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MANFA, Make America Nineteen Fifties Again
Old 09-07-2018   #1
xayraa33
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MANFA, Make America Nineteen Fifties Again

I got to admit, some of those amateur holiday snap cameras had great bokeh 60 to 70 years ago.. and Kodachrome's bright colours age very well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B8Y1OVa96c
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Old 09-07-2018   #2
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Yeah, I have to admit, it was a great time if you were white.

Did you read any of the comments?

If you were trying to push a MAGA agenda, you have come to the wrong place.

Having said that, the shot with the three young ladies and the kayaks was simply outstanding.
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Old 09-07-2018   #3
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@RIch, I thought you were drastically over-reacting. Then I read some of the comments. Euch.

Kodachrome is nice, they did make good guitars and jeans but I'm glad my son is growing up in the present.
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Old 09-07-2018   #4
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I, for one, am glad we are not stuck in the 1950s!

However, I think the "golden age" for cameras was between the mid 1960s and early 1980s, when film was slow(er) and lenses were designed to do the best with the available film.

I think the real sweet spot was maybe 10-15 years ago, using the combination of 1970s glass and early 2000s film, which was at a peak and had a good selection.
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Old 09-07-2018   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Waldroup View Post
Yeah, I have to admit, it was a great time if you were white.

Did you read any of the comments?

If you were trying to push a MAGA agenda, you have come to the wrong place.

Having said that, the shot with the three young ladies and the kayaks was simply outstanding.
I am Canadian, In the USA I would not be considered " white".. if that means anything.

I got no MAGA agenda or MAGMA or LAVA agenda etc.

I just looked at the photos and noticed that some have great OOF areas and vivid colours and I thought like minded RFF members would enjoy seeing them.
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Old 09-07-2018   #6
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I will take the present and celebrate diversity. And I remember (somewhat) the 1950's being born in 1952. I loved hiding under the desk in first grade to practice for an atomic war.
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Old 09-07-2018   #7
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Many similar 1950's nostalgia pics on the Kodachrome thread.

Jim B.
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Old 09-07-2018   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xayraa33 View Post
I am Canadian, In the USA I would not be considered " white".. if that means anything.

I got no MAGA agenda or MAGMA or LAVA agenda etc.

I just looked at the photos and noticed that some have great OOF areas and vivid colours and I thought like minded RFF members would enjoy seeing them.
Then, I apologize for my rant. The photos were lovely to look at, but I still stand by what I said about that era.

It was a wonderful time if you were white. I was born in '54 and remember some of that time and especially heading into the early 1960's when there were still plenty of "Colored Only" restrooms and water fountains here in Texas.
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Old 09-07-2018   #9
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I think I went to high school with the guy with the hair. dmr is right it was really work to be a photographer then. Although, in 1962 I didn't think anything of shooting a roll of Kodachrome. Now I consider every shot.
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Old 09-07-2018   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Waldroup View Post
Then, I apologize for my rant. The photos were lovely to look at, but I still stand by what I said about that era.

It was a wonderful time if you were white. I was born in '54 and remember some of that time and especially heading into the early 1960's when there were still plenty of "Colored Only" restrooms and water fountains here in Texas.
I am visual, hence why I always gravitated to sketching, oil painting and of course photography, cameras, film development and wet darkroom print making.

I did not create the past and I am sure there was good and bad in every decade just like there is now in every place on this place we call earth.

Everyone it seems has turned into a self righteous social justice warrior at the drop of a hat. Even just showing innocent photos of the past has now got to turn into a black-hat vs white-hat slug-fest .

The social engineering manipulators have done a great job of divide and conquer. Few can actually see the forest for the trees.
No one has a sense of humour any more and everything is now a big deal.

I just enjoy looking at photographs, whether they were taken in now or the 1990s or the 19th century or the 1950s, simple as that .

The medium is the message .
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Old 09-07-2018   #11
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Nostalgia is a disease. Most of us are sufferers to some extent.

You can fight it or embrace it to suit your needs, psychological or political.

