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Is technology your friend or foe?
Old 07-05-2019   #1
kshapero
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Angry Is technology your friend or foe?

I use email, the Web, texting and What's App. No longer can sleep at night. Mind is always working. iPhones, Ipad and laptop. Constant distractions and by touch screen on my car. It would probably kill me to start up with all these other anti sanity social media sites.Am I a Luddite? Confess up. Is this stuff killing us?
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Old 07-05-2019   #2
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For me it's not technology it's the focus on profitability above all else.

My vote is Not a Luddite. I think you are more wise like a Rabbi, eye of an eagle, and heart of a good person.

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Old 07-05-2019   #3
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Originally Posted by BillBingham2 View Post
For me it's not technology it's the focus on profitability above all else.

My vote is Not a Luddite. I think you are more wise like a Rabbi, eye of an eagle, and heart of a good person.

B2 (;->
Well said Grasshopper.
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Old 07-05-2019   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshapero View Post
I use email, the Web, texting and What's App. No longer can sleep at night. Mind is always working. iPhones, Ipad and laptop. Constant distractions and by touch screen on my car. It would probably kill me to start up with all these other anti sanity social media sites.Am I a Luddite? Confess up. Is this stuff killing us?

Greetings from a little ways north of you in Sarasota! I don't think you are a Ludditte but a realist. All of the "anti sanity social media sites" (apt description) are designed to be addictive. They want your attention and data. Their customers are advertisers and, as the saying goes, if you're not the customer, you're the product. I think everyone should keep that in perspective. It's great to connect with friends and family and "find your tribe" but remember whenever your eyes are on social media, you are feeding the advertising/consumerism machine.
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Old 07-05-2019   #5
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Or am I just an old guy trying get back to the "Garden"?
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Old 07-05-2019   #6
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Just take control of the distractions.
  • Turn off the ringers and notifications, put down your cell phone.
  • Set up the "VIP" callers list on the phone so that it only dings you when someone whose messages you know you always need to be aware of contacts you.
  • Cordon off a time during the day when you address your email and other messages, and stick to it.
  • When you're reading a web page or email and there are embedded links in the stream of what you're reading, avoid the impulse to click through to their content every time you encounter one.
  • Don't carry the devices all the time: Go about your life without thinking of them.

A bit of the dis-ease is the adoption of a psychological need to stay on top of this stuff constantly. You never needed to do that before, you don't need to do it now: Most things can wait a while and don't need your instant awareness or attention.

I almost always have my smartphone with me now, I use it quite a lot for many things. But I generally don't answer calls or txts immediately unless I see they are important (from a VIP) and/or need immediate response. I do my email cleanup in the morning and reserve time to give deliberate responses to the two or three messages that need a decent response later.

And then I go on my bicycle ride and either just ride or listen to music or a book with my headphones while I ride, only stuff that I don't find distracting and that helps me keep the pace of my cycling consistent. Same with doing my photography: I concentrate on seeing what's around me and leave the devices inert.

There were other annoying burdens in other times. This is just the current one, and it's just as much a PITA to manage as the others were. On the other hand, the devices and the infrastructure of communications and information available now have many benefits and advantages. Just don't let all that stuff be in control...

G
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Old 07-05-2019   #7
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The anxiety issues are well documented, but since it is an addiction, those addicted exhibit the classic behavior of denial. As they are sure to in this thread.
Technology, in this area, may not be necessarily a foe, but it’s like alcohol and the difference between an occasional single drink, and 4 drinks every day. Might be friendly, might not.
But, for most people, the result is that they spend their lives now being constantly distracted from their distractions, and meaningful things are all crowded out.
Good luck cutting the cord.
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Old 07-05-2019   #8
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IPhones and emails made my job easy. I don't have fax anymore.
My job which I do since early nineties is always involved computers, software and network. And now bosses want us to do scripting, instead of hiring programmers.
It is not technology. It is greed of management.
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Old 07-05-2019   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Just take control of the distractions.
  • Turn off the ringers and notifications, put down your cell phone.
  • Set up the "VIP" callers list on the phone so that it only dings you when someone whose messages you know you always need to be aware of contacts you.
  • Cordon off a time during the day when you address your email and other messages, and stick to it.
  • When you're reading a web page or email and there are embedded links in the stream of what you're reading, avoid the impulse to click through to their content every time you encounter one.
  • Don't carry the devices all the time: Go about your life without thinking of them.

