedom" will turn out to be much, MUCH higher than anyone would have thought...

There is no going back.
There are far more important things in this world than being a proffesional photographer.... you do know that don't you?
Reading your posts over the years, you seem to believe you somehow live in some rarified air since you are a "Pro".
How can you of all people use the term "photo ego" ?
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Old 11-19-2015   #91
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Here's a photo I shot in Tokyo. When do you think it was taken?



Answer: About a month ago.
This a strong photo. The street lines and the lights are exquisite.
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Old 11-19-2015   #92
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I get it, but it is easier to just move on to another photo... you won't change the world one interaction at a time. I'm just one nobody that doesn't have the power the media has. Luckily I live in NYC where there is so much to photograph, so I just don't stress it if someone is being ridiculous. That said, I never say I'm doing something wrong. I just understand if someone doesn't want their photo taken as well.
But that's the thing... we DO change the world one interaction at a time!! If we, as individuals, let the paranoids facing us have their way, the problem just spreads. We EACH have a responsibility as citizens to stand up for the rights our country is founded on. We cannot wait for someone else to do it.
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Old 11-19-2015   #93
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But that's the thing... we DO change the world one interaction at a time!! If we, as individuals, let the paranoids facing us have their way, the problem just spreads. We EACH have a responsibility as citizens to stand up for the rights our country is founded on. We cannot wait for someone else to do it.
Jamie do you really think you are going to change their minds in a confrontation?

Have you ever, I mean EVER, seen anyone change their mind in a political disscussion?

I've been in countless and never seen it happen.

It's my right to tell everyone on the street what I think about USA foreign policy. Is it also my duty to do so?
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**important Notice**
Old 11-19-2015   #94
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Exclamation **important Notice**

Unless you are a pro representing a major entity please do not bring your camera on the street, or to a major event for that mater. Use in your home is permitted (unless an accredited pro is present).

Quote:
I have no problems with doing photos of people in public, largely because I have the backing of institutions like the one in the attachment.

For everyone else, those who do it for *fun*...for them selves...man, I don't know what to tell you, the world has changed, people / businesses are going to be increasingly resistant....can you blame them???

I sure can't.....the interest rate for "Freedom" will turn out to be much, MUCH higher than anyone would have thought...
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Old 11-19-2015   #95
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I don't appreciate the implication. If you'd read and understood my thread I have had many occasions that I've moved on and said "screw it" and continued to photograph in the streets. I was bashed around the head in Cairo for taking a picture in a train station - that was 28 years ago. I've had a bayonet attached to an automatic weapon stuck in my nostril for photographing in Istanbul. This is not a chest-beating testerone-fuelled pissing contest for me.

But good luck to you.
No, it's not a chest beating thing at all, if that's what "made" a photographer all the guys that have died shooting would be the "best". It sounds like you have that same drive and passion for making photos that I do- I guess I'm curious as to why would you choose not to take a bollocking while out and about these days in order to get a photo if you endured all that? That's what doesn't make sense to me. Are you just over it?
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A strange story
Old 11-19-2015   #96
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A strange story

A Strange Story.

I'm a train conductor. The guy with the striped hat, who whistles when the train has to leave, closes the doors and punches tickets. Always have my camera with me, over my left shoulder, under my coat. The job comes first, of course, but often, I get a chance to take a picture. Doesn't take more than a second or so.

Yesterday, I tried to photograph three train drivers marching in goose-step, and missed the shot. One of them followed me, wanted to know the eternal 'Why?'. I tried to reassure him that he wasn't in the picture, that it was a failure, and I wouldn't show it, on my word of honour.

Today, they kept me back from work for half the day, I had to explain my taking of pictures to my 'immediate superior'. The guy had complained, and somebody who doesn't like me had compiled a 'dossier' about my photographic and professional missteps.

The guy making the complaint must be very scared having his picture taken, if he cannot accept my reassurances to the point of filing a complaint.
Then there is the person writing the dossier, who cited an event that happened a year ago : I tried to take her picture, she refused, I didn't take it.
Now she's using this to accuse me of malfeasance.

Some people have very strong feelings, not about pictures, but about the taking of them.

I just hope they won't forbid me to have my camera with me. A silly interdiction, Everybody in the firm has to have a phone, all of them have built in cameras.

Sorry for the rant.

Cheers!
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Old 11-19-2015   #97
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Originally Posted by johnny scarecrow View Post
Did you read my post? No matter.

