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Old 10-30-2018   #41
BillBingham2
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For the few months I lived out on Long Island (North Lindenhurst) I joined and attended a "Camera Club". Got some short term friendships out of it. They had a contest around a topic each month. I found it challenging to think about different ways to fit the topic.

One time they had "What is it?". I staged my wife sitting up in bed holding the covers up with her eyes peeping out looking at the door next to her and a stuffed monster hand coming in the cracked door (light stand holding it up outside the door out of sight). Missed the cutoff, but when I showed it the following week I got a lot of "Never thought of that".

Their style was very different from mine but it gave me a kick in the butt as I missed living in the city.

Not sure what's near you.

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Old 10-30-2018   #42
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Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
I live in northern Michigan, smack dab in the middle of the Lake Michigan lake-effect snowbelt. When the snows starts, normally after Thanksgiving, I often take a break from my photography. Iíve dabble in acrylics and will spend my time painting. I also putz around on the piano. And, if in the mood, Iíll take some pictures. All kind of ways for me to stay artistic and creative.

Jim B.
Not be as talented as I would look to a 4x5 camera and do studies of light and drifts and such during that sort of winter. LF seems to have such a beautiful way of showing subtle differences in tone.

But that's me.

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Old 10-30-2018   #43
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I often have that dilemma. I live in the suburbs of Buffalo, which is grey and boring for months. I typically don’t have time to go into the city, so when I go for photo walks I just focus on things like geometry, patterns, and different things for composition building skills. In my opinion, the composition is what makes the photograph. The more I practice finding them, the better I will be at using them when it counts.
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Old 10-30-2018   #44
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Originally Posted by olifaunt View Post
Beautiful image. Good advice for landscapes, yes, but this doesn't work too well for street photography of moving subjects with slower color film.

This thread inspired me to give up trying to finish my roll of Portra and load some Tri-X that I'm pushing to 1200. Hopefully that will get me out shooting again despite the dreary weather.
I live in Birmingham, UK and it's mostly overcast skies with flat light. B&W for sure is easier to shoot in these conditions, and I mostly push Tri-X to 1600 to give extra contrast.

If you want to shot colour I wouldn't shoot Portra, it's quite muted, especially in flat light. Try something like Lomogrpahy 800 (re-badged 800ISO Kodak Gold/ Ultramax line) which has more contrast and vivid colours. 800ISO helps in bad light. Add flash if possible to add more contrast.
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Old 10-30-2018   #45
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Philip Jones Griffiths did AMAZING work in Wales (as well as everywhere else) and I don't think there are even any hard shadows or shadows at all in those images. I feel like he went to Vietnam and got direct sunlight there.
My favorite photographer who used those subtleties in the dark tones to great effect.

Phil Forrest
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Old 10-30-2018   #46
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I live in Maine, where summer and autumn are gorgeous, but the winters and often the springs are dull and flat. Street photography is often right out because, well, there are so few people that it makes the fishing for an interesting shot nearly interminable. I want to keep shooting, but keep having the feeling that there is "nothing to shoot."

I also recognize that this is a matter of perspective, or a matter of routine. That is--the people who keep shooting during times like this are the ones that get themselves out there to shoot no matter how they're feeling, or whether the world is inspiring them to shoot.

So I wanted to ask the forum, Do any of you have tips/tricks for getting yourself out there when you're feeling unmotivated? Other than taking a special photo "vacation," what do you do to fight a case of the photographic blahs?
I just always bring a camera with me - trusty Ricoh GR that easily slips in and out of pockets, bags, etc or my iphone - as you never really know what you'll run into. No purpose, no intention to shoot, but opportunistic.
Also, for a bit of inspiration, I revisit books and/or scroll through a site like Instagram and view the photos of people/groups I follow.
I mostly enjoy street photography as well, but have gained an appreciation (and draw lots of inspiration from) photographers like Stephen Shore and William Eggleston and the like.
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Old 10-30-2018   #47
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Originally Posted by olifaunt View Post
I would also recommend, for inspiration, studying some of the greats; for example Robert Frank's work in The Americans, much of which was photographed in rural America. Stephen Shore's and Joel Meyerowitz's classic work as well. And some of Garry Winogrand's work in rural areas or Western suburbia, taken in mostly deserted places with figures in interesting landscape compositions, sometimes even from the car, as well as his rural events photography (rodeos, stock fairs, etc.).
Agreed. Add Lee Friedlander to that list.
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Old 10-30-2018   #48
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I don't get out there once I have become bored with the local subject matter. I shoot more on trips, especially to Colorado. Exceptions are the botanical gardens and the Museum of Transportation, both in St. Louis. I keep a membership in both and visit occasionally. This entails re-shooting stuff I have already shot; but then there is always the possibility of a different film, a different light. Or else, noticing a shot not previously seen. Lately I'm in the back yard photographing my rose garden. There is not much in bloom, but I'm striving for an "summer is over, now it's fall, the garden is resting peacefully" look. I make some changes to the garden to get a different look to photograph. It feels a little like Monet building Giverny in order to have something to paint.

