Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Coffee With Mentors > Roger Hicks -- Author of The Rangefinder Book

Roger Hicks -- Author of The Rangefinder Book

Roger Hicks is a well known photographic writer, author of The Rangefinder Book, over three dozen other photographic books, and a frequent contributor to Shutterbug and Amateur Photographer. Unusually in today's photographic world, most of his camera reviews are film cameras, especially rangefinders. See www.rogerandfrances.com for further background (Frances is his wife Frances Schultz, acknowledged darkroom addict and fellow Shutterbug contributor) .


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Old 07-16-2008   #81
myoptic3
Registered User
 
myoptic3 is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 232
ChrisN,
Sadly, I did just that. Went out and shot what I thought were killer photos one morning w/ a camera I don't shoot w/ much. I noticed that the film advance seemed unusually smooth and light about the 5th shot. Hmm, I thought, this camera seems a lot nicer than I remembered. Then I looked to see what film was in it. Surprise! It was a roll of that invisible film. It's funny now but I felt pretty silly at the time. Fortunately, I have made FAR worse mistakes, so it was no big deal. It's all relative.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-19-2008   #82
sheepdog
Available darkness.
 
sheepdog's Avatar
 
sheepdog is offline
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Norway
Age: 35
Posts: 95
Had a trip where everything went kinda awry last year.. Brought my analog and my digital maxxum 7s with good glass, and my m3 cv 21 and 35mm as well as a laptop. I saw this as a mostly digital adventure maybe with the occasional K64 shot as I'd gotten 4 rolls earlier that spring.

Upon arriving in Turkey (i'd used the m3 as my pocketcam thus far), I discovered that I'd brought 3 nearly empty batteries for the 7D and ... no charger. I think I managed 20 shots with it in all.

The local one-hour only carried Fuji Superia 200, so I shot some of that as well as the K64. Upon receiving the rolls back from Dwayne's a month later, I noticed that I had messed up my exposed/unexposed system and therefore exposed one roll twice, while another was blank. These two rolls on one ofcourse contained all the most memorable pictures..


This year I went with the 7D (with batteries and TWO chargers), and the M3. Used the latter more often, with the dSLR coming in handy for stitched panoramas and the like.
__________________
M3
Skopar 21/4, Ultron 35/1.7, Heliar 50/2, Canon 50/1.2, Canon 85/2
Lots of Minolta SLR gear.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-20-2008   #83
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofdanang View Post
You know, I may just do that. I've dug out one tank and reels and ordered up some fresh chemistry. Four wooden clothespins and the hotel bathroom will have to serve till I investigate the tent further. I'm trying to keep everything that I need for four months on the road in two carry-on-sized roll-aboard suitcases.
The tent is a big bugger, about the size of a large cricket bag when collapsed: perhaps 3 foot long and a foot square, so if you're flying frequently, it's not really an option. But if you're travelling by car, it's well worth thinking about.

Carry three yards/metres of nylon string to make 'clothes-lines' whenever needed: often, the shower/bathtub layout is some way from ideal for film drying.

Alternatively/as well, bend some wire S-shaped hooks to hook over things. Straightened-out BIG paper-clips are useful, especially the plastic-coated variety.

You can easily process even sheet film with one of these:

http://www.rogerandfrances.com/photo...20orbital.html

Cheers,

R.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-20-2008   #84
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheepdog View Post
Upon arriving in Turkey (i'd used the m3 as my pocketcam thus far), I discovered that I'd brought 3 nearly empty batteries for the 7D and ... no charger. I think I managed 20 shots with it in all.

The local one-hour only carried Fuji Superia 200...
Then the pro-digi 'batteries aren't a problem' brigade starts calling you names for being so careless/ stupid/ non-anal-retentive -- as though you hadn't beaten yourself up enough already!

But it's certainly a lot easier to find film than a new Canon charger. Or laptop charger. My US/EU 110v/220v converter blew itself and the charger up in Germany when I was covering photokina a few years back and I had hell's own job (and considerable expense) in finding a replacement charger locally: obviously mail order wasn't much use. Easier now with multi-voltage chargers but you need a lot of plug adapters or pieces of electric string if you travel much.

And your experience with the Superia is why I ALWAYS wind film off completely (leader in) -- much harder to double-expose.

