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Voigtlander 90mm f3.5 APO-Lanthar LTM lens
Old 04-13-2019   #1
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Voigtlander 90mm f3.5 APO-Lanthar LTM lens

Voigtlander 90mm f3.5 APO-Lanthar LTM lens, Sony A7III camera
Yokohama, Japan - April 2019

I walked into a local camera shop in Yokohama today and there was a used Voigtlander 90mm f3.5 APO-Lanthar LTM lens on the shelf so I bought it and a Kenko L-M adapter ring. The lens is black with a couple small minor scratches on it; the glass is in mint condition. I walked across town to Yokohama Park and started shooting. I’m very impressed with the results.








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Old 04-13-2019   #2
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Old 04-14-2019   #3
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Well! They play nicely together! Can see why you are happy Mike..
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Old 04-14-2019   #4
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Well! They play nicely together! Can see why you are happy Mike..
Yes, thank you, Iím quite happy. Actually Iím feeling giddy! This is fun!

Voigtlander 90mm f3.5 APO-Lanthar LTM lens, Sony A7III camera
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Old 04-14-2019   #5
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Old 04-15-2019   #6
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Old 04-15-2019   #7
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Looks like it's a keeper, Mike! Lovely pictures.
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Old 04-15-2019   #8
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Looks like it's a keeper, Mike! Lovely pictures.
Thank you, Lynn.

It sure is nice when one stumbles onto a lens that one wasnít looking for and it turns out to be such terrific fun to use. The Voigtlander 90mm f3.5 APO-Lanthar LTM lens is so small; heck the filter size is only 39mm. I also like the way the hood screws onto the lens, the hood has internal threads and the lens has external threads. And, the coolest part of all is the three colored rings between the aperture ring and the hood, very distinctive.

Anyway, thank you again, Lynn, for taking the time to check out the images and leave a kind comment.

Mike




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Old 04-16-2019   #9
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Old 04-17-2019   #10
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Old 04-17-2019   #11
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Old 06-03-2019   #12
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Bottom of the picture, left of center.
The Kasumi Bridge over the Shin-Yama****a Canal
1. This bridge was originally manufactured in England and shipped to Japan where it was erected in 1896 as a railway bridge spanning the Sumida River in Tokyo.
2. In 1929 it was moved to the Tsurumi River connecting Yokohama and Kawasaki.
3. In 2013 it was moved to it's present location in Yokohama.


The above picture was taken from the Harbor View Park in Yokohama. This is the rose garden in that park.


This is a rose in the rose garden.


The Voigtlander 90mm f3.5 APO-Lanthar LTM lens is okay by me.
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Old 06-05-2019   #13
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I had one and sold it after a short period of incidental use as I could not really get used to the 90mm focal length. Seeing these nice pictures makes me wonder whether I shouldn't held on to it a little while longer..
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Old 06-07-2019   #14
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Old 07-03-2019   #15
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Old 07-03-2019   #16
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Thanks for those shots Mike. This lens is far more interesting than I ever thought it to be.

As an aside I have just finished re-reading Japanese Inn by Oliver Statler. (I have it in my collection and pick it up to re-read every few years). Though Suruga Bay is a bit to the west of Tokyo Bay where you are, I thought you might be interested in the book if you are not familiar with it. It tells the story of the Minaguchi Ya, a ryokan (no longer in operation) in the village of a feudal post town, named Okitsu on the Tokkaido through several hundred years and in doing so tells the story of that part of Japan's history too (i.e. essentially the Tokugawa era through the Meiji period into the Showa). Quite fascinating for a Japanophile like me. Though parts of it are fictionalized a bit it is still factually correct about the bigger historical aspects.

For a small town Okitsu seems to come up quite a lot in literature - the 1962 film of "The 47 Ronin" (Chushingura) starts in an Okitsu ryokan, the movie "Tokyo Story" has glimpses of the town in its opening scenes, and of course the town is dealt with extensively in the book as well as in Hiroshige's famous prints. In history as well it comes up more than you would expect - Prince Saionji a leading moderate statesman retired and "held court" a lot in Okitsu before and during WW2 where he tried to influence the hardliners to end the war. And Tokugawa Eiyasu founder of the Tokugawa dynasty spent a significant part of his childhood in the Seikenji temple above the town. Fascinating stuff (for me anyway).

It is interesting also to see photos of Okitsu and the Tokkaido back then and compare them, even to images from the 1950s, say when a lot of historical Japan was still intact at least in rural areas less affected by the war. It is kind of sad to see how so much of Japan's history has been lost and built over by super highways. Ah well, that's "progress" I suppose.
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Old 07-03-2019   #17
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Old 07-03-2019   #18
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I wonder how many of these lenses are actually "out there". You never see many for sale at any one time. Being the only lens longer than 75mm Cosina made in either Leica mount, it many never be an expensive collectible, but it's not the easiest to find either.
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Old 07-03-2019   #19
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Originally Posted by peterm1 View Post
Thanks for those shots Mike. This lens is far more interesting than I ever thought it to be.