I don't go down to the city or the waterfront any more, with or without cameras. St. Louis has become too dangerous. Too bad.
Same in Oakland, Ca. Too dangerous.
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Old 10-30-2018   #49
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I can't give 100% accurate advice. Our town is over 100K now and we are at the edge of fourth largest city in NA.

If not for work I can't afford to go where. Expensive and crappy public transportation, roads are one of the most busiest in NA.
So I'm staying in giant cookie cutter field with remaining crop fields and century old trees getting destroyed every year to dump more cookie cutters.
The original part is small. Main street is five minutes walk, before and after it is nothing special.
How I deal with this? I'm in touch with community. Original one and some newcomers who wants to integrate and not create another place they came from.
I'm interested in local events. Here is no small ones. And people are involved. It is not so much different from street photography. And I get to know more and more people.
I come to events to observe people, just same as I do with street photography.

Basically it is as much to photograph as much as you are interested in local life. Many if not most don't know what we have lake and forests and mountains. They won't bother to go on Christmas parade or at Remembrance Day. It is them who are saying what here is nothing going on. But they are veggies.

And here is always Eggleston and impressionists to learn from.
Many impressionists were staying on plenair and Eggleston is not big cities dweller, if I'm not mistaken.

I use digital cameras to document events, but for creative parts it is film and darkroom prints. With film it opens unlimited tryouts of same spots. With digital, you take it once and it is boring.
If not already, try film.

IMO.

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Old 10-30-2018   #50
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Originally Posted by karateisland View Post
I live in Maine, where summer and autumn are gorgeous, but the winters and often the springs are dull and flat. Street photography is often right out because, well, there are so few people that it makes the fishing for an interesting shot nearly interminable. I want to keep shooting, but keep having the feeling that there is "nothing to shoot."
I'd suggest shooting the nothing. You've already noted the stark contrast that exists between the summer/fall and winter/spring. Use that as your creative focus, capture those differences with your camera, providing a visual interpretation of that you've already observed. See how this plays out over the course of one or more years. Interesting photos are not dependent on people alone. Try to think of some specific locations around you that would best highlight those differences. Places that are full of people in the summer and completely barren in the winter. It's like you have two completely different places to capture with your camera without having to leave where you live. Embrace the dull and flat for the contrast it provides and then group your photos by the location, shown over the course of the seasons.

Thoughts are cheap, that's mine, lol.
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Old 10-30-2018   #51
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First thing is, there is always something to photograph. Might not seem interesting to you, but it may to others. And it doesn't necessarily have to be a recognizable subject. Could just be some shadows, or the way the lines of a fence and surrounding buildings lead you to someplace else.

Yesterday I went to a nearby town because I find it more picturesque than where I live. Not many folks on the street, even though there is a lot of auto traffic through the center. But the buildings have nice details, front and back, and the place is kept nice and clean.

One of my methods is to find a place to set, and just look around from that vantage point. I noticed a fine juxtaposition of the town clock with many US flags, and the courthouse tower in the background. Then the roof line of the building directly across the street had some interesting ceramic tile vents. To my right, a pergola caught my attention in the afternoon light.

But no one will see those photos unless I can get back there with a properly functioning camera. Turned out the one I was using wasn't advancing the film. So I'm saving those for another day.

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Old 10-31-2018   #52
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I go through periods of lack of inspiration, there are projects on the go but due to logistics or whatever they can't be done and so struggle with the will to do stuff. When this hits I tend to look at other photographers work, frequently look at the work of artists I have not fully investigated yet . Normally this gets me motivated enough or gives me a loose idea of something that might be interesting to follow, don't follow their work style to the letter more using as a jumping off point. Another idea is to keep a notebook just for project ideas or even ideas for one end image, writing down ideas helps remember ones you have had and seeing it on paper can help me see ones that are just plain daft.
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Old 10-31-2018   #53
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Jeez louise, put the camera in your hand and walk out the front door. Take pictures of whatever is in front of you.

Now that youíre unsatisfied with that, go back in the house and pour yourself a glass of whisky; drink the whisky.

Go back out the front door with the camera in your hand and take pictures of all the things that make you smile.

Next morning when you wake up with a headache and a bunch of lousy pictures think about what you did wrong and then start to think about creativity. Think about seeing things through your eyes. Finding the extraordinary in the ordinary. If you canít do this maybe photography is not your creative outlet. Itís okay to enjoy photography and not be good at it. I like to paint with watercolors and I really suck at it - well, maybe I donít suck but Iím not very good.