Cheers,

R.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-20-2008   #85
kkdanamatt
Registered User
 
kkdanamatt's Avatar
 
kkdanamatt is offline
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 286
I had a brand new 105mm Nikkor fail to stop down during an extended West Coast vacation in 1970. All my Kodachromes were horribly overexposed. Years later, I went to Europe for the month of October in 1984. First stop: Cologne for Photokina. My Leica CL's light meter quit on the very first day! Thank God the Leica techs at the Leitz booth were able to fix it the same day. Since then I've always carried a backup body and lens on every trip.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-20-2008   #86
mike goldberg
The Peaceful Pacific
 
mike goldberg's Avatar
 
mike goldberg is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Jerusalem [Bostonian]
Posts: 1,080
Hi all,
I just happened onto this Thread, and I'm delighted to hear of the popularity of the Oly 35 RC. I had some difficulty in focusing mine, and Ruben got in under the top plate, and installed a small piece of ND gel near the RF. Voila; this darkens the field of view somewhat, and it's much better. Yes, the Oly RC is a great small camera with a terrific lens.
__________________
We find our Destiny on the road we take to avoid it.
~ Carl Jung


Mikes Faves:

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/mik...7622599834937/
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-21-2008   #87
kalokeri
larger than 35mm
 
kalokeri is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Europa
Posts: 278
Has anyone had a problem with taking just one camera that then breaks/is lost or stolen/otherwise fails to deliver the goods?

Never had that kind of problem, but I always fear I will.

Travelling light aka one camera/one lens is really liberating. But a backup like you suggested is always a good idea as long as you don´t have to take it with you all the time ...

Thomas
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-02-2008   #88
dee
Registered User
 
dee's Avatar
 
dee is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: M25 south UK
Posts: 1,861
Hmmm .
I am strictly an amateur considered snapshooter , so usually take more than I will ever NEED ...
Buy I am a pro Designer / illustrator of Interiors, so would I venture out withot a spre pencil , Rapdograph pen nibs , pens , eraser etc ?
Would I heck !
Back Up is essential when someone is payimg me to achieve a result .
In any field , I guess ?
__________________
Amedeo Contaxed Leica M8 + Brian Sweeney J3 + Helios .CV 35mm f2.5 Fed 50 collapsible
Classic Leica Dig3 / Panasonic L1 Olympus zooms
Quirky Pentax K-S1
Fuji X-Pro 1 and X-M1 joined by neat X-T1

Contax/Kiev hybrids - Contax II silver /tan , Contax III + Kiev IV meter etc , Contax II , Kiev shutter from parts camera .
Minolta SR1s/SR7v/SRTs various !

Puns,Cameras and snapshots keeping ASD and dees'ruptive Girl/Boy/Me?' dee'structive dee'sorientation contained.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-02-2008   #89
wlewisiii
StayAtHome Dad & Photog
 
wlewisiii's Avatar
 
wlewisiii is offline
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Madison, WI
Age: 56
Posts: 5,259
Went on my annual whitetail deer hunting & Thanksgiving trip this past week. I only took my Kiev 4a with an uncoated (prewar) collapsible 50/2.8 Tessar for the lens. I got a few good landscapes of the woods I was in but before the big family function for Thanksgiving, the camera decided to stop working. No family snappies this year.

This is not as big a deal as if I'd been on assignment, but it does remind me of Roger's OP and the delemma it poses. I had enough things to carry and so decided against a second camera (probably would have been my Contaflex) and chose the Kiev by default as due to a fall on a concrete sidewalk, my Contax II was already out of service.

I'm no closer to a solution as I prefer the idea of a one camer and one or two lens setup. But the reality of problems is there. Wish I could afford a R2C as that would be a big help to me at times like this.

William
__________________
My Gallery
My Best Pictures

Playing and learning daily with: 4x5 Crown Graphic, Leica IIIf w/ 50/2 Summitar, Nikon F2 Photomic w/ 50/1.4 & Olympus E-PL1.

"Some people are 'the glass is half full' types. Some people are 'the glass is half empty' types. I'm a 'the glass is full of radioactive waste and I just drank half of it' type. And I'm still thirsty." -- Bill Mattocks
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-02-2008   #90
FrankS
Registered User
 
FrankS's Avatar
 
FrankS is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Canada, eh.
Age: 62
Posts: 19,391
The beauty of carrying/using 2 bodies is that it allows you to use different film emulsions in each, either B+W and colour, or different film speeds; it allows the use of 2 different focal length lenses without the need to change lenses in the field; and if one camera decides to pack it in, you have a backup body to continue shooting with.

Now, I'm not suggesting that you need to carry 2 bodies on your way to the village corner store to buy a newspaper and cigarettes in the morning, but if you are away from home and plan to be taking pictures, I believe it would be prudent. Certainly if you are on a paid assignment and certainly if you are on holiday. I have 2 M2s for this reason.
__________________
my little website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

photography makes me happy

Last edited by FrankS : 12-02-2008 at 14:24.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-02-2008   #91
Lilserenity
Registered User
 
Lilserenity is offline
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Worthing, W Sx
Age: 36
Posts: 1,028
I have tended to carry my Oly XA as my notebook and backup camera and the EOS 3 as the main camera. The XA is so small and light that when in my pack on big hikes (most recently a week of walking 100 miles) I never notice it. So it's a quality small backup. I was only walking with a 35mm prime anyway. As it happens I had Delta 400 loaded in the XA and HP5+/Tri-X in the EOS 3. The XA never got used.