As an aside I have just finished re-reading Japanese Inn by Oliver Statler. (I have it in my collection and pick it up to re-read every few years). Though Suruga Bay is a bit to the west of Tokyo Bay where you are, I thought you might be interested in the book if you are not familiar with it. It tells the story of the Minaguchi Ya, a ryokan (no longer in operation) in the village of a feudal post town, named Okitsu on the Tokkaido through several hundred years and in doing so tells the story of that part of Japan's history too (i.e. essentially the Tokugawa era through the Meiji period into the Showa). Quite fascinating for a Japanophile like me. Though parts of it are fictionalized a bit it is still factually correct about the bigger historical aspects.

For a small town Okitsu seems to come up quite a lot in literature - the 1962 film of "The 47 Ronin" (Chushingura) starts in an Okitsu ryokan, the movie "Tokyo Story" has glimpses of the town in its opening scenes, and of course the town is dealt with extensively in the book as well as in Hiroshige's famous prints. In history as well it comes up more than you would expect - Prince Saionji a leading moderate statesman retired and "held court" a lot in Okitsu before and during WW2 where he tried to influence the hardliners to end the war. And Tokugawa Eiyasu founder of the Tokugawa dynasty spent a significant part of his childhood in the Seikenji temple above the town. Fascinating stuff (for me anyway).

It is interesting also to see photos of Okitsu and the Tokkaido back then and compare them, even to images from the 1950s, say when a lot of historical Japan was still intact at least in rural areas less affected by the war. It is kind of sad to see how so much of Japan's history has been lost and built over by super highways. Ah well, that's "progress" I suppose.
Hi Peter, and thank you for the book recommendation. Iíll try to check it out. I have one book recommendation for you.

ďA Historical Guide To YokohamaĒ
Sketches of the twice-risen Phoenix
-- Burritt Sabin (author) , Published by Yurindo Co, Ltd 2002

Itís kind of an odd book (some say itís poorly written) but in my opinion a must read for anyone that has visited or plans to visit Yokohama.

Everyone talks about their desire to visit Tokyo, well I think that Yokohama is a much better place to visit. Of course visiting both cities is best.

In conjunction with the book you might want to watch the 1958 John Wayne movie ďThe Barbarian and the GeishaĒ. Itís based on Townsend Harris being sent by President Pierce to Japan to serve as the first U.S. Consul-General. Iím sure there are many movie critics that would say this movie sucks but I think itís pretty good and worth watching. Maybe youíve already seen this movie.

All the best,
Mike
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Old 07-03-2019   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterm1 View Post
For a small town Okitsu seems to come up quite a lot in literature - the 1962 film of "The 47 Ronin" (Chushingura) starts in an Okitsu ryokan, the movie "Tokyo Story" has glimpses of the town in its opening scenes

Slight correction if I may, Peter. The opening scenes of Tokyo Story are all of Onomichi. There a several fan websites (albeit in Japanese) that cover this in detail.
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Old 07-03-2019   #21
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Slight correction if I may, Peter. The opening scenes of Tokyo Story are all of Onomichi. There a several fan websites (albeit in Japanese) that cover this in detail.
In this instance perhaps my terminology was too loose. There is a scene where a train passes what to me looks like Seikenji (situated above Okitsu). It was this I was thinking of. Of course I could be wrong about that as I have not been there but based on many photos I have looked at, it appears very like the way the line passes very close to that temple and the temple depicted, itself looks very much like every photo I have seen of Seikenji. But you appear to know both the movie and the area so please correct me if I am assuming too much.

You can see the scene I refer to, in near the opening of this video in which a modern film maker compares the scenes in Tokyo Story to those in Cafe Lumiere (a movie I have not yet seen). This short movie on Youtube is itself quite nicely done and worth watching if you are a film buff.

Cafe Lumiere - Modernizing Ozu's Tokyo Story.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQDOJaTdzHw
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Old 07-03-2019   #22
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Originally Posted by Yokosuka_Mike View Post
Hi Peter, and thank you for the book recommendation. I’ll try to check it out. I have one book recommendation for you.

“A Historical Guide To Yokohama”
Sketches of the twice-risen Phoenix
-- Burritt Sabin (author) , Published by Yurindo Co, Ltd 2002

It’s kind of an odd book (some say it’s poorly written) but in my opinion a must read for anyone that has visited or plans to visit Yokohama.

Everyone talks about their desire to visit Tokyo, well I think that Yokohama is a much better place to visit. Of course visiting both cities is best.

In conjunction with the book you might want to watch the 1958 John Wayne movie “The Barbarian and the Geisha”. It’s based on Townsend Harris being sent by President Pierce to Japan to serve as the first U.S. Consul-General. I’m sure there are many movie critics that would say this movie sucks but I think it’s pretty good and worth watching. Maybe you’ve already seen this movie.

