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Frank Jackson on Street Photography I am happy and excited to announce a new RFF forum on Street Photography mentored by Frank Jackson, one of the best producers of analog B/W prints I have ever seen. His shows include the Open Shutter Gallery, Heriard-Cimino Gallery, and Ogden Museum of Southern Art. His images are in the collections of Smithsonian Ogden Museum of Southern Art, California Afro American Museum and Xavier University New Orleans LA. He has worked for or has been featured with Visa Card, Xerox, UCLA, Eric Owen Moss, Architect, Hasselblad Forum (cover),Gordon Parks, Muhammed Ali, Million Man March Wash. DC, Lionel Hampton, jazz legion photographer , 1995-2002, Stevie Wonder, B+W Magazine (British version) twice, Rangefinder Magazine, Dahon Bicycles, Arelli Wheels, Real Product Design, Automobile Club of Southern California. Frank's online images are at fotographz.500px.com and fotographzfrankjackson.tumblr.com . "While on this diverse photographic journey…I have to say during this whole time my love for fine art black and white photography kept growing. I always found time to shoot in different cities and my own personal work…this has sustained me through some very tough times. As of 2012, with the help of a very good friend I maintain a state-of-the-art dream darkroom. The darkroom helps greatly in the on-going practice of understanding “the light”, being able to process film and print drives me to keep my digital photography “organic”. I’m curious visually and shooting what’s, what on the street feeds this curiosity. Everyday I walk out my front door to “see” the world with a digital camera, a film camera, the “cup” and an open mind (mostly).

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Street photography technique
Old 04-25-2015   #1
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Street photography technique

So I have been doing more and more street photography lately and establishing a technique of engaging the subjects. Seems to work well and render better results. I wrote a short blurb on my blog http://jorgetorralba.com/2015/04/25/...ortland-style/ and would be interested to hear what your style is.

Engaging I find more productive and yields results such as this



What say you ????
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Old 04-25-2015   #2
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I just don't have what it takes to engage strangers. I also would prefer (cause and effect I suppose) that the subject be unaware of me taking the picture. I'd call this a candid portrait, which is a legitimate street genre from all that I've read. Mostly it is about what comes from within you I suppose. Certainly this fellow is a statement on the human condition (and I'm not real sure what that is supposed to mean).
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Old 04-25-2015   #3
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It's not candid though?
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Old 04-25-2015   #4
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Some find heads shots like in the OP post interesting. I'm in the opposite.
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Old 04-25-2015   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ko.Fe. View Post
Some find heads shots like in the OP post interesting. I'm in the opposite.
different style for everyone. This was just an example of how engaging makes the subject more likely to accept being photographed.
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Old 04-25-2015   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranchu View Post
It's not candid though?
maybe something like this ?



or

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Old 04-25-2015   #7
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Yes, I would call those candid portraits. Or candids, maybe portrait is implied. As I understand it, the first photo and related technique is generally called a street portrait.
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Old 04-26-2015   #8
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Regardless of technique. I find the typical candid / spontaneous / anything that moves approach is really a hit and miss. I dont like anything staged but do like street portraits.
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Old 04-26-2015   #9
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This is an interesting topic that I have been grappling to do better at as well.
I believe its a combination of how the shooter is feeling, and the overall vibe they get from the subject and vice-versa.

In addtion, I feel that the gear used tends to 'open the subject' and make them feel more at eased as well. In the shot below, it was done with a Mamiya RZ67 and a 110mm. This was a hip shot, fired pretty quickly after a brief focus as he initially rejected my request for a portrait. I took this without his knowledge, well at least till the shutter gave me away.





Striking a conversation before the shot is key, but the first point of contact is ever so much more important as that sets the tone for interaction. Sometimes you get off on the right foot, sometimes never at all.

This shot below is another shot that was taken after a 3-8minute conversation that included persuasion to be photographed. Yet, I failed to convince her for a shot. This was again, taken against her knowledge, till the shutter of the RZ gave me away.

Old habits die hard, so they say.

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Old 04-26-2015   #10
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I do get close, but, not that close.. I like about a 6-8' distance..
Like this one... though I was not within my Zone of Focus... close though

2014 Classic Street Photography by Peter Arbib STREET, on Flickr

If I do get real close (I shoot with a 24mm or 35mm fov), they are not looking at me, but, at something else that has their attention

2013 Classic Street Photography by Peter Arbib STREET, on Flickr
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Old 04-26-2015   #11
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Much as I like the candids, I'm firmly on the side of engaging.
Spontaneity is over-rated.
And I love it when somebody just stares back at me. Makes the picture.

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Old 04-26-2015   #12
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good shots and examples.
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Old 04-27-2015   #13
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I don't tend to shoot too many street portraits but subjects can be engaged with or not, confronting or not - for me it just depends on whats happening.


For instance, this old shot had no initial engagement with the subject beyond the fact he was looking at me.