Anyway, if youíre in a rut, your in a rut. Go to the Words/No words forums and see what the rest of us are doing and maybe youíll get some inspiration.

When all else fails, pour yourself a glass of whisky; drink the whiskyÖ

Hang in there!
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Old 10-31-2018   #54
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There are no boring subjects, only bored photographers.
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Old 10-31-2018   #55
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Why not just photograph the boring stuff? It'll be gone one day and you'll notice and wish you had a photo...


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Old 10-31-2018   #56
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What you are thinking about or not consciously thinking about may surface during your wanderings. Perhaps something in the news or some emotion may connect with what you see and trigger an idea and the camera shutter release. Some artists (like Edward Hopper) and psyche theorists (like Carl Jung) suggested that much of art arises from our subconscious.

I was wandering one day with nothing much in mind when I came across a building with a repetitive pattern. It triggered a response from inside my head, probably from the threats of deportation in the news (then and now) and my feelings about this. The picture and my interpretive title resulted.

Let your imagination wander and see what turns up. You never know!




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Old 10-31-2018   #57
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I have been hanging back, not daring to say anything, lest I interrupt the steady flow of awesome tactics for getting yourself out there when it doesn't feel right. I appreciate the advice so much.


One thing I've noticed is the way that Film/Digital can balance each other out: as a friend once said, each camera has a soul, and brings out different things in the way we shoot. I think I'll be bringing out my Rollei when I need to look closer at light/texture/shape, and my X100 when I need to let myself shoot lots of whatever without worrying about the cost.


Anyway, lots of wonderful advice in here. Keep it coming--I'm sure I'm not the only one who could use strategies for getting out there.
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Old 10-31-2018   #58
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Originally Posted by karateisland View Post
One thing I've noticed is the way that Film/Digital can balance each other out: as a friend once said, each camera has a soul, and brings out different things in the way we shoot. I think I'll be bringing out my Rollei when I need to look closer at light/texture/shape, and my X100 when I need to let myself shoot lots of whatever without worrying about the cost.
Phones too! Using a phone tends to sweep away all constraints, so you end up snapping things without thought, simply... because! I find my phone a brilliant visual notebook, and looking through what I've snapped often gives me ideas on "proper" photos I'd like to take.
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Old 10-31-2018   #59
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Jeez louise, put the camera in your hand and walk out the front door. Take pictures of whatever is in front of you.

Now that you’re unsatisfied with that, go back in the house and pour yourself a glass of whisky; drink the whisky.
Or in Maine, pot. It inspires. A lot!
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Old 10-31-2018   #60
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"Think small".

Many years ago, a local camera repairman gave me this suggestion when I complained to him that "the beach looks the same to me" after taking many beach photos.

He meant that I should focus on small things around me. There is always something (small) that is interesting.
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Old 10-31-2018   #61
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As many on RFF, I am seldom without some sort of camera. It's a joy a privilege to afford this hobby. Personally, when carrying a camera becomes an irritant, when that little machine begins to make a demand to "use me", I become aware that I need to leave it at home for a few hours or days, and figure out what it is that I am avoiding. But that's me. Sometimes I peruse the RFF archives for inspiration.
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Old 10-31-2018   #62
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Raid—I love that bit of advice. Most of what I photograph are 'big' things—buildings, cityscapes, vistas, and the sort. focusing on something tiny within that landscape is a fresh view.

There's a lot of great suggestions in this thread, and I'm trying to think what I can contribute. One quote I come back to is from Garry Winogrand, "I photograph to find out what something will look like photographed." That ethos bothered my professor when I was learning on LF, but reminds me of when I first picked up a camera and pointed it at literally everything. Sometimes it's not the subject that's interesting, but the contrast, tonality, texture that draws you. The subject could be anything, and could render itself abstractly in the final image.

I'm a lifelong city dweller, so you'd think I'd have a never-ending source of inspiration in the street, but it does get overstimulating and tired at times. I read somewhere that hundreds of photos of Pike Place Market are uploaded to Instagram a day, and when I visit I just want to grab some kale and a bottle of wine and get out, and think, "well, everything has already been photographed by now." I've carried a camera with me nearly every day for as long as I can remember, but the last few years I just wasn't shooting anything. Partly, I was more interested in experiencing whatever I was doing than futzing with a camera, but it can be both.

And with Seattle weather being what it is right now, stalking the streets for hours just makes you damp and cold. Travel is fresh and exciting, but simply out of the question right now. Lately I've turned to whatever I can find inside my house to burn film or batteries on. Sometimes it's experimenting with lighting on whatever I'm cooking for the day. This morning, it was chasing the cat around with an old Nikon D2. I know these aren't ever going to get printed, but it's in that spirit of seeing what things look like photographed. Lull times are time to experiment.