That said, when I do the North Downs Way (131 miles) I'll again take the XA but my main camera will be my Leica M2 which I'm picking up on Saturday all being well. But a backup is important to me. I like to travel light but I remember when my EOS 5 died a few years ago, and how did that spoil Christmas for me. I do get the grumps when things don't work*.

(* : And this is why I question why I ever ended up working with computers!)
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-02-2008   #92
dreamsandart
Registered User
 
dreamsandart's Avatar
 
dreamsandart is offline
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Japan
Posts: 519
Maybe I've been lucky... On a 2 year bicycle trip it was just an M4 and a couple lens, no problems. And although making photographs is one of my main enjoyments 'seeing' when I travel I still carry just one camera. Having a very high quality compact outfit is my main consideration and not being loaded down with gear that can make the type of travel I do a backache. I'm basically a one camera, one lens (at a time) kind of photographer anyway. For the last 10 years or so even though I have a great Leica outfit I've taken a single Rolleiflex (love the square and big picture), also without problems in dust and cold/heat.

Now that said all it would take is a one time camera failure to change this. And if I was going some place where I really thought I was going to be changing lenses a lot I would probably take a couple cameras (one Leica and the Rollei or two Leicas) with the idea I had a 'back-up', but till then I guess I'll stick with the easy to carry way to go - knock on wood.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-02-2008   #93
Rob-F
Likes Leicas
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Age: 78
Posts: 6,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Patterson View Post
That depends on where one is going. A few years ago, I took three cameras to Durango, CO for a rail charter trip.
@Al: Sounds like maybe you took the Durango-Silverton Narrow Gauge railway (DSNGRR)?

@Roger (et. al.) My Leica M2 was my only camera for about 10 or 12 years, before I started buying more stuff. It went all over the world with me, Asia, Europe, SW United States. Never a failure. I did manage to break my Nikon FE2 transport during a Colorado trip. Fortunately, I had a spare FE2 as a backup, plus the M2.
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2008   #94
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilserenity View Post
That said, when I do the North Downs Way (131 miles) I'll again take the XA but my main camera will be my Leica M2 which I'm picking up on Saturday all being well. But a backup is important to me. I like to travel light but I remember when my EOS 5 died a few years ago, and how did that spoil Christmas for me. I do get the grumps when things don't work*.

(* : And this is why I question why I ever ended up working with computers!)
Love the footnote!

Like others, I've had very few camera failures in 40+ years, but as you say, it only takes one...

And as a dear, long-deceased friend once said, "I don't think I'd bother to travel unless I could take my camera." He was my gaffer when I started as an assistant in London in the 70s. Photography is clearly more important to some of us than to others.

Cheers,

Roger
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2008   #95
SimonSawSunlight
userabuser
 
SimonSawSunlight's Avatar
 
SimonSawSunlight is online now
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Berlin
Age: 31
Posts: 2,959
I often take LOADS of gear. different bodies, different lenses, film and digital, sometimes even 2 dslrs, because they all lead to a different way of photography and therefore to a more versatile view on the whole trip. but I mostly end up using my Leica M4, my EOS 1D and maybe one of my yashica 124 / 124g almost all of the time and the rest, such as my canonet ql17 giii, my yashica 44s or the minolta x-700 system only come out for special use.
when the weather really sucks big time, I'm happy that I have my Nikon f5-tank to rely on (although the 1D and the m4 tolerate a lot, but I somehow feel less anxious about the f5. plus it can serve very well in terms of self defense. you never know!).
then again, I just take the m4 with me on some trips - as it is my all mechanical, trusty and sturdy everyday/everywhere camera - and happen one more body + 1 lens max, if any.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2008   #96
Frank Petronio
-
 
Frank Petronio's Avatar
 
Frank Petronio is offline
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rochester, NY, USA
Posts: 1,868
I think theft is a greater risk than break down, so I don't want to be leaving spare Leicas in hotel rooms or rental cars, much less checked baggage. If I can't carry it, it shouldn't come.

A credit card is your best spare camera on vacation. Unless you are on an expedition or off in the third world, you're never more than 45 minutes away from a perfectly usable $500 D40 or Rebel from a Walmart or Best Buy. You can always resell it for a slight loss later. Even the $90 digital cameras they sell in the Supermarket/Drug store aren't so bad.

It's easy enough to bring extra digital or 35mm cameras on a serious job, even 120 cameras, but once you start getting into large format it makes more sense to bring tape, tools, and a spare ground glass.

