Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Being a Photographer > Off Topic

Off Topic Feel like venting or just passing a joke? If so, do it here. Please keep it clean. Minors do visit this site.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

OT: What to look when buying a Chef's Knife?
Old 11-22-2006   #1
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
OT: What to look when buying a Chef's Knife?

Ok, i know this is a bit OT...
I'm buying 2 or 3 "good" knives this christmas, like a self gift...
But, i dont know nothing about this theme. Now, what i realy wanted is a place to start looking, like a "RFF" for knives.
Where
do you look when you want to buy a good knife?
Offcourse, personal advices on brands or anything are very welcome.
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #2
back alley
IMAGES
 
back alley's Avatar
 
back alley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: true north strong & free
Posts: 49,196
ask rob, i believe he knows a thing or 2 about knives. (rbeimer, that is)

joe
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #3
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
Tks Joe. I'll send him a pm, maybe he would like to share his know-how here
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #4
Flow
Registered User
 
Flow is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 112
Basically if you want a good knife that'd last you a long time you'd want to get a nice forged knive instead of a cheapo stamped one. It should feel good on your hand and chef's knife comes in different length of 8 to 14 inches so you should find a length that is comfortable to you. The most popular brands are Wustof and Henckels, both of them has many different series with different prices and quality. Kyocera makes freakishly sharp ceramic knives but I find them too short and it is a hassel you have to send them back to be sharpened. Me myself I use a 10 inch Kershaw chef's knive. If you take good care of your knife it should last you a long while. Just remember to never sharpen it yourself (but you can hone it).
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #5
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
Thanks for the advices Flow. Do you cook professionaly?
Why cant i sharppen it and whats the difference between sharppening and honing? Sorry
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #6
dexdog
sans bokeh
 
dexdog's Avatar
 
dexdog is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,346
agree with above poster. Heavy duty full-tang forged knives are the best. Lots of choices in blade materials and handle designs/materials. Test-driving a knife is important so that you can choose one that fits your hand well and feels comfortable to use. (similar to cameras in that regard, eh?).

I have a set of Wusthof Classics that I bought 20 years ago that still perform fine, with occasional touch-ups on a diamond stone.
__________________
_____________________
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #7
JoeFriday
Agent Provacateur
 
JoeFriday's Avatar
 
JoeFriday is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,585
I highly recommend the Global line of knives.. they have excellent reviews and are extremely well balanced
__________________
Brett

"I asked the doctor to take your picture so I could look at you from inside as well" ~the Vapors

Do you flickr?
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #8
anandi
Gotta catch the light.
 
anandi's Avatar
 
anandi is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: ottawa
Posts: 185
Hey since we're talking about knives, what's a Santoku knife? I too have been slowly adding to the kitchen knife collection and after concluding that cooking is much more enjoyable with a good knife was also in the midst of educating myself on this topic. I have a good paring knife and Chef's knife (both Henkels) and a utility knife made in Portugal - I'd like to get a good carving knife for the turkeys an roast chickens, and wondered what else should I have and why?
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #9
KoNickon
Nick Merritt
 
KoNickon is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hartford, CT USA
Age: 61
Posts: 3,107
If you're looking for a top quality American-made line of knives, Lamsonsharp (Shelburne Falls, MA) is fully competitive with the others.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #10
Flow
Registered User
 
Flow is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 112
Global are great knives. I do not like them much becuase their handle feels a bit weird to me. But everyone's different when it comes to knives and every cook will have their own opinion. Restaurants do not use the same type of knives we use for the home. The one in restaurants are often forged but with bright coloured plastic or resin handles for safety and sanitation.

Honing if when you but a honing steel (there are steel and diamond ones), that look kinda like a sword except it is a round stick. It is for straightening the little tiny dents and offsets when you cut with your knife. Sharpening is you need to use a wetstone (I'm not a fan of electric sharpeners) and you need to dull your knive first then sharpen then with progressively finer sharpening medium (stones, etc). I usually send my knife out to sharpen since it is cheap to do so and pros sharpeners really know their stuff and I do not want to ruin my sort of expensive knife.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #11
Flow
Registered User
 
Flow is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 112
Santoku is a Japanese style chef's knife.