I'm 59, I have a wonderful family and life. The last few times I've been out street shooting I've been accused - either implicitly or explicitly - of being a "paedophile". The equation here seems to be: older guy with camera = paedophile. No matter that I'm pleasant, I engage, I do not hide what I'm doing or sneak around and I do NOT photograph children, scantily clad babes or various other things which are on my "leave it out" list. It is the observed increasing frequency of this response that leads me to my present position.

You, presumably, are young. You therefore can't perhaps understand what it means to be constantly labelled, in the course of doing something harmless and that you love - and have done without being hassled for many years - something disgusting which is the complete opposite of who you are and how you have lived your life. I have friends who have never had this happen to them, but they are either younger, female or both. I'm sure there are other men my age in my city who likewise never have a problem, but then again I highly doubt that it's anything about me in particular.

So as a result I not only don't enjoy it any more, it is something I have come to dislike. That's just me. When I was younger, yeah, sure, what's a smack on the head or a confrontation with overzealous soldiers other than a good story? Get abused or called a name? Who cares - sticks and stones, right? But at my time of life, being regularly accused of being a monster? Because I take pictures in the street? No thanks.
Ah. Ok. I didn't catch the part where you don't enjoy it anymore! My apologies, both for being thick and for your loss. That's a testament to the political climate we live in. Fear mongers everywhere.
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Old 11-19-2015   #98
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Ah, les Anglo-Saxons...

Doesn't happen much outside the USA and the 51st state -- England.

Very occasionally a problem in Paris. But not, as a rule, in the civilized parts of Europe.

Cheers,

R.
I'm not sure what you are referring to but I find that France is one of the most difficult places in the world for street photography. It's the only place where I've ever been attacked while photographing. I find that in public Americans are a lot friendlier and open-minded.
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Old 11-19-2015   #99
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I'm not sure what you are referring to but I find that France is one of the most difficult places in the world for street photography. It's the only place where I've ever been attacked while photographing. I find that in public Americans are a lot friendlier and open-minded.
Have you ever heard of the 'Paris Syndrome'? - Paris must be the place where image, at least of some, and reality diverge more than of any other place. Paris Syndrome is an actual, technical medical term describing an emotional breakdown following disillusion, inflicted are mostly Japanese, sometimes Chinese: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris_syndrome
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6197921.stm
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Old 11-19-2015   #100
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There are far more important things in this world than being a proffesional photographer.... you do know that don't you?
Reading your posts over the years, you seem to believe you somehow live in some rarified air since you are a "Pro".
How can you of all people use the term "photo ego" ?
Not surprisingly, you have missed the point. There are also far more important things in life than satisfying a desire to as a hobby, obtain photographs of people that one does not know in a manner of approach and thinking that is clearly becoming outdated. I wrote what I did because without those procedures, there is no way in hell I would engage in "Street" photography, my gut tells me it is just not right anymore, especially children.

The world, the whole of it has changed. And because of the onslaught of a "Social Moore's Law" of sorts, it will change even faster.
My opinion, based on the how's and whys of why or how I engage with people I don't know with my camera is wholly unique to me, what I have seen arrive and what I think is coming....and going.

Until laws are more rigorously enforced, if at all, I feel that it is the reasoning of the individual with the camera who will make or break his or her ability to successfully obtain the desired photograph on the streets, not just a press pass or letter of assignment. But in my experience, combined with a deep sense of always putting my subjects or potential subjects first, those credentials sure do help and I feel they will help even more into the future as more people refuse to allow the image maker to have a say in the recording and possible publication of their likeness. In this day and age, people have a right to know why and how a photo of them is to be used, you are engaging in a fool's errand to think otherwise.

Let's always remember that when regarded in it's most evocative result, street photography often contains the likeness of people. Put the people in your photographs first, because it is not about you anymore, it is about them and *clearly* the world is showing us that more and more each day.

To more and more people, telling them you want to or did take their photograph for "fun" is not a good enough reason for doing so, hence the backlash. It's not snobbery on my part, it is what I witness, what I hear from the people **I** photograph. I'm in the minority here and I always will be and that is fine by me, go ahead and beat the crap out of me, hate me, piss on my grave, what ever makes you feel good.

But crapping all over me and my insight does not and will not change the increase in challenges or reaction those with a camera will experience if they can not give a damn good reason for photographing people they do not know. You can count on it getting harder to do because clearly, that is where it is headed.
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Old 11-19-2015   #101
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Have you ever heard of the 'Paris Syndrome'? - Paris must be the place where image, at least of some, and reality diverge more than of any other place. Paris Syndrome is an actual, technical medical term describing an emotional breakdown following disillusion, inflicted are mostly Japanese, sometimes Chinese: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris_syndrome
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6197921.stm
Fascinating !
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Old 11-19-2015   #102
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I've been asked which newspaper I work for and whether the pictures will end up online, very often I smile, I say I don't have a facebook and I shoot film which requires dev and scanning. I don't know if they really believe it but for now it works.

