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Old 12-10-2018   #121
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Originally Posted by Shab View Post


If I should take only a camera with one lens, it would be a X100 camera. And sometimes I think I would be a better photographer if I had only this little/great camera...
brilliant. there is a clear feeling of space and time in the kid´s life on this image
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Old 12-10-2018   #122
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Hello Dave,
Well to put it quite Simply, the Camera either works for You or Does Not...
To put it simply, I agree with you pretty much across the board. But to get into specifics...

For my part, I've made use of others' suggestions, fiddled about and found a range of settings which suited me, and have more or less left it like that, shooting without much further tweaking. It is indeed purely subjective, its what I like, what suits me. And if someone can't find what suits them in a camera's feature-set, or feels obliged to get lost in complexity, then the camera 'won't work' for them. Look elsewhere.

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Not sure what you mean by "nobody wanted the upgrade festures & capabilities"
I was quoting recent remarks. THAT one referred to: //It seems every camera upgrade has a little better sensor and another gadzillon options added to the menu. Based on most of the postings on this forum nobody really wanted them.// ... which in retrospect isn't exactly recent .. its the last remark in May, before this week's resurgence. What this remark illustrates is that people seem to like the features THEY want but not the others, without realizing that the options aren't there so you can use them all, but so you can use the ones which make the camera work for you. So we're back to "its subjective". As some wag has said "If it can't be turned off, its a bug, not a feature"... and thus we have options, options, options. We learn the possibilities, choose our feature-set, and leave it at that.

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Silly and Pure fantasy to say: a Rollei 35 digital would give fuji a run for it's money... who's to say what it's capabilities would be, what ad ons or options it would have
Oh my, yes, I do agree. I suspect the poster meant "a simple compact camera with a very fine lens", but in digital, the simple is not actually simple at all. With a film camera, given a decent lens and some basic competence with exposure, we can choose the film and process that suits us; these are all camera-independent. In a digicam, behind that lens is a sensor, and software, and lots of very complex and specific tuning. Digital needs options for color and latitude and grain and sensitivity &etc &etc. And if you want to do that right, our digi-Rollei35 is going to be a solid compact camera with a very fine lens with simple default functions, and lots and lots of options so we can tune it to work just as we want.. kinda like an X100(x).

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I for one love the Acros simulation / 24 megapixel Fine, though I was also satisfied with 16 ... I also do very little PP in B&W ... another plus
Well now, there you go. You like a particular BW rendition, you learn to use it, to make it work for your personality. Someone else likes Velvia, or whatnot. And we're back to needing options to substitute for film choices.

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Granted the shutter button is a tad light but not flimsy when I shoot
I still stand by my thoughts ... for 1k it's a Fantastic camera and Lots of keepers
It's purely subjective as your thoughts re: Fuji X100F
I have no thoughts at all on the X100F, and defer to yours I shoot the X100, and have never seen nor touched an F model. (To update another thread, my X100 is slightly waterlogged, but surprisingly enough seems to have recovered and continues to work. For now.)

I respect your thoughts because you express yourself well in this forum, thoughtfully and intelligently and respectfully; I respect your photography because you consistently show us excellent work -- and if I might say, I see your work as consistently better than mine own.

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Old 12-10-2018   #123
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In some respects this complaint about camera complexity is the story of my life. I own several cameras and every damn one is different, often with confusing and non instinctive menu placement of items and even naming of some items in those menus which quite often uses different names to describe the same function. So every digital camera I have had has started as a struggle. And sometimes ended as one.

I try to cut though a lot of the crud by always using each camera in the simplest possible ways for my style of shooting - always shoot RAW / JPG in tandem if that is an option otherwise RAW alone for best image quality, almost always use aperture priority unless I want to shoot quickly in simple lighting situations then shoot program if that suits me, always set the camera to auto ISO with upper and lower limits set by myself, always shoot with the focus point set on the single middle focus point and almost always use centre weighted average metering unless the lighting is really problematic. Some of these (like the last one) I use because they are what I am comfortable with from film camera days. Others because they are a good compromise which usually gets results and also because they require some exercise of skill by me or because I just do not trust cameras to get it right. But also it means I do not need to fritz around with menus much. Unless I accidentally bump a button and change something I did not intend to - then all bets are off.

BTW there are some other grounds for complaint. I was surprised at how frequently cameras have funny glitches in their firmware. My present Panasonic GX 7 is a case in point. A problem I have experienced and still do - one that a lot of people have judging by the many threads on it and complaints on the internet, is that the focus point can meander around the screen for no apparent reason - ie even though I have ostensibly "locked it down". This is not caused by bumping a button and causes me to lose shots because I am expecting the focus point to be in one location when in fact it has moved of its own accord and I have not noticed.

This is not caused by having LCD "swipe" control activated and then bumping the screen. It is a firmware glitch. The responses by the Panasonic folk answering these complaints on the official bulletin board would be priceless if they were not so gormless, useless and repetitive. Their responses to every one of these thousands of complaints (over and over and over again to every complainant ) is tantamount to accusing the user of being an idiot who has set the camera up wrongly or is using it wrongly. (Which of course begs the question that if this were true and thousands of users all make the same dumb mistake then why would Panasonic not change the firmware to make it easier for the problem to be avoided by their stupid user base- i.e. like me and other folks like me). But of course the problem is not user error, it is obviously poorly written code that has not been rectified in testing.