A bit of the dis-ease is the adoption of a psychological need to stay on top of this stuff constantly. You never needed to do that before, you don't need to do it now: Most things can wait a while and don't need your instant awareness or attention.

I almost always have my smartphone with me now, I use it quite a lot for many things. But I generally don't answer calls or txts immediately unless I see they are important (from a VIP) and/or need immediate response. I do my email cleanup in the morning and reserve time to give deliberate responses to the two or three messages that need a decent response later.

And then I go on my bicycle ride and either just ride or listen to music or a book with my headphones while I ride, only stuff that I don't find distracting and that helps me keep the pace of my cycling consistent. Same with doing my photography: I concentrate on seeing what's around me and leave the devices inert.

There were other annoying burdens in other times. This is just the current one, and it's just as much a PITA to manage as the others were. On the other hand, the devices and the infrastructure of communications and information available now have many benefits and advantages. Just don't let all that stuff be in control...

G
GulpI'll try. I'll try.or we could just use explosives.
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Old 07-05-2019   #10
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Quote:
Is technology your friend or foe?
I recommend a book on this topic:
The Way Home; Tales from a life without technology

by Mark Boyle
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Old 07-05-2019   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ko.Fe. View Post
It is not technology. It is greed of management.
Agree 150%

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Old 07-05-2019   #12
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The problem is not the technology but people's behaviors, which are largely within their control. If you think that your actions are killing you, change them. Assume some responsibility instead of blaming the technology.
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Old 07-05-2019   #13
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Tech is just a tool, make of it what you will.
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Old 07-05-2019   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptpdprinter View Post
The problem is not the technology but people's behaviors, which are largely within their control. If you think that your actions are killing you, change them. Assume some responsibility instead of blaming the technology.



Much psychological research and the entire advertising industry may disagree.
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Old 07-05-2019   #15
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Sometimes friend, sometimes foe. But it offers too many good things to ignore or avoid.
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Old 07-05-2019   #16
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Technology is a friend; but we are our own foe if we don't use it wisely, mindfully.
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Old 07-05-2019   #17
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Technology? Love and hate...

I agree 100% what Godfrey suggests ...

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Old 07-05-2019   #18
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I don't think you're a Luddite (which is a good thing anyway), you just have common sense. That's in short supply these days. Must be back ordered or something. All these so called labor saving devices cause us to be constantly married to the stuff, which is hardly labor saving when we spend all of our time on it!

I do not do any social media at all, mainly because it's a lie. It's isolating, not social. Social means in person, or at least having a real connection to another living being, not a machine. I think all this constant electronic time dumbs us down considerably, and ruins our ability to focus and concentrate on what is actually important in our lives. It's inherently addictive, and purposefully designed that way on the front end. Personally, I don't like being manipulated or conned, especially by untrustworthy companies like google, youtube, facebook, etc..
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Old 07-05-2019   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Just take control of the distractions.
  • Turn off the ringers and notifications, put down your cell phone.
  • Set up the "VIP" callers list on the phone so that it only dings you when someone whose messages you know you always need to be aware of contacts you.
  • Cordon off a time during the day when you address your email and other messages, and stick to it.
  • When you're reading a web page or email and there are embedded links in the stream of what you're reading, avoid the impulse to click through to their content every time you encounter one.
  • Don't carry the devices all the time: Go about your life without thinking of them.

...I almost always have my smartphone with me now, I use it quite a lot for many things. But I generally don't answer calls or txts immediately unless I see they are important (from a VIP) and/or need immediate response. I do my email cleanup in the morning and reserve time to give deliberate responses to the two or three messages that need a decent response later.
...
G
Perfectly stated. I am in this very same mode most of the time. I do turn my notifications back on from time to time when in the middle of a project that I should stay on top of, but more often I simply add a few relevant people to my list of VIPs for the duration of the project.

I have one email address that goes to my phone (an address only a very select few have), the rest of my email is solely on my desktop computer, so when I deal with email first thing every morning I am able to know I'm done with that till the next day. 'Urgent' has a very different meaning these days than it did twenty years ago. I prefer the traditional definition.
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Old 07-05-2019   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyjoe View Post
Agree 150%

Best,
-Tim

I never owned, owning personal mobile phone.
My employers were, are providing it.
With my current work, not only I have to respond to calls, but it is advised to check emails and Skype message boards. I'm not paid for it. If I pick up the case , then I paid overtime. But then I have no choice to take off time, only be paid for overtime if I pick up the case after working hours.