If someone reacts angrily or aggressively from the start I just ignore them, no point arguing, otherwise I try to look friendly, confident and calm. If you start believing you're doing something reprehensible people can smell it off you
I use this approach as well. I also don't have facebook and shoot film, and shooting film requires effort, depending on the person I shot I usually compliment them on their good looks/interesting expression, or I convince them I'd not waste my film on them - but putting it nicely of course.

I had a father yelled at me when I took a photo WITH a young girl, with her mom's approval. She looked at my Rollei and I asked if she wants to hold it. Then I ask if I can take a photo with her holding the camera. Dad was about 30 meter away and I didn't see him, she was only with her mom. I explain that I mean well, I just tried to be friendly and I asked her mom's permission first. He's so upset that none of my word seem to be heard. Luckily the mother explained everything but at that point I was parting ways with him.
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Old 11-19-2015   #103
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A Strange Story.

I'm a train conductor. The guy with the striped hat, who whistles when the train has to leave, closes the doors and punches tickets. Always have my camera with me, over my left shoulder, under my coat. The job comes first, of course, but often, I get a chance to take a picture. Doesn't take more than a second or so.

Yesterday, I tried to photograph three train drivers marching in goose-step, and missed the shot. One of them followed me, wanted to know the eternal 'Why?'. I tried to reassure him that he wasn't in the picture, that it was a failure, and I wouldn't show it, on my word of honour.

Today, they kept me back from work for half the day, I had to explain my taking of pictures to my 'immediate superior'. The guy had complained, and somebody who doesn't like me had compiled a 'dossier' about my photographic and professional missteps.

The guy making the complaint must be very scared having his picture taken, if he cannot accept my reassurances to the point of filing a complaint.
Then there is the person writing the dossier, who cited an event that happened a year ago : I tried to take her picture, she refused, I didn't take it.
Now she's using this to accuse me of malfeasance.

Some people have very strong feelings, not about pictures, but about the taking of them.

I just hope they won't forbid me to have my camera with me. A silly interdiction, Everybody in the firm has to have a phone, all of them have built in cameras.

Sorry for the rant.

Cheers!
I hope this ends well for you..
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Old 11-20-2015   #104
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I'm not sure what you are referring to but I find that France is one of the most difficult places in the world for street photography. It's the only place where I've ever been attacked while photographing. I find that in public Americans are a lot friendlier and open-minded.
Where?

I've lived in France for the last 13 years, and had visited often before that (or I'd not have moved here) and I have had just one confrontation in all that time, in Arles a few years ago.

Cheers,

R.
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Old 11-20-2015   #105
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... I have had just one confrontation in all that time, in Arles a few years ago.

Cheers,

R.
In Arles? The european Capital of Photography? Wow, this is something Roger
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Old 11-20-2015   #106
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The making of this image got me into trouble yesterday. I had a borrowed 20mm Nikkor lens, and saw an opportunity to show what was in a shop window display and the street outside. I took a shot, and a lady from in the shop came out and said I don't think you should be taking photos of that. I said Australian law says I'm in a public place and can photograph what happens there. If you don't want these things seen or photographed you'd better cover them. She turned and left me alone. But I don't feel like it was a good interaction I'd normally like to have with people.
1024) {this.width=1024;this.alt='Click here to see a large version';}" onmouseover="if(this.alt) this.style.cursor='pointer';" onclick="if(this.alt) window.open('http://members.iinet.net.au/~fingon/gallery/f70/20mm/1_reflections_800px.jpg');" border="0">

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Old 11-20-2015   #107
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My support goes out to Lukitas in his photos-at-work problem. It must feel terrible to have this going on. I can only suggest that you make sure that you know the law that applies in your situation and say that you want to see what law you have broken, or written workplace rule, if that is more applicable. Ask for support from your union or other worker representative. Solidarity!
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Old 11-20-2015   #108
jsrockit
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To more and more people, telling them you want to or did take their photograph for "fun" is not a good enough reason for doing so, hence the backlash. It's not snobbery on my part, it is what I witness, what I hear from the people **I** photograph. I'm in the minority here and I always will be and that is fine by me, go ahead and beat the crap out of me, hate me, piss on my grave, what ever makes you feel good.
Ok, since you used "fun" I'm going to assume that you are referring to me and my post. Honestly, I have no problem with your opinion, because it is only that... your opinion. It means nothing to me because I don't know you, I don't know your photography, and all of us, whether pro or not, make choices as to what we photograph (and what we have to take responsibility for).