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Old 09-07-2018   #12
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Used Kodachrome throughout the ‘70s and ‘80s .
Mostly 64 ,occasionally 25 and if feeling adventurous 200
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Old 09-07-2018   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Markey View Post
Used Kodachrome throughout the ‘70s and ‘80s .
Mostly 64 ,occasionally 25 and if feeling adventurous 200
I am right there with you. I shot Kodachrome the same way and I remember when they produced the 200 and I was like, WOW, this is awesome. I only shot a few rolls of the 200, but it was really nice stuff.
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Old 09-07-2018   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Markey View Post
Used Kodachrome throughout the ‘70s and ‘80s .
Mostly 64 ,occasionally 25 and if feeling adventurous 200
I used Kodachrome 25 and 64 in the 1970s and even some 160 ASA Ektachrome.

I even used GAF 500 slide film in the 70s, but last time I checked those slides they have completely faded, unlike the Kodachromes.
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Old 09-07-2018   #15
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Very nice.

I gotta admit....they don't make nostalgia like they used to. :^)

And on that subject here is a superb video of Don Draper from "Madmen" talking about nostalgia and illustrating it perfectly with some of his own photos. (Seems they had nostalgia even back then in the 1950's - at least according to 2010 TV series)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suRDUFpsHus
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Old 09-07-2018   #16
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I preferred the 60's myself. Maybe because I was 7 in 1959! Shoot, the 60's are still here.....like wow, far out and right on brother.
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Old 09-07-2018   #17
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These are plastic, happy, monotone photos...family photos, curated and nostalgic, but not ideally living photography.

The comments are the most educative.
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Old 09-07-2018   #18
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This is deja vu, all over again.
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Old 09-07-2018   #19
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It still an interesting time regardless of the warts and all..

The 1950s lasted from 1946 to November 22 1963 in the USA, a tumultuous but yet an interesting time period, envied and embellish beyond reality by other nations in the passing time.

You can cherry pick anything that is considered "Bad" in any decade and for any nation but in the end it is always going to be an "opinion and a grab-bag" and like I mentioned before, it is always a case of a mix of good, bad and majority mundane-ness.

To me interesting photos transcend politics or even time-eras or slogans .
Spoofing a current popular abbreviation just makes it less serious and just makes it just a blip in a timeline that one should not get too worked up about, if they have eyes to see and a gut feeling that they are being played in the divide and conquer game.

I enjoy looking at images without putting too much of myself in them or getting too emotional, and they could be photos inside of one of my family photos albums or my collection of 1871 Sepia toned photo images of the Paris Commune or photos of London UK of the swinging groovy 1960s or images on our RFF gallery or on Flickr.
They are equally interesting images on many levels, regardless of what personal emotional baggage one wants to attach to them.

People have now forgotten to see humour in life and have forgotten to see a photo as a photo, which is not the same as reality.
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Old 09-07-2018   #20
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As someone born in 1970, I can't rightfully say I feel nostalgic for the '50s. But I do feel drawn to the things from that era, for sure. Most of my cameras are from then! That said, I would never want our world today to be like then. The times have changed for the better. We've come a long way.
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Old 09-07-2018   #21
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Quote:
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As someone born in 1970, I can't rightfully say I feel nostalgic for the '50s. But I do feel drawn to the things from that era, for sure. Most of my cameras are from then! That said, I would never want our world today to be like then. The times have changed for the better. We've come a long way.
Im 1970 model as well and sort of feel the same way. The crap has been going on forever they just modernize it. Its always the same old crap too. Think about it to much and it will make you ill.
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Old 09-07-2018   #22
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I was born in November `50.
The fifties were rather bleak in the UK.
The country was still suffering from the effects of the war and rationing of goods was still in place.
I still have a ration card some where.
My dad was always taking photographs during that period though ,on a Kodak Hawkette 2 which is sitting on the bookcase behind me now.
Holidays were always the Isle of Man ,which seemed very exotic to a young child.
My first pictures were taken in 1962 on a trip to Belgium using that same Hawkette No
2.
They were street shots same as I take now.
I was still using the camera at the end of the sixties .