Any other public company in same industry I know is using rotating shifts to cover 24/7. But if it is non regular hours shift, company has to pay more.
I only learned it about recently. Before I was wondering, why here in GTA everything has to be 8.30 to 5....

Working in Moscow I would take public transportation and visit two, three customers sites per day. Here it is still possible, but...
Then I came to Canada in 2003, I was getting on customer site regularly.
Now it is all on VPN. Honestly, it sucks. You have to handle more cases under same wage. And you have to seat more in cubical instead of travelling.
I used to go on site earlier and take street pictures...
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Old 07-05-2019   #21
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I never check my office email when not in the office... staff who try to push the problem up the line lean to take responsibility, management understand (and respect) the schedule... and lunch time is for lunch... No smart phone, no internet when moving from A-to-B (or when out with a camera). When working it's 150%. Every problem doesn't need my personal touch and it's down right amazing what gets resolved overnight.

The secret to a good day at the office is arrive refreshed and start a little early.
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Old 07-05-2019   #22
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It depends...

With best regards.

Pfreddee(Stephen)
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Old 07-05-2019   #23
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I'm reminded how technology has made its way into my life every time I get in my vehicle, and put it in reverse. That's when the little screen comes to life with a view of the area behind, and an overlay of what way my vehicle is pointed, and how turning the steering will affect the direction it will go.


Forty-seven years ago I used to drive a nuclear powered fast attack submarine for a living. In front of the handling stations (rudder and sail planes on the right, and stern planes on the left) was a display that showed a representation of where the submarine was in relation to where it was headed, and how close to requested depth it was. It was top secret stuff at the time, but now I have basically the same system in my personal vehicle. Only going in reverse.


Not once when I was sitting there trying to keep the display from showing me off course, or out of the depth zone did I think this should be in a car. It actually repeated what we used to always do by reading the numbers off a series of gauges, which was to me less stressful. But the diving officer, and officer of the deck could see what was going on with just a glance, as the gauges were harder to read from the distance they would normally be from the control stand. So I learned to live with it.


Just like I'm getting used to using the rear view camera in my vehicle. I don't like it, but because of the way the car is designed, it's much like being in that sub again, as it is very hard to see what is happening when going in reverse.


So sometimes technology is helpful, but it is nice to get away from it. I got a cheap, no-contract smart phone just so I could have a weather app, and access my Flickr account on the go. I never made or took calls on it. I eliminated any app that I had no use for, such as all the social media ones, games, Amazon, YouTube, and anything that was basically designed just to let the Great Google know where you were, and what you were doing. I taped over the rear facing camera until I found out it interfered with the touch screen. I shut it off every night, and wouldn't turn it on again until I was ready to leave the abode.



And even though it was very handy for what I did use it for, it was still to me a burden to have it around, as every day someone would call its number which I had never given out, and I had to cancel the call just to get the thing to stop ringing. It was hard to handle with its slick shell, so I put a rubber cover on it, and then it wouldn't go in my phone holster, so I had to find a pocket for it to ride in, which meant rearranging the stuff I carried all the time.


And through all that, I still had my old flip-phone for making and taking calls on. So what was the use? The only things that I wanted to do with it were the very things I can't do with the flip-phone: weather, maps, Flickr, reading e-mails, and the photography apps I was planning on installing. But a system update caused it to only let the non-native apps (ones that I installed) work when the phone had a WiFi connection. It was coming up on its service renewal date, so I just let it die. I miss it every so often, like when I want to know how soon it's going to start raining, or want to show someone the photos I've taken. But it's good riddance if you ask me.


No, Akiva, you are not a Luddite. You're like me, trying to find my way through all this wireless mess to find a clearer picture of how things should be. What to embrace, and what to ignore are the main themes of my life anymore. I don't even watch much TV, as the shows are just rehashed older versions, or multiple copies of the same thing (how many NCIS shows does CBS need?). And the commercialism of stupidity in shows like Big Brother just shows how crass the networks are.


So hang in there my brother, and you'll make it through.


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Old 07-06-2019   #24
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I think the RFF demographic is showing its age and inflexibility. OK, I know not that all older people are like that...!

Ignoring or refusing today's communications technology is simply cutting off your nose to spite you face, like King Canute rebuking the incoming tide.

If you have a problem with technology, you're using it wrongly... Social media, digital communication, smartphones, tailored content, online collaboration, the IoT, smart cities, AI, personal tracking: these things put YOU in control, placing power and information into your hands that our ancestors could only dream of.