I think it is a sad world where people assume the worst if you photograph strangers (even other people who photograph). Some of the best (my opinion) photographs ever made were made in this manner. Sure, it might be outdated to some, but I think documenting all times is important. Why should only one period of time be considered worth documenting? Why should only people with "credentials" only be allowed to do it? Does documentation always have to be cutting edge or an important event? Times change and so does everything with it. If we truly think that public photography is coming to an end, that makes it even more important to do it now.

It appears to me that you have a problem with people who don't photograph for a living or in the manner you deem correct. You **** all over the hobbyist on this site all of the time. That's sad.

I do agree that people can say no to being photographed and one should comply, but to assume everyone in public has a problem with being photographed is just silly. I have random people ask me to take their photo at times. Clearly not everyone is opposed to it. I do agree that children are off limits for the most part...but that is my opinion and my feeling. I also struggle with what is right and wrong to do while out on the street. However, I photograph with women and they seem to get away with photographing children in a manner that men can't.
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Old 11-20-2015   #109
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I also desire to exprime my solidarity to Lukitas, whishing him everything will go well
robert
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Old 11-20-2015   #110
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Originally Posted by KM-25 View Post
there is no way in hell I would engage in "Street" photography, my gut tells me it is just not right anymore, especially children.

The world, the whole of it has changed. And because of the onslaught of a "Social Moore's Law" of sorts, it will change even faster.
I'll bet nobody in the world has ever gotten older and said those words, concerning art, music, film, craftsmanship, morals, ethics, lifestyle, etc...

So by your standards, the following shots are somehow unethcial?




Untitled by gaijin_punch, on Flickr


Vending Machine by gaijin_punch, on Flickr


Holding On by gaijin_punch, on Flickr
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Old 11-20-2015   #111
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Lukitas, that is horrible. I'm really sorry to hear it.
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Old 11-20-2015   #112
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Some people have very strong feelings, not about pictures, but about the taking of them.
And also might have strong feeling about what you look like (not you specifically). I think people react not only to the camera, but to your appearance when you photograph in public. If you are not aesthetically pleasing to them, then you are a creep.
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Old 11-20-2015   #113
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A Strange Story.

I'm a train conductor. The guy with the striped hat, who whistles when the train has to leave, closes the doors and punches tickets. Always have my camera with me, over my left shoulder, under my coat. The job comes first, of course, but often, I get a chance to take a picture. Doesn't take more than a second or so.

Yesterday, I tried to photograph three train drivers marching in goose-step, and missed the shot. One of them followed me, wanted to know the eternal 'Why?'. I tried to reassure him that he wasn't in the picture, that it was a failure, and I wouldn't show it, on my word of honour.

Today, they kept me back from work for half the day, I had to explain my taking of pictures to my 'immediate superior'. The guy had complained, and somebody who doesn't like me had compiled a 'dossier' about my photographic and professional missteps.

The guy making the complaint must be very scared having his picture taken, if he cannot accept my reassurances to the point of filing a complaint.
Then there is the person writing the dossier, who cited an event that happened a year ago : I tried to take her picture, she refused, I didn't take it.
Now she's using this to accuse me of malfeasance.

Some people have very strong feelings, not about pictures, but about the taking of them.

I just hope they won't forbid me to have my camera with me. A silly interdiction, Everybody in the firm has to have a phone, all of them have built in cameras.

Sorry for the rant.

Cheers!
You must put yourself in the shoes of your subjects.

One day I was pointing the camera at a postcard stand and a couple passing by thought that was strange, and it was strange, nobody takes photos of postcard stands, postcards are photos.

Of course they had never heard of Daido Moriyama and how he would take photos of photos in a newspaper and publish them in his books without saying anything that these are copies of copies.

Sometimes leave the camera and take photos by just looking.
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Old 11-20-2015   #114
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KM-25

You're promoting the problem in the worst way.
At it's core you are saying the right to take these images may only be owned.
Your so called "credentials" are from your employer... Not the public.
Those papers are not some sort of immunity rather a simple "license" to do business.
I can see why this thread and subject is a threat to you.
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Old 11-20-2015   #115
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KM-25

You're promoting the problem in the worst way.
At it's core you are saying the right to take these images may only be owned.
Your so called "credentials" are from your employer... Not the public.
Those papers are not some sort of immunity rather a simple "license" to do business.
I can see why this thread and subject is a threat to you.
like


a lot
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Old 11-20-2015   #116
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Where?