I did not mention Lamsonsharp since I see pedro.m.reis' location is in Portugal and I am ot sure if it is easy to find there...
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #12
KoNickon
Nick Merritt
 
KoNickon is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hartford, CT USA
Age: 61
Posts: 3,107
Santoku knives are a Japanese design -- the sides of the knife are ground out at even intervals running perpendicular to the blade. I think the idea is that the hollows help with making thin cuts.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #13
KoNickon
Nick Merritt
 
KoNickon is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hartford, CT USA
Age: 61
Posts: 3,107
Ah, sorry, I didn't notice he was in Portugal. Better to go for European like Wusthof or Henckels. Sabatier knives are great too.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #14
Flow
Registered User
 
Flow is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 112
Ohhh since we're at it now, about 90% of the time profesional kitchen use only chef's knife and paring knife.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #15
dexdog
sans bokeh
 
dexdog's Avatar
 
dexdog is offline
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,346
a santuko is a knife of Japanese origin designed for slicing. The blade is usually 2 to 3 inches tall, but very thin (1/8 inch), and has shallow flutes cut out of the sides of the blade to minimize the chance of wet food sticking to it. Also, the santuko design has very little "rocker" or curve on the bottom, unlike most chef's knives, which have a fair amount of rocker. Great for slicing vegetables, raw fish and meats. Not especially suitable for chopping due to lighter construction and small amount of rocker on the bottom.
__________________
_____________________
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #16
Kim
Registered User
 
Kim is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 10
I would recommend Wustof or Henkels. I have been using Wustof for the past 5 years and my parents have a Henkel set for over 15 years. I feel that both are about equal in quality. Try the handle to see which is more comfortable in your hands (this is very important). I use a 8" chef knife (I find the 6" too small and 10" too large personally). The Wustof Santoku (with flutes) version of the chef knife is used by Rachel Ray. I think this design allows the food to stick less but I have the regular version. I have a set of Wustof knives but I generally only need the chef knife, a paring knife and the bread knife.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #17
anandi
Gotta catch the light.
 
anandi's Avatar
 
anandi is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: ottawa
Posts: 185
Thanks for the advice on knives. Here's the link to a line of knives available in Canada by President's Choice

The utility knife that I got to try seems as good as any of my Henkel's knife, and since it's made in Portugal, it must be available there by the manufacturer under some other brand. They're a really good buy. The Bessa of the knife world perhaps
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #18
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
Never saw that brand "president's choice" on sale here .... maybe i'm looking on the wrong places .
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #19
anandi
Gotta catch the light.
 
anandi's Avatar
 
anandi is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: ottawa
Posts: 185
That's because you should have been looking for the "escolha do Jorge Sampaio" brand
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #20
Trius
Waiting on Maitani
 
Trius's Avatar
 
Trius is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Rochester, NY & Toronto area
Posts: 8,257
A few years ago I bought my (now) wife the 10" Grohman forged chef's knife. The next day I got a phone call from here, all she said was "I'm in love!" ... and she didn't mean with me, even though she was.

These are not cheap knives, but it feels good in my hands, and the weight helps to make chopping and slicing easier. If I had it to do over again I would buy the resin handles (Xtra product line); the wood is beautiful but the upkeep of the wood for something that is a kitchen tool is a bit of a bother.
__________________
My Gallery Flickr
Fine grain is a bourgeois concept

Happiness is APX100 and Rodinal 1:100

A bunch o cameras. Does it really matter?
And NOW ... Fuji X-Pro1 w/ 18-55, 18/2 & adapted Zuikos and Hexanons
http://zuikoholic.tumblr.com
https://www.instagram.com/e.r.dunbar/
http://weedram.blogspot.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #21
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
Ehehhe, not quite. Now the President is Cavaco Silva


Quote:
Originally Posted by anandi
That's because you should have been looking for the "escolha do Jorge Sampaio" brand
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #22
Flyfisher Tom
Registered User
 
Flyfisher Tom's Avatar
 
Flyfisher Tom is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: on the river ...
Posts: 1,974
Wusthof

craftsmanship bar none
__________________
regards,

Tom
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #23
jgeenen
Registered User
 
jgeenen is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Eschborn, Germany
Age: 60
Posts: 69
Pedro, "Sharpness" is far away from being off-topic. Isn't owning a razor-sharp lens we all dream about (at least sometimes)? But most of the time not the sharpness of the lens counts but other factors from focussing to contrast and movements. But back to the knives:

I use Zwilling knifes (the very durable "Professional" line) for all-day purposes and a really razor-sharp santoku knife (shun series from kai).

The styles I use most are the large santoku (18cm blade) or Zwilling's chef's knife (20cm) for vegetables and meat without bones and the short peeling knife with curved blade (7cm) for peeling (especially fruit). The third one is a carving or filetting knife with flexible blade). I especially like the long blades - even for small things like garlic or ginger.