I don`t recall having it at the first Isle of White festival in `69 (right after Woodstock ,Bob Dylan and the Band headlining) but did take it to the second in `70.
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Old 09-07-2018   #23
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That's appalling!
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Old 09-08-2018   #24
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These photos are mediocre at best. In addition, all the people shot in the photos were white. Whoever edited the clip pretended that America had no minority. I don't know why the OP wants to "promote" this clip.

There are much better photographs shot on Kodakchrome of the yesteryear online.
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Old 09-08-2018   #25
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That's appalling!

Keith, you always call it like you see it and I agree with you 100%.

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Old 09-08-2018   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philosli View Post
These photos are mediocre at best. In addition, all the people shot in the photos were white. Whoever edited the clip pretended that America had no minority. I don't know why the OP wants to "promote" this clip.

There are much better photographs shot on Kodakchrome of the yesteryear online.
Photos are photos, they can be enjoyable to watch regardless if the subjects appear to be white, black, brown, yellow or green or if no human beings are in them at all. They can be from any era or depicting any place.

Just recently I wondered about how come there are very few 19th century photographs from German states*/Germany online? (*Germany was formed in 1871)

One would think that technically advanced and a relatively wealthy place(s) on earth would have a myriad of photos to show, no different than Gt. Britain, America or France from the same time frame.

This is about most of all I could find:
http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/ph...e-92001-2.html

I am sure now someone will complain that these photos are "No Good" because they show no diversity.

Common sense has left the building in some people, simple joy has to be replaced with their mind concocted psychosis or else you are not part of the current group-think mantra, which ironically and sadly is all about stifling diversity.

Photography images are not about diversity or non diversity, it is always about the image , pleasant, non-pleasant, neutral, exciting, whimsical, humdrum, thought provoking or plain forgettable, it is all good and necessary and comes with the territory.

Folks should get a grip of themselves and take time to smell the roses.
Life is not all bad or sinister.
Learn to laugh once in a while, we will not get out of this world alive, so why be miserable?
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Old 09-08-2018   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xayraa33 View Post
Photos are photos, they can be enjoyable to watch regardless if the subjects appear to be white, black, brown, yellow or green or if no human beings are in them at all. They can be from any era or depicting any place.

Just recently I wondered about how come there are very few 19th century photographs from German states*/Germany online? (*Germany was formed in 1871)

One would think that technically advanced and a relatively wealthy place(s) on earth would have a myriad of photos to show, no different than Gt. Britain, America or France from the same time frame.

This is about most of all I could find:
http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/ph...e-92001-2.html

I am sure now someone will complain that these photos are "No Good" because they show no diversity.

Common sense has left the building in some people, simple joy has to be replaced with their mind concocted psychosis or else you are not part of the current group-think mantra, which ironically and sadly is all about stifling diversity.

Photography images are not about diversity or non diversity, it is always about the image , pleasant, non-pleasant, neutral, exciting, whimsical, humdrum, thought provoking or plain forgettable, it is all good and necessary and comes with the territory.

Folks should get a grip of themselves and take time to smell the roses.
Life is not all bad or sinister.
Learn to laugh once in a while, we will not get out of this world alive, so why be miserable?
Dude, you are the one who titled your post, Make America Nineteen Fifties Again.
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Old 09-08-2018   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xayraa33 View Post

Life is not all bad or sinister.
For some people constant conditioned by the constant repetition of the two minute hate it apparently is. You don’t even need to have been there to know more than those who were.
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Old 09-08-2018   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Waldroup View Post
Dude, you are the one who titled your post, Make America Nineteen Fifties Again.
I am sure that if I posted a link to the TV series " Happy Days" someone will complain and moan about it

The best way to defuse something other than not mentioning is to spoof it,or as the Brits say " taking the p*ss out it" .

Some it seems, have missed my point.

If I said "MANTA", Make America nineteen thirties again, or make America nineteen twenties again..would it make a difference?

Someone somewhere will get their knickers in a bunch regardless.