All the best,
Mike
Thanks for this Mike. I will look into the above with interest. Another book by Oliver Statler I am looking for is one called Japanese Pilgrimage which documents Statler's account of walking the Shikoku Pilgrimage, a thousand-mile trek around that island following the path of an ancient Buddhist master Kukai. There are a number of those walks still available or people to undertake though I doubt many westerners would take the whole walk.

Another book that may interest you is Lost Japan by Alex Kerr. Kerr grew up in Japan (his father was an "occupationaire" (I think this is how they referred to USA occupation force members) and later the son Alex, returned to Japan to live where I think he is still resident. It is worth a read too.
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Old 07-03-2019   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterm1 View Post
You can see the scene I refer to, in near the opening of this video in which a modern film maker compares the scenes in Tokyo Story to those in Cafe Lumiere (a movie I have not yet seen). This short movie on Youtube is itself quite nicely done and worth watching if you are a film buff.
That’s the scene I thought you were referring to. Seikenji is indeed similarly located near the train line, but the temple that appears on the hill in the opening scene of Tokyo Story is Jōdo-ji (pictured below then and now). This temple appears multiple times in the movie (see the In popular culture section at the wiki link). The train line passes by right below the temple.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C5%8Ddo-ji_(Onomichi)

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Old 07-03-2019   #24
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Originally Posted by jonmanjiro View Post
That’s the scene I thought you were referring to. Seikenji is indeed similarly located near the train line, but the temple that appears on the hill in the opening scene of Tokyo Story is Jōdo-ji (pictured below then and now). This temple appears multiple times in the movie (see the In popular culture section at the wiki link). The train line passes by right below the temple.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C5%8Ddo-ji_(Onomichi)
Thank you for that Jonmanjiro. That sets it straight.

I knew that there was a temple from Hiroshima Prefecture at the very beginning scene of the movie as this was claimed by some critics to be a deliberately ominous (but deliberately somewhat obscure) reference to Hiroshima itself by Ozu. But I had understood that the "temple with a train" was a different temple. I imagine I was just assuming that it was based on them leaving Onomichi to travel to Tokyo and therefore was intended to represent something other than their home town and drew the wrong conclusion.

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Old 07-04-2019   #25
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Thank you for that Jonmanjiro. That sets it straight.

I knew that there was a temple from Hiroshima Prefecture at the very beginning scene of the movie as this was claimed by some critics to be a deliberately ominous (but deliberately somewhat obscure) reference to Hiroshima itself by Ozu. But I had understood that the "temple with a train" was a different temple. I imagine I was just assuming that it was based on them leaving Onomichi to travel to Tokyo and therefore was intended to represent something other than their home town and drew the wrong conclusion.

best regards Peter
No worries Peter. I actually mentioned Jōdo-ji in a subsequent post (here) in the recent thread here where we discussed Sumiyoshi Shrine in Onomichi City (the supposedly ominous and obscure temple "somewhere" in Hiroshima), but I guessed you must have missed it.

Anyway to stay on topic, here's a few pics snapped with a CV Apo-Lanther 90/3.5 LTM I used to own. Lovely rendering, but I found the focal length hard to use on a rangefinder so didn't keep the lens for long.


Reflecting by Jon, on Flickr


鎌倉の紅葉 by Jon, on Flickr
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Old 07-04-2019   #26
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No worries Peter. I actually mentioned Jōdo-ji in a subsequent post (here) in the recent thread here where we discussed Sumiyoshi Shrine in Onomichi City (the supposedly ominous and obscure temple "somewhere" in Hiroshima), but I guessed you must have missed it.

Anyway to stay on topic, here's a few pics snapped with a CV Apo-Lanther 90/3.5 LTM I used to own. Lovely rendering, but I found the focal length hard to use on a rangefinder so didn't keep the lens for long.


Reflecting by Jon, on Flickr


鎌倉の紅葉 by Jon, on Flickr
jonmanjiro Thanks for this. Yes this lens looks superb. I am like you in that I struggle to focus longer lens on rangefinder cameras. But I love longer lenses as I find them to be excellent for street photography in two respects - they are more discreet than shorter lenses and they provide good background separation. So now I use them on mirrorless cameras which helps me to some extent deal with the focusing issue. (Which means that my M8 is now something like a surrogate cat - its gets nursed and stroked when I sit by the fire but not so much use as was once the case when my eyesight was better).

I am however kicking myself in that I could have picked up one of these lenses recently at a good price. A camera store near me had one in its window for years where it remained unsold and eventually marked it down for a quick sale. I was not sure how good the lens is and besides I have a few lenses in this range so hardly need yet another 90mm and so put off buying it - and now it is gone. But seeing these images makes me wonder if I was wrong. Ah well, there is always next time.
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Old 07-04-2019   #27
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