The busiest local pro in my town has twin Mamiya-Phase One set-ups, $80K invested. He says he simply has to have a back up and doubles the price of everything he buys. It's a shame he's a hack! lol
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2008   #97
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Petronio View Post
I think theft is a greater risk than break down, so I don't want to be leaving spare Leicas in hotel rooms or rental cars, much less checked baggage. If I can't carry it, it shouldn't come.

A credit card is your best spare camera on vacation. Unless you are on an expedition or off in the third world, you're never more than 45 minutes away from a perfectly usable $500 D40 or Rebel from a Walmart or Best Buy. You can always resell it for a slight loss later. Even the $90 digital cameras they sell in the Supermarket/Drug store aren't so bad.

It's easy enough to bring extra digital or 35mm cameras on a serious job, even 120 cameras, but once you start getting into large format it makes more sense to bring tape, tools, and a spare ground glass.
First bold and second: agree completely.

Third bold: disagree completely. Even if you're in the USA and don't mind an unfamiliar camera with a rubbish standard zoom, it's a lot quicker to pull out your other Leica than to go from Bug Tussle, Arizona to the nearest city with a camera store. Elsewhere in the world: do YOU know where to look for a camera in Lyon, or Athens, or Madras?

Fourth bold: and a spare lens in shutter, of course. In fact you can always fake the ground glass.

Cheers,

R.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2008   #98
parsec1
parsec1
 
parsec1 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Essex England
Posts: 454
Bought a couple of Nikon F90x's in 1996. Both packed up on me on third use in the middle of a riot. (Live animal export protestors) phoned Nikon and got the usual'please leave a messge'crap so held up my cell to record the riot and left a 'terse ' message about their new cameras. Next day Nikon biked two new bodies down to me. Now almost totaly dig but always carry a Leica M film camera 'just in case'.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-03-2008   #99
parsec1
parsec1
 
parsec1 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Essex England
Posts: 454
By the way Roger if you still think press photography is 'irrellevent' take a look at the whole page pic on page 5 of todays Sun by my friend and collegue Arthur Edwards. For those not able to view it a whole page pic of a Para back from Afghanistan missing a left arm and two legs who still managed to walk to HRH Prince Charles to recieve his bravery decorations.
If that pic does not do something to your emotions I would respectfully suggest another planet might suit you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #100
alcaraban
Registered User
 
alcaraban is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Badajoz, Spain
Age: 43
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
do YOU know where to look for a camera in Lyon, or Athens, or Madras?
I'm unsure about Madras. In Athens, Lyon (well, in Lyon there is a lovely gentleman that sells second-hand equipment... but I think that's not the point) or Chicago, I could have one of my other bodies at the nearest DHL office in less than two days if I can phone my brother in Spain. I usually carry a mechanical fixed lens rangefinder just in case, though.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #101
ClaremontPhoto
Jon Claremont
 
ClaremontPhoto's Avatar
 
ClaremontPhoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Alentejo
Posts: 5,242
I haven't read every post on this thread; but sufficient to get the flavor.

Why do so many of us buy the very best there is, typically a Leica, and then take a back up in case it doesn't work?

It's been working fine for many years so why should it stop working next week?

Next time I travel I really must take a back up Omega watch, a back up Nokia phone, and a back up Mercedes-Benz.
__________________
.

R.I.P. 2009

Jon


ClaremontPhoto


Box of Chocolates
A Gray Area
Panoramic
Friends & Neighbors



"I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me." Noel Coward
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #102
alcaraban
Registered User
 
alcaraban is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Badajoz, Spain
Age: 43
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaremontPhoto View Post
It's been working fine for many years so why should it stop working next week?
Murphy's Law, I guess.

Nevertheless, none of my cameras (cheap as they are: fed-2. yashica fx-3, contax 139, ricoh 500g, minolta hi-matic 7s and maxxum 7) has ever stopped working except because exhausted batteries. I traveled to Lisbon last March with just a body and a lens with total confidence.

By the way, if you ever get bored of Montemor you are welcome at my apartment in Badajoz.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #103
ClaremontPhoto
Jon Claremont
 
ClaremontPhoto's Avatar
 
ClaremontPhoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Alentejo
Posts: 5,242
Quote:
Originally Posted by alcaraban View Post
By the way, if you ever get bored of Montemor you are welcome at my apartment in Badajoz.
Many thanks. You are most generous. I'll remember that.

I've always wanted to photograph that modern bridge (the one that we take from Portugal to the hypermarkets) and also the weird underground car park at El Corte Ingles.

I'd also like to photograph inside the dining places at Pryca hypermarket and similar - they are so banal and totally dull. I wouldn't eat in there though; I tried it once!

Badajoz is a very fine city just 1km or so over the border, and yet so different from Portugal.
__________________
.