Technology is changing faster, becoming more and more integrated in our lives, and less and less able to be ignored. Living "off the grid" or being a "Luddite" will soon no longer be quaint eccentricities but serious disabling impediments to taking part in our society.

Millennials embrace today's technology, and are agile - adopting and discarding technologies continuously. They use technology to enrich their lives, able to instantly access people and information. But they are in the driving seat: they control what personal information is publicly and privately accessible and to whom, they decide if and when to respond to email and social media. In contrast, many Baby Boomers seem to consider being in contact 24/7 an intrusion rather than empowering, that they MUST respond ASAP for some reason... putting off or ignoring email or social media is not like ignoring a letter or phone call!)

Get a (digital) life...!
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Old 07-06-2019   #25
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Hehe, my impression is that most millennials I know (I am one myself) do see the negative sides, while embracing it anyway to some degree. And most of us are not naive enough to believe we're in the driving seat with regard to what information we give away. Sure, those of us who still use Facebook usually are familiar with its privacy settings, but aware that most things we do online or leave traces that are at least as useful as our contents to advertisers as well as actors with (even) more sinister intentions.

In general, of course technology (I'm not sure if it were easier to discuss if we were more specific, social media? Mobile internet access?) is in the first place just stuff that people make and other people use. But it would be a mistake to think it's neutral and one can make of it whatever one wants to. Just like even the simplest tool, with it come new modes of interaction and new and old power relations between tool and human, raw material provider and capitalist and worker and different users. I should be benevolent to the user in some ways but it is made for profit, so be sure that when in doubt, the benefit of those who make it is put before that of the user. So it's not neutral from the beginning. Yes it is something one can use it to one's benefit, but it's a constant struggle to even notice the negative impacts and keep them at bay, and in the end also a political struggle about who can do what with these powerful tools.
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Old 07-06-2019   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshapero View Post
No longer can sleep at night. Mind is always working.

Caffeine will do that to you sometimes.


But when I want to sleep, I create more of a lo-tech space for myself: DSL modem and wifi get shut off, phone goes into Do Not Disturb mode (and gets packed away beyond arm's reach). I don't have too many "smart" type devices in general: Just add candles and cake and I think it'd be very "hygge".
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Old 07-06-2019   #27
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Technology..allowed you to post this thread...lol..
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Old 07-06-2019   #28
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Quote:
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I think the RFF demographic is showing its age and inflexibility. OK, I know not that all older people are like that...!

Ignoring or refusing today's communications technology is simply cutting off your nose to spite you face, like King Canute rebuking the incoming tide.

If you have a problem with technology, you're using it wrongly... Social media, digital communication, smartphones, tailored content, online collaboration, the IoT, smart cities, AI, personal tracking: these things put YOU in control, placing power and information into your hands that our ancestors could only dream of.

Technology is changing faster, becoming more and more integrated in our lives, and less and less able to be ignored. Living "off the grid" or being a "Luddite" will soon no longer be quaint eccentricities but serious disabling impediments to taking part in our society.

Millennials embrace today's technology, and are agile - adopting and discarding technologies continuously. They use technology to enrich their lives, able to instantly access people and information. But they are in the driving seat: they control what personal information is publicly and privately accessible and to whom, they decide if and when to respond to email and social media. In contrast, many Baby Boomers seem to consider being in contact 24/7 an intrusion rather than empowering, that they MUST respond ASAP for some reason... putting off or ignoring email or social media is not like ignoring a letter or phone call!)

Get a (digital) life...!
How many IoT realized projects you know?
I was studying it last summer and didn't find many.

Last year report on millenials shows their control of privacy is done much easier way.
Basicly millenials have ditched the social media. They might work for it, but not participating.

Amazon, Google, Disney new streaming technologies are managed and run by technical stuff which represent this forum participants age.
If you look at the age of those who implements digital technologies in our lives, including standartization, you are not going to find much millennials.
Using is one thing, making it availiblefirst is diffrent.

Agile is next to twenty years old, btw. In IT it is old.
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Old 07-06-2019   #29
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I use technology to help me. Stock buy and sell each order is $4.99 on E-Trade no matter number of shares.

I’m not afraid of it except when I look at my test results from my annual. So far so good. Much easier getting a flu shot today compared when I was getting ready (military) to go overseas, two airguns, one for each arm 18 shots all at once! I didn’t lose my shot card or I’d have to get them all over. Now records on internet server.
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Old 07-06-2019   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshapero View Post
I use email, the Web, texting and What's App. No longer can sleep at night. Mind is always working. iPhones, Ipad and laptop. Constant distractions and by touch screen on my car. It would probably kill me to start up with all these other anti sanity social media sites.Am I a Luddite? Confess up. Is this stuff killing us?
You're not a Luddite since you are using all this by choice. But perhaps too much if it's interfering with your sleep.