The other approach I'm fond of is that of Bernd and Hilla Becher, whom I learned of in architecture school: pick a single subject and photograph the hell out of it. You might get interesting images out of it, or learn something new on the subject, or develop a new interest to turn into a photographic idea.

A few things snapped me out of my funk, none of which required exotic travel or packing in a ton of gear. Last month I was at the state fair, and the sheer sensory experience was enough inspiration to photograph whatever caught my interest, even down to the bizarre hot tub displays. The last few weeks, I've been stopping by the zoo, and while there are plenty of guys with thousands of dollars of kit trying to photograph the animals through plexiglass (with flash!), I've been turning my camera away from the exhibits and towards them and the other characters that visit. Lastly, as I've started my final semester of grad school, I've made an effort of shooting social gatherings with my colleagues as a bit of a keepsake, but without withdrawing from the event. That one's been fun: I bring a Sunpak potato masher flash and everyone hams it up for the camera.

Sometimes you just have to give yourself an assignment, even if you know it won't be printed. And that's the fun of it.
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Old 11-01-2018   #63
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I tell myself to get closer and closer to a subject. Look for light. Practice composition. And sometimes an idea or relationship can be revealed.

In the end it is a chance to get out and move around.
Quote:
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"Think small".

Many years ago, a local camera repairman gave me this suggestion when I complained to him that "the beach looks the same to me" after taking many beach photos.

He meant that I should focus on small things around me. There is always something (small) that is interesting.
I usually manage to get out of the house once a day for about 30-45mins, for a coffee with my wife. I noticed the light through the carafe and water glasses on the cafe tables in front of me, and this started a project on cafe tables.

daveoo and Raid's suggestions are useful, look for the light and the small things. Do you have a macro lens? Most of these were taken with a normal lens.

The other thing is, what feelings do you have when you're out in your local area? Is there any way you can express those feelings in photographs?







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Old 11-01-2018   #64
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If you normally shoot with a WA 28 or 35, say, then taking a longer lens like 85, 90 or 100 will give you a new way of seeing...


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Old 11-01-2018   #65
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For getting closer to your subject I find Giacomo Brunelli's stuff quite inspiring for when I'm in a creative slump and not sure what to photography in the city. Just something simple like a man in a hat can make an amazing photo

http://www.giacomobrunelli.com/works.php
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Old 11-01-2018   #66
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I have recently purchased Adam Marelli's Udemy courses on the elements of photography--have already gotten a fair amount of his lecture/homework assignments about figure/ground relationship.


https://www.udemy.com/a-room-for-imp...ure-to-ground/



Practicing composition is a good motivation for getting out there. Like shooting hoops.
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Old 11-01-2018   #67
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There is always something to shoot for free.

Finding someone who is willing pay me for shooting is more difficult.
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Old 11-05-2018   #68
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Road trips, even day trips, can help. Byways in upstate NY yesterday and saw tons of very dramatic scenes. Lots of the type of American gothic stuff you'll find in Maine too, even more dramatic in winter probably, plus old drive in theater, deer running up a hill, landscapes with "melted" houses, deer carcass hanging in front of a house, etc., etc. Incidental things you notice that you don't necessarily expect; you just have to get out.
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Old 11-05-2018   #69
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If you embrace the notion that you are the eyes of the world there is always something calling out to be seen. Minor White put it well.

ďI have often photographed when I am not in tune with nature but the photographs look as if I had been. So I conclude that something in nature says, ĎCome and take my photograph.í So I do, regardless of how I feel.Ē Ė Minor White

Substitute anything you want for nature and you'll see the world will call out to you.
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Old 11-24-2018   #70
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I have two or three projects I'm working on, and something visual usually catches my eye as I drive along. Sometimes not. These can include handpainted signs, lawn ornaments and other odd bits of roadside detritus. Some little weird detail can call to me. I can't always stop and photograph it, but I try to mentally file it for later.

I always carry a rangefinder loaded with black-and-white film, and a DSLR for color. And a tripod.

I live in NW New Mexico, which is fairly scenic - if you enjoy rocks, dust and tumbleweeds, that is. Lots of low clouds, as it is a mile above sea level. Not much greenery here, I'm afraid.

We're in a fairly bad drought, so when it rains lightly at the college where I work, some of the ceramics/pottery people come out and dance - artists. =) It's a New Mexico thing.
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Old 12-09-2018   #71
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I know this might sound backwards but why not just take a break?

Sometimes when you sit and think 'Oh I must do this' you can put too much pressure on yourself and take they joy and passion out of it, if you don't worry about it for a while you may suddenly one day go 'You know what I'd like to take some pictures today' and start seeing inspirations in things.
By all means leave a Camera in your bag or car but don't have the mindset of I must use it and you may find soon enough it'll be in your hand just photographing a passing moment that caught your eye.
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Old 12-18-2018   #72
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