Leitz sumptuous item name codes
Old 11-04-2018   #1
lxmike
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Leitz sumptuous item name codes

I love everything to do with screw thread leicas, l adore the craftsmanship, the gadgets, but most of all l love the names items have such as SBLOO and so forth. I am sure this question may have been asked and answered before, how, what when and why did Leitz employ such codes to their items, was there a logical system behind the names?
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Old 11-04-2018   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lxmike View Post
I love everything to do with screw thread leicas, l adore the craftsmanship, the gadgets, but most of all l love the names items have such as SBLOO and so forth. I am sure this question may have been asked and answered before, how, what when and why did Leitz employ such codes to their items, was there a logical system behind the names?
Leitz used the five letter code names sorted alphabetically. Leitz introduced code names for their products in 1928, so that orders by dealers could be placed by telegraph without extra confusion. Since about 1959, Leica has used five digit numeric values instead of the well loved code names.
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Old 11-04-2018   #3
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Originally Posted by xayraa33 View Post
Leitz used the five letter code names sorted alphabetically. Leitz introduced code names for their products in 1928, so that orders by dealers could be placed by telegraph without extra confusion. Since about 1959, Leica has used five digit numeric values instead of the well loved code names.
thank you this is both helpful and interesting
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Old 11-04-2018   #4
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Well, without any doubt the best one is: NOOKY.

Doesn't mean anything in German, and I guess it cannot be found in standard bilingual dictionaries ....

Hmmm... probably an English speaking maker should have made, for their German speaking consumers' equivalent amusement, a "SCHNACKSI", or so
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Old 11-04-2018   #5
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Well, without any doubt the best one is: NOOKY.

Doesn't mean anything in German, and I guess it cannot be found in standard bilingual dictionaries ....

Hmmm... probably an English speaking maker should have made, for their German speaking consumers' equivalent amusement, a "SCHNACKSI", or so
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Old 11-04-2018   #6
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There is some method in a sea of madness, for instance codes beginning with P are generally filters, R is mostly used for Reprovit copy stand equipment, and many early binoculars had a code starting with B.
The best ones however are the ones that sound something like what they were.
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Old 11-05-2018   #7
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Firstly, it was best for telegrams as 5 unit codes counted as one word. And letters were simpler to transmit by hand in Morse.

Secondly, numbers are limited to a few thousand combinations (10x10x10x10x10) and letters mean 26x26x26x26x26.

Lastly, these codes were commonplace in the days of telegrams; f'instance Bentley's and C&W's.

I used C&W's a lot for international work when I was a civil servant. Copies of the code books were rare and people who had them would auction them off on retirement. Luckily you could remember the common ones; for example TUNHO meant do you agree? or I/we agree. I could type that in my sleep in the 60's and often did...

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Old 11-05-2018   #8
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And don't forget sending Cables...or Telexes
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Old 11-05-2018   #9
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If they were still using code names today, I guess the M9 might have been KAPUT for a while, until the sensors got fixed.
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Old 11-05-2018   #10
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And don't forget sending Cables...or Telexes
Hi,

If you knew what telegraphists got up to during the night you'd never forget and you'd shudder now and then...

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Old 11-05-2018   #11
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Hi,

If you knew what telegraphists got up to during the night you'd never forget and you'd shudder now and then...

Regards, David
Ooooo... maybe... naughty telegraphists and the predecessor of Snapchat - Snaptap.

This could be the missing chapter from the book "The Victorian Internet"

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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Old 11-05-2018   #12
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If they were still using code names today, I guess the M9 might have been KAPUT for a while, until the sensors got fixed.
I like that. And anything going to Leica USA could be listed as SNAFU.

PF
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Old 11-05-2018   #13
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I like the SHOOC finder very much (135). It sounds good. SVGOO is harder to pronounce and it suggests a Swedish overtone (90mm finder). SBOOI seems Asian and is indispensable on an LTM with a 50. The SBKOO sounds Japanese and suicidal which it isn’t as it’s a pretty good 21 finder. The SLOOZ, for the 28, sounds more louche...
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Old 11-05-2018   #14
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Old 11-05-2018   #15
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What was the Leitz cable address at Mortimer Street?
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Old 11-06-2018   #16
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What was the Leitz cable address at Mortimer Street?

The only place you'd find that would be on their headed notepaper. They don't even publish a 'phone number for Mortimer St in their 1930's catalogues.


I expect we'll get a lot of suggestions, though...


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Old 11-06-2018   #17
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If they were still using code names today, I guess the M9 might have been KAPUT for a while, until the sensors got fixed.
Rob, I nearly spat out my coffee when I read your post!
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Old 11-06-2018   #18
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microtome, london

was the telegraphic address of Leitz for their Mortimer Street office

I found a photographic on-line of a letter headed paper to do with the sale of the last M3 camera or some such - I'd struggle to find it again as I can't remember what combination of words I used to search for the information…

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Old 11-06-2018   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewmore View Post
microtome, london

was the telegraphic address of Leitz for their Mortimer Street office

I found a photographic on-line of a letter headed paper to do with the sale of the last M3 camera or some such - I'd struggle to find it again as I can't remember what combination of words I used to search for the information…
https://leicarumors.com/wp-content/u...e-on-eBay5.jpg
from: https://leicarumors.com/2018/06/01/t...r-595000.aspx/

See also this here:
http://www.ernst-leitz-wetzlar.de/ka...omes/index.htm
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Old 11-06-2018   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelwj View Post
There is some method in a sea of madness, for instance codes beginning with P are generally filters, R is mostly used for Reprovit copy stand equipment, and many early binoculars had a code starting with B.
The best ones however are the ones that sound something like what they were.

l find it all so enthralling
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Old 11-06-2018   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Hughes View Post
Firstly, it was best for telegrams as 5 unit codes counted as one word. And letters were simpler to transmit by hand in Morse.

Secondly, numbers are limited to a few thousand combinations (10x10x10x10x10) and letters mean 26x26x26x26x26.

Lastly, these codes were commonplace in the days of telegrams; f'instance Bentley's and C&W's.

I used C&W's a lot for international work when I was a civil servant. Copies of the code books were rare and people who had them would auction them off on retirement. Luckily you could remember the common ones; for example TUNHO meant do you agree? or I/we agree. I could type that in my sleep in the 60's and often did...

Regards, David
thanks David a very interesting insight
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Old 11-06-2018   #22
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Originally Posted by Rob-F View Post
If they were still using code names today, I guess the M9 might have been KAPUT for a while, until the sensors got fixed.
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Old 11-06-2018   #23
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I like that. And anything going to Leica USA could be listed as SNAFU.

PF
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Old 11-06-2018   #24
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great links thanks for sharing
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Old 11-07-2018   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewmore View Post
microtome, london

was the telegraphic address of Leitz for their Mortimer Street office

I found a photographic on-line of a letter headed paper to do with the sale of the last M3 camera or some such - I'd struggle to find it again as I can't remember what combination of words I used to search for the informationů

Regards

Andrew C. More
Excellent bit of research, it is all out there somewhere!
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