Guidelines I follow are:
  • Device screens and sounds turned off when I go to bed. If they have blinking notification lights, I put something on top of them or have them in another room.
  • Make sure devices are set to night-light conditions after sunset so the blue screen exposure before bed doesn't interfere with sleep
  • I don't take my phone with me around the house. I park it and occasionally check it.
  • No phone with me around town. I only take it with me if I go on the highway in case of emergency, or somewhere I need directions.
  • Email gets checked weekday mornings. Including any responses, it usually takes less than ten minutes. Normally not even 2 minutes.
  • I only check about 3 websites daily. No online news. I read the physical paper in the morning coffee shop and that's more than enough.
  • No social networks except Flickr, which is basically the only benign one IMHO. Well, and a couple of forums like this one, because it is civil. No uncivil ones, life is too short.
  • Texting and Whatsapp, I take 5 minutes 3 times a day for that. More than enough.
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Old 07-06-2019   #31
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Millennials are not in control. Facebook, Google et al are in control. Millennials either think they are in control, or don't know or care about the privacy they are giving up.

Unless you take steps otherwise , and few do, everything you do on the internet is tracked and cataloged. You smartfone's GPS pings your location to the tower. Alexa waits for you to summon her listening to every word.

There are some great benefits with all this to me, the consumer. Some of it is a double edge sword.

While I prefer doing photography with 60 year old analog cameras, I have no problem with tech. I own a small tech company and use high level tech every day. But I don't need a "smart" refrigerator seeing I'm low on milk and having Alexa order it





If you have a problem with technology, you're using it wrongly... Social media, digital communication, smartphones, tailored content, online collaboration, the IoT, smart cities, AI, personal tracking: these things put YOU in control, placing power and information into your hands that our ancestors could only dream of.


Millennials embrace today's technology, and are agile - adopting and discarding technologies continuously. They use technology to enrich their lives, able to instantly access people and information. But they are in the driving seat: they control what personal information is publicly and privately accessible and to whom, they decide if and when to respond to email and social media. In contrast, many Baby Boomers seem to consider being in contact 24/7 an intrusion rather than empowering, that they MUST respond ASAP for some reason... putting off or ignoring email or social media is not like ignoring a letter or phone call!)

Get a (digital) life...![/quote]
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Old 07-06-2019   #32
Doug
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I use email, the Web, texting and What's App. No longer can sleep at night. Mind is always working. iPhones, Ipad and laptop. Constant distractions and by touch screen on my car...
All my email and web browsing is done on a desktop, not iPhone which is mainly a *phone* ! So it's not distracting, generally, but useful in the few things for which I use it. Technology today is marvelous and enhances the quality of life if you can work it right.

They say for good sleep not to end the day viewing screens of any sort. Wind down, relax, put aside worries and conflicts. Alcohol nitecap no, warm milk yes.

I used to have an "active sleep" problem where my dreaming would get out of hand physically, with broken bones and scars. I learned to bend my mind to pleasant thoughts as I settle into bed, thinking of a favorite hobby activity, a cycling ride (which way to go, imagine the terrain), or contemplate a favored tree.

I also put my iPhone under the pillow running "SleepTracker" app, which uses the accelerometer to sense movement and sleep quality. Also can track exercise.
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Old 07-06-2019   #33
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In today's internet market I believe it's not great. Too many companies using business models that offer 'free' services while making you their product.
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Good point.
Old 07-06-2019   #34
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Good point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emile de Leon View Post
Technology..allowed you to post this thread...lol..
We wouldn't have the world wide coverage that we enjoy on this forum with out technology.
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Old 07-06-2019   #35
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Technology is great when it works, or is being used for good. It's when people start to think they can't live without it, and have their faces buried in their phones 24/7 that things go wrong. Like getting run over because you walked out into traffic while trying to keep up with your Twitter account. Or running someone over because you were keeping up with your Twitter account. I see one of my neighbors "walking" the dog every day, and he has no idea what is going on around him because he's concentrating on his phone, and his poor dog doesn't get the type of exercise he needs.


Letting technology be the guiding force in your life is just wrong, because when it all goes away, what do you do? Folks have their whole life wrapped up in their phones, so if it gets lost, broken, or stolen they might go into shock. There goes all their photos, banking information, contacts, everything that might be of importance (unless they had it all backed up somewhere).