I've lived in France for the last 13 years, and had visited often before that (or I'd not have moved here) and I have had just one confrontation in all that time, in Arles a few years ago.

Cheers,

R.
Paris, multiple incidents, usually involving me taking a shot and being subsequently harassed by people that may or may not have been in the frame. In one case, someone kicked my camera, in another a group of 6-8 kids forced me to remove the film after surrounding me . Violent incidents such as these are infrequent but more generally, I’m constantly approached and told that I can’t photograph this or photograph that . For cultural and legal reasons, France is a fairly hostile place for street photographers.
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Old 11-20-2015   #117
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When shooting out in the street, I have noticed an increase in tension from 3 places.
1. Feel like Police in general are on edge when shooting.
2. Feel like random subjects are less accommodating and sometimes just not accommodating at all.
3. Feel like business owners are more restrictive about photographers.

I have been shooting "the street" for 40 years, so of course, I have seen this before. But it now it seems increased. Recent events over the last 15 years, seems to have changed everything. maybe I am wrong.
Yes I do agree things have changed but from a big city (Chicago) perspective I think it has gotten a lot easier in some ways.

First time I started shooting street was in the early 1980s when I started working on a project here in Chicago. I was photographing the old Maxwell Street area. Before that i was really into large format, zone system type work. That project ( The Miracle of Maxwell Street; cheat you fair) wound up being my final project in college.

In those days I was the only one on the street with a camera. I stuck out and was harassed a lot. Got into one situation that i am still surprised I got out of.

Today I can't walk a block and not see 3 or 4 cameras. With that many people shooting on the street many don't even pay any attention to me. I sometimes get a snarl or a hassle but it is a lot less common now that it was then.

I was just in the Fla Keys and had no problems at all on the street.

I do think it is just as challenging today to make interesting images on the street as it was then. In that regard I find it to be the same but many things are different. I find the challenge today as it was then is to somehow capture what is relevant today in an interesting way. To me and the way I work and see it's about showing the over saturation of advertising, modern technology and trying to include those elements in my work and do it in an way that makes it of these times.

I think because of all the people and cameras on the street in a city like Chicago or New York, one sticks out a lot less than someone with a camera did in the past and thus if you have camera you don't stand out like you once did and you don't get the attention you might have gotten in the past when a camera on the street was not so common.

Thats my 2 cents...Take it for what its worth.
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Old 11-20-2015   #118
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I think because of all the people and cameras on the street in a city like Chicago or New York, one sticks out a lot less than someone with a camera did in the past and thus if you have camera you don't stand out like you once did and you don't get the attention you might have gotten in the past when a camera on the street was not so common.

Thats my 2 cents...Take it for what its worth.
I agree. I'm shocked at how little I do get harassed in NYC.
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Old 11-20-2015   #119
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Paris, multiple incidents, usually involving me taking a shot and being subsequently harassed by people that may or may not have been in the frame. In one case, someone kicked my camera, in another a group of 6-8 kids forced me to remove the film after surrounding me . Violent incidents such as these are infrequent but more generally, I’m constantly approached and told that I can’t photograph this or photograph that . For cultural and legal reasons, France is a fairly hostile place for street photographers.
For cultural and legal reasons, Paris is NOT typical of France. See Post 26: "Very occasionally a problem in Paris. But not, as a rule, in the civilized parts of Europe."

How long have you lived in France? And, how good is your French?

Cheers,

R.
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Old 11-20-2015   #120
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Photographers are considered the lowest of the low..way down there w/lawyers...in the general publics eye..essentially..pervs..
I remember getting dirty looks from a lady awhile ago...I was in a state park in the woods ..taking a photo of a stream there...w/my 7x17 on Ries tripod and Computar 270mm lens..taking the shot right next to my Subaru Forester..adjusting things..as we all do..she didn't have the balls to say anything...as I look like trouble..to most..but she made real sure to..give me a dirty look..
Then a bit later..at the shoreline with same camera..my wife w/me this time..all kinds of young adults wanted to see thru the GG..good vibes all around..
Then there was the time at the beach with the Veriwide.. 1 gal..definitely didn't like that cam at all..but didn't say anything...
Basically..the human mind is one crazy contraption..you never know what you are getting there..
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