All these knifes last for many years, just with occasional sharpening (my Zwilling chef's knife needs some professional sharpening after 15 years of use).
__________________
Johannes

My photo blog

Using Leica, Zeiss and Olympus gear
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #24
brachal
Refrigerated User
 
brachal's Avatar
 
brachal is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New Orleans, La
Age: 51
Posts: 1,021
Wustof, Henckels, and Sabatier are all excellent kitchen knives. For a chef's knife, I prefer the 10 inch size, but that may be too much for some people. Go with what feels good. Look for a handle that's comfortable to you. The correct way to hold one is with your thumb and knuckle of your index finger on the blade -- not gripping the handle. Make sure that the edge of the blade has enough curve that the knife has a comfortable rocking motion on the board -- this will make chopping easier.

You can sharpen it yourself if you take the time to learn how -- practice on something cheap until you "get it". Otherwise Lansky makes a sharpening system that is pretty near idiot-proof. If you maintain the edge on the kitchen steel you won't need to sharpen on the stone very often. I use the steel every other time I use the knife, and my chefs knife hasn't had to go to the stone in 3 years. The key to honing is to maintain a constant angle between the blade and the steel, and to alternate strokes on each side of the blade.
__________________
Bill

My Gallery

Me on flickr

"Living in fear is just another way of dying before your time." DBT
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #25
eric
[was]: emaquiling
 
eric's Avatar
 
eric is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: in my house
Age: 53
Posts: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedro.m.reis
Ok, i know this is a bit OT...

Offcourse, personal advices on brands or anything are very welcome.
Hello Pedro,
Just like cameras, it depends on how much you want to spend. Not sure if you can get Wustoffs where you are in general, they are just about the Leica's in knives. They all have secret formulas on the amount of carbon to stainless in them.
Look for a knife that is a full tang. The blade goes all the way to the tip of the handle. I prefer a larger chef's knife (anything larger than a 10")
Santokus have been around for a while and while some of the posts are true to the design, its just been kinda recent to have it fluted. Yes Rachel Ray made it more popular. I've used Santokus for a while now. I do like the flutes but older ones don't have a flute. So by definition, its the shape of the knife not the shape+flutes. You can, by the way, get a chef's knife that is fluted. The idea is, the knife creates a vacume when it comes in contact with liquid (cutting meat) and it "sticks". Think of putting a saran wrap on a wet table and pull, it kinda grabs it. Now put marbles under and pull and you'll notice that the added air pockets made it able to pull out.
And yes, I am a professional with a culinary degree. Before culinary school, I worked as an assistant photographer to many and was assistant to a food photographer and we used large formats. Now I private chef, and teach at a culinary school. I also teach a knife skills class. I just finished doing a guest chef lecture for the past 3 days doing the bread curicullum for professional culinary students.
Oh, my avatar are a pair of Grand Prix Wustoffs
__________________
Eric
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #26
jan normandale
Film is the other way
 
jan normandale's Avatar
 
jan normandale is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: on Location
Posts: 3,910
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeFriday
I highly recommend the Global line of knives.. they have excellent reviews and are extremely well balanced
Joe show us "your knives that don't entirely suck" ;- )

Eric.. I always wondered what those knives were. Now I know.
__________________
RFF Gallery
flickr
Blog

it's all about light

Last edited by jan normandale : 11-22-2006 at 15:08.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #27
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
I see that Wustof have many fans here .

Where i live it may be possible to get these knives, but i realy dont know where. So i must buy in the Net. I'm trying to spend about 150 with this self gift, but i was hpping to get mora than 1 knife
Since it seems that there are some experts here, so with "only" 150 what would be your starters kit? I prefer less with more quality.
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #28
eric
[was]: emaquiling
 
eric's Avatar
 
eric is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: in my house
Age: 53
Posts: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedro.m.reis
Since it seems that there are some experts here, so with "only" 150 what would be your starters kit? I prefer less with more quality.
If you go to a professional kitchen store, you can find what we call in American "House knives" or the ones that stay in the kitchen for everyone to use. They are usually inexpensive and have plastic handles. They are NSF rated as well. All knives are sharp just like most lenses are sharp. Always buy a steel and contantly hone it.
I do bring my knife kit when I cook at people's homes or at the culinary school but the knife I use at home is a $5.99 chinese cleaver. I just sharpen it all the time with a steel and use a stone about 1x a month.
Alway, alway, always use a steel and it'll keep sharp most of the time. The recommendation to buy a stone and practice is really good. Do that with a cheap knife.
__________________
Eric
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #29
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by eric
If you go to a professional kitchen store, you can find what we call in American "House knives" or the ones that stay in the kitchen for everyone to use.
The problem is to find one here . I beleive that exists, but the ones i visit had litle choice in knives, only 1 brand normally.
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #30
eric
[was]: emaquiling
 