Whereas here we had a brief connection, catching each others eye, sharing a quick piss-take joke and taking a picture.



Always interesting to see how others do their thing though.
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Old 04-27-2015   #14
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My philosophy is:
- Don't exploit your subjects
- Wide angle lens
- Be discreet
- Close
- Quick
- Smile if noticed.


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Old 04-27-2015   #15
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I enjoy a little engagement, sometimes.

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Old 04-27-2015   #16
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Would someone please explain to me how I can include photographs in my messages to this list?

Thanks
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Old 04-27-2015   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBeeching View Post
Would someone please explain to me how I can include photographs in my messages to this list?

Thanks
I use Photobucket to store images that I embed into threads. Just click on the mountain/scenery symbol and put the link in from there. I think you can embed from Flickr too but I'm not a user so am unsure of the process there.
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Old 04-27-2015   #18
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I have tried from my website and from Flickr and neither seem to work properly. The process ought to be more straightforward!
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Old 04-27-2015   #19
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John, in flickr choose the menu with the curved arrow that goes up to the right. Click on BBCode. Choose the size, say 800 or even 1000 pixels wide, copy from the pane all of the coded contents and paste here. That should do it.
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Old 04-27-2015   #20
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Dear All,

Here we go again, perhaps the photo will come through this time!
My philosophy is:
- Don't exploit your subjects
- Wide angle lens
- Be discreet
- Close
- Quick
- Smile if noticed.
Barcelona by jarbi, on Flickr

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Old 04-27-2015   #21
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Some more examples:
Hero by jarbi, on Flickr

Thirsty by jarbi, on Flickr

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Old 04-27-2015   #22
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I do some street portraits where I engage but I am also fascinated by the moment. Trying to find a little clarity in confusion. I tend to try and see in terms of leading lines, repeating shapes and other visual tools and try and see some relationship to the other elements in the frame.

Technically I tend to pre focus and pre set my exposure so all I am doing is responding to the visual as it happens.

A link few of mine that have been seen by most here.
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...d.php?t=147257

There are no absolutes and no one right or wrong way to do any of this. Only whats right for each of us and the way we see and work.
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Old 04-27-2015   #23
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I sometimes engage with others I photograph... the situation will determine that, I have no problem with that...
but, my portrait will still be candid - per se-, I don't ask for pose.

1024) {this.width=1024;this.alt='Click here to see a large version';}" onmouseover="if(this.alt) this.style.cursor='pointer';" onclick="if(this.alt) window.open('https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8660/16178301081_3b0263ed26_c.jpg');" border="0">
2015 Classic Street Photography by Peter Arbib STREET, on Flickr

These chaps where just relaxing, as I walked by, I raised the camera and just took it.
The guy looking at the camera was entertained that I took his photo with his friend. a short hello, and thank you, and I was off again.
1024) {this.width=1024;this.alt='Click here to see a large version';}" onmouseover="if(this.alt) this.style.cursor='pointer';" onclick="if(this.alt) window.open('https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5490/14427359887_2241787d97_c.jpg');" border="0">
2014 Classic Street Photography by Peter Arbib STREET, on Flickr


As I was raising the camera, she stuck this pose... even though I caught her with her eyes closed (you never now), It still works for me.
This is still an un-asked pose.. we did have short conversation after the fact.
1024) {this.width=1024;this.alt='Click here to see a large version';}" onmouseover="if(this.alt) this.style.cursor='pointer';" onclick="if(this.alt) window.open('https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3876/15040143221_cc8ec984e2_c.jpg');" border="0">
2014 Classic Street Photography by Peter Arbib STREET, on Flickr
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Old 04-27-2015   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OurManInTangier View Post
I don't tend to shoot too many street portraits but subjects can be engaged with or not, confronting or not - for me it just depends on whats happening.


For instance, this old shot had no initial engagement with the subject beyond the fact he was looking at me.



Whereas here we had a brief connection, catching each others eye, sharing a quick piss-take joke and taking a picture.



Always interesting to see how others do their thing though.
.... those are just typical of your photos though, we were discussing this the other day and that's simply your style I think. Do you get choose how how to take them? could you do them differently? ... I suspect it's

I get annoyed sometimes when my photos always look like I've taken them ... I just stand still and take photos as the world passes, no one seems to pay me any attention and they always look like I've taken them

PS ... that second shot is a belter, just you
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Old 04-27-2015   #25
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Quote:
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.... those are just typical of your photos though, we were discussing this the other day and that's simply your style I think. Do you get choose how how to take them? could you do them differently? ... I suspect it's

I get annoyed sometimes when my photos always look like I've taken them ... I just stand still and take photos as the world passes, no one seems to pay me any attention and they always look like I've taken them

PS ... that second shot is a belter, just you
Ahhh, 'style' is always a bit of a concern to me. I always wonder how thin a line it may be between having a recognisable style or even, dare I use the word, vision (which is usually held to be a good thing) and dipping over into viewing, and so photographing, the world in the same myopic way as always and never producing anything new. Sometimes looking at your own pictures can be quite dispiriting. For instance, looking at most of my spare time stuff I see the same 'looking through a window' composition in pretty much every shot.