R.I.P. 2009

Jon


ClaremontPhoto


Box of Chocolates
A Gray Area
Panoramic
Friends & Neighbors



"I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me." Noel Coward

Last edited by ClaremontPhoto : 12-04-2008 at 11:55.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #104
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by parsec1 View Post
By the way Roger if you still think press photography is 'irrellevent' take a look at the whole page pic on page 5 of todays Sun by my friend and collegue Arthur Edwards. For those not able to view it a whole page pic of a Para back from Afghanistan missing a left arm and two legs who still managed to walk to HRH Prince Charles to recieve his bravery decorations.
If that pic does not do something to your emotions I would respectfully suggest another planet might suit you.
I'd be the last to deny the power and importance of press photography, so there are two possibilities.

1 You are confusing me with someone else

2 You have grievously misunderstood something I have written. If that was the result of lack of clarity on my part I apologize and I'd be grateful if you could point out where it is so that I can clarify it.

Cheers,

Roger
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #105
parsec1
parsec1
 
parsec1 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Essex England
Posts: 454
Evening Roger,
Perhaps there may have been some misunderstandings.
Afew months ago there was a 'discord' on this forum regarding the M8. I was complaing that the camera was made up of the cheapest components available with very poor quality packed into an over expensive body and ultimatley
sold on the basis of the Leica stamp at a price which was far in excess of it true photographic capacity...hence the need for upgrades and then inevitably an M8.2 which in itself isn't worth the extra cost.
Having used Nikons and Leicas for years I had expected something much better.
It was at this time you said and I quote "Press photography is largely irrellevant"
Regards
Peter D
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #106
parsec1
parsec1
 
parsec1 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Essex England
Posts: 454
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonSawSunlight View Post
I often take LOADS of gear. different bodies, different lenses, film and digital, sometimes even 2 dslrs, because they all lead to a different way of photography and therefore to a more versatile view on the whole trip. but I mostly end up using my Leica M4, my EOS 1D and maybe one of my yashica 124 / 124g almost all of the time and the rest, such as my canonet ql17 giii, my yashica 44s or the minolta x-700 system only come out for special use.
when the weather really sucks big time, I'm happy that I have my Nikon f5-tank to rely on (although the 1D and the m4 tolerate a lot, but I somehow feel less anxious about the f5. plus it can serve very well in terms of self defense. you never know!).
then again, I just take the m4 with me on some trips - as it is my all mechanical, trusty and sturdy everyday/everywhere camera - and happen one more body + 1 lens max, if any.
At the Daily Express (and no I'm not 'name dropping' I worked there !) the chief photographer was a Victor Blackman some may even have heard of him, anyway we were sent to a 'race riot' in a notorious part of London ,I shan't mention the locale as things have changed there, approached by a large group of rioters hell bent on stopping us shooting (pictures) Vic suggested we swing our Leicas on the end of the straps in circles to 'dissuade them' it worked but there were a few thuds. Making it back to the office we checked over our M4ps wiped off the blood and hair and put them back in the bags for the next days work. Those were the days. LOL

Last edited by parsec1 : 12-04-2008 at 14:52.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-04-2008   #107
Ruvy
Registered User
 
Ruvy is offline
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Israel
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisN View Post
I took my Pentax dSLR out for a walk once, and forgot to put in a memory card. I felt very silly.

Anyone ever forgotten the film?
This one is funny - many like this have happen to me during the years the most amusing (scary?) was opening the camera to get the memory card and seeing its not there... Being resourceful I have connected the camera directly to the computer and..... all the images were there (no card in the camera)... didn't take long to realize my card have been sitting in the card reader... During unpacking I simply forget I have placed it there earlier... Age does wonders - with time, events get more creative than me.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-05-2008   #108
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by parsec1 View Post
Evening Roger,
Perhaps there may have been some misunderstandings.
Afew months ago there was a 'discord' on this forum regarding the M8. I was complaing that the camera was made up of the cheapest components available with very poor quality packed into an over expensive body and ultimatley
sold on the basis of the Leica stamp at a price which was far in excess of it true photographic capacity...hence the need for upgrades and then inevitably an M8.2 which in itself isn't worth the extra cost.
Having used Nikons and Leicas for years I had expected something much better.
It was at this time you said and I quote "Press photography is largely irrellevant"
Regards
Peter D
Dear Peter,

Could you provide a little more context?

To the way that most non-press photographers shoot, yes, press photography (in the sense of which camera to use, and how) is irrelevant. Getting the shot, and getting it back to the newspaper, take precedence over almost everything else.

Thus for an amateur (or indeed a fashion photographer or an advertising photographer or indeed just about anyone except a press photographer) to model his camera choice on what the press uses is as foolish as for a press photographer to use only a tripod-mounted 8x10.

This is a very long way from saying that press photography is irrelevant qua photography, and I apologize if I did not make this sufficiently clear at the time.

Thanks for giving me the opportunity to clarify this.