eric's Avatar
 
eric is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: in my house
Age: 53
Posts: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedro.m.reis
The problem is to find one here . I beleive that exists, but the ones i visit had litle choice in knives, only 1 brand normally.
Usually its one brand. Don't get confused with "house knife" as in your house. I mean "house knife" as the knife that stays in the restaurant kitchen. They are usually very inexpensive (easily replacable in the restaurant and sometimes they tend to "disappear").
__________________
Eric
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #31
back alley
IMAGES
 
back alley's Avatar
 
back alley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: true north strong & free
Posts: 49,196
this group can talk about anything...

ok, you know my history with a can of compressed air...now think about me with a really sharp knife...

i still like a good buck myself but in the kitchen it's henkel.

joe
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #32
rbiemer
Unabashed Amateur
 
rbiemer's Avatar
 
rbiemer is offline
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Cortland, NY
Age: 59
Posts: 4,996
Quote:
Originally Posted by back alley
ask rob, i believe he knows a thing or 2 about knives. (rbeimer, that is)
joe
Thanks, joe! I'm not at home tonight or tomorrow(at the folks' cooking turkey) so I missed the discussion up to now.
Pedro, I really can only echo what the other folks here have posted.
I will add one other thing: With knives it is critical that you get to somewhere that you can hold them(at least--it's better if you can use them a little) before you buy. It is very important that the knife fit you. We talk about how a camera "feels in the hand" etc around here. Well that fit is more important with a knife. If you get a camera that doesn't suit you, it is annoying and hard to work with. If you get a knife that doesn't suit you, it could be very bad indeed. I don't want to get too specific because I don't feel like tempting fate but a poor camera choice might lead to bad pictures. A poor knife choice might lead to blood loss.
That said, I own Wustoff Trident. If I were to choose again, I would be looking at: Wustoff, Henkels(I'm sure I'm misspelling that) and Sabatier.
And I would base my choice on which one felt most natural to me.
My personal knives are an 8" Chef's, an off-set serrated knife, and a small paring knife. At work we have most of the different knives (these are rented--we have a sharpening service that changes the knives out once a month) these are the "house knives" and they are cheap but sturdy.
And I end up using three: The sharpest chefs knife, a paring knife, and a serrated.
I have thought about a ceramic knife for home but I don't think they would stand up to the day to day wear at work.
And I do sharpen my knives. I can't recall the last time I had my chef knife on a stone but probably sometime in the spring; I do use a steel frequently.
Sorry I missed all the fun here today!
Rob
__________________

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.
--Mark Twain
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #33
Trius
Waiting on Maitani
 
Trius's Avatar
 
Trius is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Rochester, NY & Toronto area
Posts: 8,257
I'll also add a vote for Sabatier, but from limited experience. I bought an 8"chef at a local "markdown" store (TJ Maxx), and I really like it. Not as hefty as my Grohman, but it holds an edge really well.
__________________
My Gallery Flickr
Fine grain is a bourgeois concept

Happiness is APX100 and Rodinal 1:100

A bunch o cameras. Does it really matter?
And NOW ... Fuji X-Pro1 w/ 18-55, 18/2 & adapted Zuikos and Hexanons
http://zuikoholic.tumblr.com
https://www.instagram.com/e.r.dunbar/
http://weedram.blogspot.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #34
Bill58
Native Texan
 
Bill58's Avatar
 
Bill58 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: So. Korea
Posts: 2,980
Do a google search for a "forged handmade knives." There are many makers, mostly in the USA but some in Europe as well, who make such a tool. Nothing beats forged steel for sharpness and durability. One of the best steels is high carbon for ease of sharpening and edge retention--but not stainless. You'll have a knife for a lifetime.
__________________
My images of a strange land-So. Korea:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wrs111445/
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #35
John Rountree
Nothing is what I want
 