People tend to see what they want to see, that is the charm of exhibiting photographs and of photography in general.
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Old 09-08-2018   #30
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As European, I don't get it. Is there something controversial in "Make America Nineteen Fifties Again"?
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Old 09-08-2018   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Markey View Post
I was born in November `50.
The fifties were rather bleak in the UK.
The country was still suffering from the effects of the war and rationing of goods was still in place.
I still have a ration card some where.
My dad was always taking photographs during that period though ,on a Kodak Hawkette 2 which is sitting on the bookcase behind me now.
Holidays were always the Isle of Man ,which seemed very exotic to a young child.
My first pictures were taken in 1962 on a trip to Belgium using that same Hawkette No
2.
They were street shots same as I take now.
I was still using the camera at the end of the sixties .

I don`t recall having it at the first Isle of White festival in `69 (right after Woodstock ,Bob Dylan and the Band headlining) but did take it to the second in `70.
Butlins holiday camps were what most could afford for a holiday in the 1950s in the UK. Wages were very low and new camera gear was highly taxed there too.

Musician Graham Nash had a sad and poignant story about his working class dad liking photography and resorting to stealing a camera ..and the whole episode not ending well.

I always wanted to visit the Isle of Man, the motorcycle TT race would be interesting and so would seeing the area of the legendary Gef, the talking mongoose
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Old 09-08-2018   #32
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Thanks for posting a link to a video that is quite interesting! Having grown up in the 50s, it is always nice to see images from the past. Nostalgia is not a disease... ...memories are all we have and it gives me pleasure to occasionally see old photos as I remember my loved ones, family and friends. It is good for the soul and grounds me in the present.

The future is uncertain. And the end is always near... (from The Doors). We are who we are because of our past and how we experience life each moment in the present.

The poem by Walt Whitman that basically says we are who we are because of our past experiences was recently published in a CNN article. I must look it up again for the title because I was struck by a parallel article about neuroscience and how our brains are constantly building new synapses every moment we experience. The present confirms the past. Cool!

While I do not want to be young again, I would love to have a red and white 50s Corvette to enjoy even for a brief time!!!!
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Old 09-08-2018   #33
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A question:

Film, vintage cameras and gear... is that part of an unhealthy nostalgia, or something to eschew because it was from a time or place that has s negative connection?

IMHO, we must embrace the lessons and good things from the past as we move forward in our journey in life. I believe in the power of the individual to make a difference in the world for good. So let's just do it!
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Old 09-08-2018   #34
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Sometimes I do feel a sense of nostalgia with the optimist part of the 50s. Kodachrome, the style, classic vehicles the jet age and atomic age futurism.
As a 90s born, ain't been anywhere close but this very weekend my hometown celebrates a Rock n Roll festival and becomes a small retro bubble. The 50s in Spain were under a bleak authoritarian dictatorship, so nothing nostalgic about it.
In another way, lately I do feel late 90s-early 2000s pre great recession nostalgia quite often. Of course, as a different generation, got different points in time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmr View Post
I, for one, am glad we are not stuck in the 1950s!

However, I think the "golden age" for cameras was between the mid 1960s and early 1980s, when film was slow(er) and lenses were designed to do the best with the available film.

I think the real sweet spot was maybe 10-15 years ago, using the combination of 1970s glass and early 2000s film, which was at a peak and had a good selection.
Well, the cameras are still there and Ektachrome is coming back. Sometimes E6 does approach a quite "retro" look itself, not Kodachrome, but it does the effect as well. With a faster shutter speed or ND, it's back to ISO 64... I feel lucky having tried a few rolls of KR64 back on the tail end of it.

Early 1990-2000s film is still here in the form of consumer C41 film.
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Old 09-08-2018   #35
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Originally Posted by xayraa33 View Post
I am visual, hence why I always gravitated to sketching, oil painting and of course photography, cameras, film development and wet darkroom print making.

I did not create the past and I am sure there was good and bad in every decade just like there is now in every place on this place we call earth.

Everyone it seems has turned into a self righteous social justice warrior at the drop of a hat. Even just showing innocent photos of the past has now got to turn into a black-hat vs white-hat slug-fest .