Cheers,

Roger
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-05-2008   #109
parsec1
parsec1
 
parsec1 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Essex England
Posts: 454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Dear Peter,

Could you provide a little more context?

To the way that most non-press photographers shoot, yes, press photography (in the sense of which camera to use, and how) is irrelevant. Getting the shot, and getting it back to the newspaper, take precedence over almost everything els
Thus for an amateur (or indeed a fashion photographer or an advertising photographer or indeed just about anyone except a press photographer) to model his camera choice on what the press uses is as foolish as for a press photographer to use only a tripod-mounted 8x10.

This is a very long way from saying that press photography is irrelevant qua photography, and I apologize if I did not make this sufficiently clear at the time.

Thanks for giving me the opportunity to clarify this.

Cheers,

Roger
Dear Roger,
Perhaps I was very fortunate but because of a weekend/school break job at a local camera shop I was able in the early 1960s to buy as my first serious camera.. a Leica M2 and a 35mm. I also belonged to the local camera club and a 15 yr old with a Leica did not go down very well with many of its members and even less so when I won a couple of photographic awards using it. After Uni and because of an odd incident, I was on a train that was derailed killing some people and I photographed it using my last 5 flashbulbs on my M2. Phoned the 'Mirror' and was asked to get a taxi and bring it to their then Holborn office. The 'heady' atmosphere in the newsroom and
my first publication.....a front page and two inside pages on the Daily Mirror and I was 'hooked'.
Lets not confuse the importance of getting a picture back to the office to 'getting the shot'.
Very rarely do you turn up at a news 'job' take a 'snap' straight away and run which seems to be the view of many of the less well informed on this forum. As for cameras as you must be aware there was for most of us only Nikon, Pentax (Just hold a pentax) and Leica. That also applied to the many amatuers who were inspired to own one of these cameras.
Now we are spoilt for choice in fact there are too many cameras on the market now and the usual conversation is what kind of camera do you own rather than can I see some of the pictures you have shot.
I retell the story of a couple of years ago.I was in Southend using a couple of Contax G2's one with a 21 and v/f along comes this guy parading the promenade with a huge dslr and a 18 to 500mm or whatever zoom sticking out of his midrift and turning his nose up said to me" Wow thats a couple of 'oldies' you've got there." Such is the power of some camera manufacturers and their advertisers to brainwash us in to buying what they want us to have rather than what we actually require.Hence no more G2s or a decent digital M.
Regards
Peter.
PS the success of the Bessa's and Cosinas and the reputation of the new Zeiss M lenses might be a good time for a rethink about the current obsession with 'plastic dslr's'.
P

Last edited by parsec1 : 12-05-2008 at 09:01.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-05-2008   #110
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by parsec1 View Post
Dear Roger,
Perhaps I was very fortunate but because of a weekend/school break job at a local camera shop I was able in the early 1960s to buy as my first serious camera.. a Leica M2 and a 35mm. I also belonged to the local camera club and a 15 yr old with a Leica did not go down very well with many of its members and even less so when I won a couple of photographic awards using it. After Uni and because of an odd incident, I was on a train that was derailed killing some people and I photographed it using my last 5 flashbulbs on my M2. Phoned the 'Mirror' and was asked to get a taxi and bring it to their then Holborn office. The 'heady' atmosphere in the newsroom and
my first publication.....a front page and two inside pages on the Daily Mirror and I was 'hooked'.
Lets not confuse the importance of getting a picture back to the office to 'getting the shot'.
Very rarely do you turn up at a news 'job' take a 'snap' straight away and run which seems to be the view of many of the less well informed on this forum. As for cameras as you must be aware there was for most of us only Nikon, Pentax (Just hold a pentax) and Leica. That also applied to the many amatuers who were inspired to own one of these cameras.
Now we are spoilt for choice in fact there are too many cameras on the market now and the usual conversation is what kind of camera do you own rather than can I see some of the pictures you have shot.
I retell the story of a couple of years ago.I was in Southend using a couple of Contax G2's one with a 21 and v/f along comes this guy parading the promenade with a huge dslr and a 18 to 500mm or whatever zoom sticking out of his midrift and turning his nose up said to me" Wow thats a couple of 'oldies' you've got there." Such is the power of some camera manufacturers and their advertisers to brainwash us in to buying what they want us to have rather than what we actually require.Hence no more G2s or a decent digital M.
Regards
Peter.
PS the success of the Bessa's and Cosinas and the reputation of the new Zeiss M lenses might be a good time for a rethink about the current obsession with 'plastic dslr's'.
P
Dear Peter,

We are in very substantial agreement, except that I took it for granted that 'getting the shot' means 'getting a BLOODY GOOD shot' -- which means we are in agreement too. Likewise about Nikon, Pentax and Leica.