John Rountree is offline
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Black Mountain, NC
Posts: 340
A nifty little tool to keep your knives in tip top shape is a Chantry knife "sharpener." I really isn't a sharpener, but a honing tool. It was designed several decades ago for the British slaughter house butchers. What makes it so good is the steels (there are two of them) are pre-set at the correct angle to properly hone a knife. Use it often and your knives will last a long time. Sells for about $35 - 50 USD. It is also very easy to use, just run the knife back and forth like you are slicing bread. Do this about 10 times and you will be amazed at the edge.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-22-2006   #36
Taqi
Registered User
 
Taqi's Avatar
 
Taqi is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands.
Posts: 66
Smile

Latecomer to this, but I can thoroughly recommend global knives - well balanced, good hardened blade which holds its sharpness, but easily sharpened with 2 or 3 strokes over a one buck whetstone. I've had several of varying sizes and I can honestly say they are all outstanding, much better than sabatiers I've used. If I had to choose just one I'd pick the 20cm chefs knife. But I suppose it's just like lenses, you can always use one more...

I can honestly say that the best 30 quid I have so far spent was on a global knife (I dont work for them honest!!!) - the inestimable pleasure of dissecting tomatoes...
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-23-2006   #37
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
Thanks all for the nice comments and advices. I'm no near to make a decision , but i'll try to get some knives on hand to test them.
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-23-2006   #38
Stephanie Brim
Mental Experimental.
 
Stephanie Brim's Avatar
 
Stephanie Brim is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Iowa
Age: 36
Posts: 2,854
Hah, I'm finally getting knives, too (a Shun paring and a Ken Onion chefs because it felt the best in my hands), and a couple of the Calphalon One pans I've been wanting. Trust me...get good cookware and knives and you'll want to cook all the time.

As to my knife choices...

I was told by numerous people, chefs and home cooks alike, to go and actually feel the knives in my hands before I decided on any one brand. I decided to go with Shun, particularly the Ken Onion chefs knife, because they felt the best in my hands. When you go testing, make sure to test the balance of the knife as well as the heft. It should feel weighty but not really heavy. I'm going to have three knives when I'm done with things: my chefs, the paring, and a flexible fillet knife. Those are the things that I use the most in the kitchen. The fillet knife is going to be a Global.

I suggest the Calphalon Katana series, the Wusthof Grand Prix 2 series, and the Shun Pro series knives. Also, try out the Ken Onion knife by Shun. It's about twice as much as other chefs knives, but the thing is very well made.
__________________

I had a baby girl on December 6, 2007. Yay motherhood!


One camera. Two lenses. Three shots per week.

2008 Street Photography Project
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-23-2006   #39
Stephanie Brim
Mental Experimental.
 
Stephanie Brim's Avatar
 
Stephanie Brim is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Iowa
Age: 36
Posts: 2,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by eric
Usually its one brand. Don't get confused with "house knife" as in your house. I mean "house knife" as the knife that stays in the restaurant kitchen. They are usually very inexpensive (easily replacable in the restaurant and sometimes they tend to "disappear").
My knives will travel with me everywhere I go. I don't plan on leaving them in any restaurant I work in. In fact, even the truck stop that I worked in for one day (long story, that, and I'd share if you really want to know) allowed you to bring your own knives in for morning prep...it was one of the things I was told that day while I was being given orientation. My knives are just that: my knives. Even at home, no one touches my knives under penalty of a death glare and perhaps my incredibly scathing verbal lashing.
__________________

I had a baby girl on December 6, 2007. Yay motherhood!


One camera. Two lenses. Three shots per week.

2008 Street Photography Project
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-23-2006   #40
pedro.m.reis
Newbie but eager to learn
 
pedro.m.reis's Avatar
 
pedro.m.reis is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Age: 46
Posts: 428
One last question, i watch those cooking progams in the TV. Allways the chef can cut some vegies, like onions, and the veggies dont get "glued" to the knive. Never could do that. Kim has said that some knives have "flutes" that can prevent the sticking, but in TV they use regular knives. Its the technic? Its the steel? The design? All the above?

BTW i found a store that sells Henckels knives and handled some. I'm starting to understand why they cost 3x or 4x the knives i own now
__________________
Pedro Reis

Flickr

My Humble RRF Gallery
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Buying a used R-D1 - what to look for? ChristianD Epson R-D1 Leica M mount Digital Rangefinder 9 11-14-2006 23:33
March Challenge: Photo and no equipment buying raid Rangefinder Photography Discussion 296 04-01-2006 13:01
Buying a Bessa R jonasv Voigtlander Bessa Leica Mount Cameras 20 02-28-2006 08:41



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:39.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.