I have no problem with using technology (been using computers since 1978), but I also know one needs a back-up plan. It's why I still have a land-line phone. When we lost power for eight days, I was one of three tenants in our apartment community that had phone service. Everyone else had cells phones they couldn't get charged, or home phones running off their now dead cable router, like my 90 year old neighbor.


Yeah, all of today's modern conveniences are nice, but one needs to keep it all in perspective, and not sell your soul to the corporations trying to make money on your life.


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Old 07-07-2019   #36
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I’m still trying to figure out how musicians get inside the radio.
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Old 07-07-2019   #37
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Sometimes friend, sometimes foe. But it offers too many good things to ignore or avoid.
It also offers a lot of terrible things that SHOULD be hard to ignore. This depends on where you live though.
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Old 07-07-2019   #38
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I work for myself, so phone-tech lets me be away from my home office doing other things during slow times. My clients expect me to be reasonably available, and I am. But I am not a power user on the phone. So: good news, bad news. The good news is that for the five or six functions I use it for (phone,e-mail, maps, calulator, lists, news aggregator, one or two novels) the phone helps. Bad news is you have to set some limits, or be ruled by the device. So:

I only IM with family.
I don't use the phone for social media.
Phone is off/in another room at night.
No phones at meals.
No social media on phone.
No music, movies, streaming, retail, browsing etc. on the phone.
No photography with the phone.

These "rules" sort of emerged organically from how I use the dingus . . . and work involves sitting at a desk and staring at a screen. I do too much of that already.
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Old 07-07-2019   #39
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I chose a flip-phone and had text and The Web turned off by the provider.
I turn it on when I leave for work and off when I get home.
If it rings long enough my home phone - not in the bedroom - will wake me in an emergency.

All my Web browsing is done at home on a desktop or a laptop when traveling.
I don't stream or download audio or video, however I occasionally watch a video of a musical performance.
I recently purchased an Internet radio with which I plan to listen to radio broadcasts from faraway places.
I make some online purchases but I pay all my monthly recurring bills by letter mail using stamps.
I have been participating in Internet forums since Usenet but have never joined any social media sites.

My car is a 2003 model, all analog with no touch screen.
It does have multiple airbags, ABS and traction control, as well as a CD player.
Some of the "must-have" features in new cars today make me laugh.

I have yet to find a digital camera that I like using.

As others have stated we are all users of technology.
Some of us merely prefer older, time-tested forms.

Chris
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Old 07-07-2019   #40
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My car is a 2014 model (bought used two years ago) and it came with two owner's manuals. The thin one is for the standard automobile features that basically tells you you can't fix any of them so don't try. The thicker one is for the entertainment/navigation system. I figured out how to play music using Bluetooth from my iPhone but I still can't use the GPS very well. After a trip to the car wash sometimes settings have gotten changed on some features because the guys wiping down the interior inadvertently push buttons. My wife hates the car and refuses to drive it most of the time in preference to her beat up 1998 Tahoe. I like the car but I hate having to use the manuals to reset something that I or the carwash guys have accidentally changed.

My iMac, iPhone and iPad get automatic updates from Apple. Sometimes these updates change settings and it's annoying to have to muddle through the settings while doing a Google search to figure out how to get back to where I was before. I like my iPhone and iPad but I wish Apple didn't think they knew more about how I use them than I do. The Mac seems more immune to this problem.

My cameras are all digital and mostly of the same brand. I have them all set up the same way. I've also turned off or don't use most of the features they offer because that's how I like to do my picture-taking. Every time I do a firmware update I keep my fingers crossed something doesn't get screwed up. Thus far all is well. Actually, the cameras are the most simple devices I use. I very much like them.

I read a few websites daily. I am a member of this forum and one other. I do not use Facebook, Instagram, Flickr, Twitter or any other social media website. I do a brief scan of the news on the Internet but I refuse to even try to stay abreast of current events. I could care less about the Kardashians, the politicians or the media darlings and I'm usually appalled at the lack of knowledge and near illiteracy of most newscasters on television. I use weather apps, I buy stuff from Amazon, B&H, iTunes and a few other online retailers. I guess Google knows more about me than it should but it doesn't bother me too much. I get more annoyed at the intrusions of robo-calls, Mormon missionaries and Jehovah's Witnesses than targeted ads on websites.

Sometimes technology is annoying. But, like most things in life, I can muddle through it and come out unscarred.
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