I'm not totally convinced by your 'down' on the M8 but I'll cheerfully agree that I'd rather rely 110% on a 'real' (film) Leica, though I have to ask myself if this is simply lack of experience of the reliability of M8s (mine hasn't failed yet, though it's ony at about 10,000 pictures -- I had the problem of counter resetting with unformatted cards) plus the fact that the internet by its nature attracts whingers in disproportionate numbers.

As for falling short of perfection, well, you must remember the F36 motor drive, which worked perfectly half the time, and the other half the time shot off the rest of the roll.

Cheers,

Roger
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-05-2008   #111
parsec1
parsec1
 
parsec1 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Essex England
Posts: 454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Dear Peter,

We are in very substantial agreement, except that I took it for granted that 'getting the shot' means 'getting a BLOODY GOOD shot' -- which means we are in agreement too. Likewise about Nikon, Pentax and Leica.

I'm not totally convinced by your 'down' on the M8 but I'll cheerfully agree that I'd rather rely 110% on a 'real' (film) Leica, though I have to ask myself if this is simply lack of experience of the reliability of M8s (mine hasn't failed yet, though it's ony at about 10,000 pictures -- I had the problem of counter resetting with unformatted cards) plus the fact that the internet by its nature attracts whingers in disproportionate numbers.

As for falling short of perfection, well, you must remember the F36 motor drive, which worked perfectly half the time, and the other half the time shot off the rest of the roll.

Cheers,

Roger
Good evening Roger,
Thank you for taking the time to engage in this disscussion with me.
It does indeed seem there is 'substantial agreement' between us..... including that F36 'thing'.
I wish you and the 'Mrs' good fortune in the future.

Very best regards
Peter D
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-05-2008   #112
Turtle
Registered User
 
Turtle is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 2,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaremontPhoto View Post
I'd only ever take one camera.

So long as it was a quality camera.

Why buy a good camera, and then take a back up?
Because even good cameras go wrong...

I normally take only one camera if just popping out for the day but on big trips - rarely, although I did take only my Mamiya 7 to india recently due to weight/bulk considerations.

Normally I would take two on a big trip, such as two MPs or Mamiya 7 and MP.

Just is not worth being in some remote location with no working camera. Two Leicas can be a wonderful combo because of small size and speed of handling. I am really looking forward to my next India trip which will probably done this way. 2 x M, 3-4 lenses (prob 21,28,50 and maybe 90)
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-06-2008   #113
lawrence
Registered User
 
lawrence's Avatar
 
lawrence is offline
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: London, UK
Age: 68
Posts: 2,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turtle View Post
I am really looking forward to my next India trip which will probably done this way. 2 x M, 3-4 lenses (prob 21,28,50 and maybe 90)
I agree about the Leicas. I have two M6TTL (0.58 & 0.72) and my lenses are 21,28,35 & 50 (the 28 on the 0.58 and the 35 on the 0.72).

Somewhat off-topic but how do you feel about visiting India after the recent events there? Personally I have always wanted to go to Rajasthan because my great-grandfather photographed there during the 1860s.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-06-2008   #114
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by alcaraban View Post
I'm unsure about Madras. In Athens, Lyon (well, in Lyon there is a lovely gentleman that sells second-hand equipment... but I think that's not the point) or Chicago, I could have one of my other bodies at the nearest DHL office in less than two days if I can phone my brother in Spain. I usually carry a mechanical fixed lens rangefinder just in case, though.
Ummm....

Two days without shooting. Let's suppose you're in Dharamsala on March 9th, 2009, seat of the Tibetan Government in Exile, and your camera packs up. March 10th is the 50th anniversary of the Lhasa Uprising against the Chinese invasion in 1959.

Or for that matter you're at Arles for the Rencontres; just the first week. Two days is a third of your shooting time.

Or even that you're shooting ballerinas 15 miles from home. If one body packs up, it's only an hour's round trip -- and the end of the dance class. (That's the last time one of my Leicas packed up, an M2, some time in the 90s. Of course I had a backup).

Carrying a second body sounds like REALLY cheap insurance. What's an M2 cost nowadays, after all?

Cheers,

R.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-06-2008   #115
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawrence View Post
ISomewhat off-topic but how do you feel about visiting India after the recent events there? Personally I have always wanted to go to Rajasthan because my great-grandfather photographed there during the 1860s.
200 people out of 1.1 billion died, and another 300-odd were wounded. Of course that was a tragedy for those who died or were injured, but so is a motor accident, a considerably greater risk.

Viewed rationally, terrorism in India (or most other countries) is not a risk I'm going to lose sleep over. I'm thinking of going back next year and the slaughter in Mumbai is not a factor that will sway my choice.