The social engineering manipulators have done a great job of divide and conquer. Few can actually see the forest for the trees.
No one has a sense of humour any more and everything is now a big deal.

I just enjoy looking at photographs, whether they were taken in now or the 1990s or the 19th century or the 1950s, simple as that .

The medium is the message .
A very wise statement.

It seems we are no longer allowed to enjoy anything without first checking if it's endorsed by the watchdogs of societal acceptability. Maybe that's one of the reasons for the predominate mediocrity of almost everything produced today, photographically and otherwise.
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Old 09-08-2018   #36
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Yep Graham Nash was born here in Blackpool (as was John Mahoney … Frasier ) but his family moved back to Manchester.
I first went to the TT in `57.
Geoff Duke was the man to beat back then.
Always rode for Norton I seem to recall.
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Old 09-08-2018   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave lackey View Post
A question:

Film, vintage cameras and gear... is that part of an unhealthy nostalgia, or something to eschew because it was from a time or place that has s negative connection?

IMHO, we must embrace the lessons and good things from the past as we move forward in our journey in life. I believe in the power of the individual to make a difference in the world for good. So let's just do it!
Great question, Dave !

This is or was a rangefinder camera forum, a type of film camera that fell out of favour in around 1959.. when the SLR camera started to be the latest and the greatest, no different than the current hoopla on FF mirrorless cameras.

This very forum has its founding roots in nostalgia.
There is good and bad in any time period.

Saying one decade in one huge land mass was all bad is as ridiculous as saying everyone at a particular moment in time is either very happy, or very sad, which is incorrect.

Human beings of all classes, races, ages, nationalities, religions or sexes are mercurial in their mood and there is nothing fixed.

Most human beings of any classification, if is there is actually such a thing as a classification of human beings are basically decent and well meaning creatures who want to do good for themselves and for their kin and for others.

For the most part, that has been my life experience, which has been a very positive one.
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Old 09-08-2018   #38
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The 50s in Spain were under a bleak authoritatian dictatorship, so nothing nostalgic about it.
I was travelling through Spain when that bleak period ended.
I remember being woken up at gunpoint one night on the road to Salamanca by the Guardia Civil.
Bleak times indeed.
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Old 09-08-2018   #39
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Yep Graham Nash was born here in Blackpool (as was John Mahoney … Frasier ) but his family moved back to Manchester.
I first went to the TT in `57.
Geoff Duke was the man to beat back then.
Always rode for Norton I seem to recall.
Yes, The famous Norton Manx !

That was the machine to beat, the Gilera Saturno came close in the early 1950s but could not sustain it in the long haul.

The UK has produced some great Musicians/Singers that is for sure.

I seen the live Paul McCartney ( really Bill Sheppard playing the part of PM) podcast concert from NY last night here in Canada.

Amazing !! the guy has just turned 81 or is turning 81 on Sunday and gave a rousing performance, physically tiring enough even for a 31 year old singer/musician, great stuff !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QGxFpSb6Sc
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Old 09-08-2018   #40
charjohncarter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xayraa33 View Post
Great question, Dave !

This is or was a rangefinder camera forum, a type of film camera that fell out of favour in around 1959.. when the SLR camera started to be the latest and the greatest, no different than the current hoopla on FF mirrorless cameras.

This very forum has its founding roots in nostalgia.
There is good and bad in any time period.

Saying one decade in one huge land mass was all bad is as ridiculous as saying everyone at a particular moment in time is either very happy, or very sad, which is incorrect.

Human beings of all classes, races, ages, nationalities, religions or sexes are mercurial in their mood and there is nothing fixed.

Most human beings of any classification, if is there is actually such a thing as a classification of human beings are basically decent and well meaning creatures who want to do good for themselves and for their kin and for others.

For the most part, that has been my life experience, which has been a very positive one.
Very good xray, I've basically been happy all my life including the 50s. I lived in a country for three years that was ruled by a military dictator (a good one), but guns were everywhere (and they used them). It was a peaceful time (if you behaved) and the best three years I've had. I even was able to photograph the military dictator and his guards didn't jump me:

Kodachrome by John Carter, on Flickr
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