Having said that, I've looked at the photography of others, some here, and made the effort to try to see and react in the way I imagine they must to get the pictures they do and the result is always the same. In modern terms; Epic Fail. So I understand how you feel, we're stuck with ourselves.

Thanks for the compliment on the second shot, strange numbers on a wall, a fez wearing smoker flicking the V's....if only every street corner offered up oddness with such ease
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Old 04-27-2015   #26
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Quote:
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Ahhh, 'style' is always a bit of a concern to me. I always wonder how thin a line it may be between having a recognisable style or even, dare I use the word, vision (which is usually held to be a good thing) and dipping over into viewing, and so photographing, the world in the same myopic way as always and never producing anything new. Sometimes looking at your own pictures can be quite dispiriting. For instance, looking at most of my spare time stuff I see the same 'looking through a window' composition in pretty much every shot.

Having said that, I've looked at the photography of others, some here, and made the effort to try to see and react in the way I imagine they must to get the pictures they do and the result is always the same. In modern terms; Epic Fail. So I understand how you feel, we're stuck with ourselves.

Thanks for the compliment on the second shot, strange numbers on a wall, a fez wearing smoker flicking the V's....if only every street corner offered up oddness with such ease
... that's the bugger of it; the things we admire in the work of others we question in our own.

I've noticed some have that attraction to the surreal, and some to the real almost as if they had a choice that I don't seem to get ... I expect it's in the editing but you and Bob France seem to get more of the surreal stuff to edit from than I can find

... but I'll put this one in as a conversation piece


No 39 par Sparrow ... Stewart Mcbride, on ipernity
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Old 04-27-2015   #27
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work

Interesting views on street work, but in the end, like most things, there doesn't seem to be one way.

100115_windowwasher2_
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Old 04-27-2015   #28
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@Tati
I washed glass for over 12 years, And, though there is not "one" correct way, starting in the middle (as he did), or at the bottom (as I did) are the most efficient ways,
though I chose a blade that was a tad more than 1/2 the width of the glass.. makes for one large upside-down "U" sweep, and done.

BTW, This is a great photo... almost a "statue of liberty" pose with the way the bright light spot is placed!
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Old 04-27-2015   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBeeching View Post
Dear All,

Here we go again, perhaps the photo will come through this time!
My philosophy is:
- Don't exploit your subjects
- Wide angle lens
- Be discreet
- Close
- Quick
- Smile if noticed.
Barcelona by jarbi, on Flickr

John
That's a good working philosophy, and also ^^^ a nice shot.
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Old 04-27-2015   #30
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Quote:
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@Tati
I washed glass for over 12 years, And, though there is not "one" correct way, starting in the middle (as he did), or at the bottom (as I did) are the most efficient ways,
though I chose a blade that was a tad more than 1/2 the width of the glass.. makes for one large upside-down "U" sweep, and done.

BTW, This is a great photo... almost a "statue of liberty" pose with the way the bright light spot is placed!
Thanks for the kind words. And years ago in NYC I had family that had a window cleaning business. Something near and dear.
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Old 09-22-2015   #31
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In my view the means, whether its candid or posed (street portraits) are simply an approach, neither approach guarantee 'quality' photographs.
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Old 10-07-2015   #32
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I'm currently a M4/3's user considering an M Typ 240.
To get the decisive moment, as its termed, attempting to focus on the fly using a RF is going to be too slow - that's my perception, but with experience there would be an improved response. As a consequence, zone focusing seems to be the logical solution, in which case it's just a matter of seeing the shot and pressing the release. But zone focusing comes with a limitation in thit everything within the zone is acceptably focused, subject separation, if that's your wish needs a wider aperture and more precise focusing by which time your subject has moved or changed his or her expression, body language etc. I can't see a solution to limited depth of field and capturing the decisive moment. It's something that bothers me, holding me back from pulling the plug on an M240.
My current technique varies, but I certainly don't make eye contact with my subject, I click and move on. Sometimes I frame the shot with the camera pointing at an individual, then wait until they look at the camera lens, then snap. Again I do not make eye contact or talk, it adds nothing to the shot.
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Old 10-07-2015   #33
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Obviously, some cameras are easier to use than others, but it is probably more important to be so thoroughly familiar with your equipment that you need not think about the technical side. Using the machine must become intuitive, then you can pay attention to what is going on around you. A mechanical camera is in many ways ideal as there are fewer controls to worry about. The photos I showed above were all taken on a film Leica with either a 28 or 35 mm lens zone focused. However, you can equally use a digicam. These two were taken with a X-Pro1, the first with a zone-focused 18 mm and the second with a focused 35 mm wide open.
[IMG]Hands by John Beeching, on Flickr[/IMG]
[IMG]London by John Beeching, on Flickr[/IMG]
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