Cheers,

Roger

Last edited by Roger Hicks : 12-06-2008 at 10:22.
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-06-2008   #116
JoeV
Thin Air, Bright Sun
 
JoeV's Avatar
 
JoeV is offline
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA
Posts: 1,703
Interesting point, Roger. This article quotes Bruce Schneier, the noted security expert, who has frequently commented (and written several books) about the tradeoffs of the security business. As he indicates, terrorism, although highly in the public's mind, is by statistics a rather rare phenomenon.

Yet my heart goes out to the victims and their families. And all those who are yet to be affected by the "collateral damage."

~Joe
__________________
"If your eye is clear, your whole body will be full of light"

Inventor of the Light Pipe Array
My Blog
My latest book
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-07-2008   #117
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeV View Post
Yet my heart goes out to the victims and their families. And all those who are yet to be affected by the "collateral damage."~Joe
Dear Joe,

Of course!

But this is also why I believe in treating terrorists like common criminals, rather than inventing special laws to glorify them.

The perception of risk and the reality of risk are often very different -- as is illustrated on this very forum whenever child photography is discussed. The big risk of child molestation is from relatives and friends of the family; the risk from strangers on the internet, or indeed from passers-by with cameras, is incalculably small.

Last night I was talking to a friend about this, and he pointed out that the risk of being caught up in something like the Mumbai atrocities, for a visitor, is even more vanishingly small than I suggested.

For easy mathematics, let's say there were 500 killed and wounded out of 1,000,000,000. Odds: 2,000,000:1 against. Now let's say that one quarter of these were visitors/tourists. Odds: 8,000,000:1 against. Now let's say that the odds of such an attack are once every 5 years (60 months) and that you are there for 6 months. Odds: 80,000,000:1 against. If you're there for a month it's 480,000,000:1 against; at ten days, it easily tops a billion to one.

Of course some locations are higher risk than others, but even so, you'd need to be incredibly unlucky.

Cheers,

Roger
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-08-2008   #118
SimonSawSunlight
userabuser
 
SimonSawSunlight's Avatar
 
SimonSawSunlight is online now
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Berlin
Age: 31
Posts: 2,959
Quote:
Originally Posted by parsec1 View Post
At the Daily Express (and no I'm not 'name dropping' I worked there !) the chief photographer was a Victor Blackman some may even have heard of him, anyway we were sent to a 'race riot' in a notorious part of London ,I shan't mention the locale as things have changed there, approached by a large group of rioters hell bent on stopping us shooting (pictures) Vic suggested we swing our Leicas on the end of the straps in circles to 'dissuade them' it worked but there were a few thuds. Making it back to the office we checked over our M4ps wiped off the blood and hair and put them back in the bags for the next days work. Those were the days. LOL
better don't try that with mrs big fat nikon f5, it could bring you to jail for a long long time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lawrence View Post
I agree about the Leicas. I have two M6TTL (0.58 & 0.72) and my lenses are 21,28,35 & 50 (the 28 on the 0.58 and the 35 on the 0.72).

Somewhat off-topic but how do you feel about visiting India after the recent events there? Personally I have always wanted to go to Rajasthan because my great-grandfather photographed there during the 1860s.
and I thought you were going to sell your m6 due to lack of reliability
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-08-2008   #119
lawrence
Registered User
 
lawrence's Avatar
 
lawrence is offline
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: London, UK
Age: 68
Posts: 2,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Viewed rationally, terrorism in India (or most other countries) is not a risk I'm going to lose sleep over. I'm thinking of going back next year and the slaughter in Mumbai is not a factor that will sway my choice.
While I agree with you on a rational level, there's another level to this as far as friends and relations are concerned. Sadly I have had to cancel my Indian trip for this year and now off to South America instead (I guess this is just asking for an earthquake in Lima).
  Reply With Quote

Old 12-08-2008   #120
tom_uk
Registered User
 
tom_uk is offline
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Dear Joe,

Of course!

But this is also why I believe in treating terrorists like common criminals, rather than inventing special laws to glorify them.

The perception of risk and the reality of risk are often very different -- as is illustrated on this very forum whenever child photography is discussed. The big risk of child molestation is from relatives and friends of the family; the risk from strangers on the internet, or indeed from passers-by with cameras, is incalculably small.

(snipped for brevity - apologies, Roger)
Apologies for keep this thread firmly off-topic, but I found the UK Government's 'National Risk Register' a very interesting document. Here's a link:
http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/repo..._register.aspx

Basically, they agree that terrorist attacks, although quite likely, don't present a very 'high risk' to the country and its society (though terrible and fatal for those involved, of course, and I don't minimise the impact on them). No, the biggest risk the country faces is a major influenza pandemic. "Up to one-half of the UK's population could become infected, and between 50,000 and 750,000 additional deaths (....) may have occurred by the end of a pandemic..... Normal life is likely to face wider social and economic disruption, significant threats to the continuity of essential services....".

I was pleased to see the document published, and disappointed that it raised so little public discussion.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 14:05.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.