Yet Panasonic online "technicians" keep asking users the equivalent of the question asked relentlessly in the BBC comedy program "The I.T. Crowd" whenever someone rings them up for help and the I.T. people want to fob them off - "Have you tried turning it off and on again" then for all intents and purposes ending further communication. (Love that comedy).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn2FB1P_Mn8

This is not a Panasonic rant as such (I quite like their cameras) just an anecdote about the realities of using modern cameras with too complex software that has perhaps been rushed to meet a deadline and never properly tested. Just to make our lives a teensy bit more annoying. In short we can mediate it by choosing to use the cameras more simply but that is not by any means the end of the story - the machines always get their revenge somehow it seems.
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Old 12-10-2018   #124
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Originally Posted by Ko.Fe. View Post
I was able to get my hands on X100F in the store yesterday. Just as with X Pro 2, here is strange feel by looking into OVF. Different from classic film cameras OVFs.

I was trying to set this thing for split image focus, have it enabled in the menu, but it kept on giving me green boxes. I set another switch to manual and still green boxes.
Split image focus is for EVF or ERF modes. If you were just using the OVF it does not work there. Flip the front lever to the right to put the camera in EVF mode or push it to the left to put the camera in ERF mode which is the OVF with the small EVF box in the side to confirm focus. Split image can be used in either mode.

The trick with the hyrbrid rangefinder cameras is they have multiple personalities depending upon which viewfinder mode you are using. Best way to learn them (IMO) is to stick with one at first and figure that all out before venturing on. If the camera does something one doesn't like then ask on a forum. For many things it can be tweaked with the settings in the camera.

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Old 12-10-2018   #125
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Originally Posted by colker View Post
between Leica digital w/ their simple menu and fujis at a more affordable price there sure is space for another camera. it´s all i am saying and these companies are listening to us.
I'd say the Leica menu is sparse, but not simple. The camera's menus are filled with idiosyncrasies. Way to easy to change a function and then have the camera change the setting back because you didn't exit the menu the way to camera wants you to. Or settings kind of buried in odd places due to Leica not wanting to make the top level menu any bigger. Or buttons that are inconsistent in their use. For example the Info button is used like an 'OK' sometimes, but not always.

Yeah, the Fuji has loads of options. But really, once setup there is no need to jump into the menus much. I can change what I want by direct access buttons I setup.

Ugly menu design goes to either Olympus or Sony IME.....

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Old 12-10-2018   #126
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Originally Posted by peterm1 View Post
In some respects this complaint about camera complexity is the story of my life. I own several cameras and every damn one is different, often with confusing and non instinctive menu placement of items and even naming of some items in those menus which quite often uses different names to describe the same function. So every digital camera I have had has started as a struggle. And sometimes ended as one.

I try to cut though a lot of the crud by always using each camera in the simplest possible ways for my style of shooting - always shoot RAW / JPG in tandem if that is an option otherwise RAW alone for best image quality, almost always use aperture priority unless I want to shoot quickly in simple lighting situations then shoot program if that suits me, always set the camera to auto ISO with upper and lower limits set by myself, always shoot with the focus point set on the single middle focus point and almost always use centre weighted average metering unless the lighting is really problematic. Some of these (like the last one) I use because they are what I am comfortable with from film camera days. Others because they are a good compromise which usually gets results and also because they require some exercise of skill by me or because I just do not trust cameras to get it right. But also it means I do not need to fritz around with menus much. Unless I accidentally bump a button and change something I did not intend to - then all bets are off.

BTW there are some other grounds for complaint. I was surprised at how frequently cameras have funny glitches in their firmware. My present Panasonic GX 7 is a case in point. A problem I have experienced and still do - one that a lot of people have judging by the many threads on it and complaints on the internet, is that the focus point can meander around the screen for no apparent reason - ie even though I have ostensibly "locked it down". This is not caused by bumping a button and causes me to lose shots because I am expecting the focus point to be in one location when in fact it has moved of its own accord and I have not noticed.

This is not caused by having LCD "swipe" control activated and then bumping the screen. It is a firmware glitch. The responses by the Panasonic folk answering these complaints on the official bulletin board would be priceless if they were not so gormless, useless and repetitive. Their responses to every one of these thousands of complaints (over and over and over again to every complainant ) is tantamount to accusing the user of being an idiot who has set the camera up wrongly or is using it wrongly. (Which of course begs the question that if this were true and thousands of users all make the same dumb mistake then why would Panasonic not change the firmware to make it easier for the problem to be avoided by their stupid user base- i.e. like me and other folks like me). But of course the problem is not user error, it is obviously poorly written code that has not been rectified in testing.

Yet Panasonic online "technicians" keep asking users the equivalent of the question asked relentlessly in the BBC comedy program "The I.T. Crowd" whenever someone rings them up for help and the I.T. people want to fob them off - "Have you tried turning it off and on again" then for all intents and purposes ending further communication. (Love that comedy).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn2FB1P_Mn8

This is not a Panasonic rant as such (I quite like their cameras) just an anecdote about the realities of using modern cameras with too complex software that has perhaps been rushed to meet a deadline and never properly tested. Just to make our lives a teensy bit more annoying. In short we can mediate it by choosing to use the cameras more simply but that is not by any means the end of the story - the machines always get their revenge somehow it seems.
I don´t even use auto iso.. I set each iso like i was using film on nikon d700 and I never use autofocus. Otoh i trust program exposure and concentrate on focusing if i am shooting fast. If on old lenses it´s aperture priority. I just use it as i would shoot a film camera.
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Old 12-10-2018   #127
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I'm a bit surprised that Fuji hasn't come out with a wide(r) angle version of the X100. Id like a 28mm or (maybe even better) 25mm equivalent. It can be just like X100, only wider. I don't need the fancy improvements of the later models.
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Old 12-10-2018   #128
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Originally Posted by colker View Post
I don´t even use auto iso.. i set each iso like i was using film on nikon d700 and I never use autofocus. Otoh i trust program exposure and concentrate on focusing if i am shooting fast. If on old lenses it´s aperture priority. I just use it as i would shoot a film camera.
I often but do not always use MF lenses - usually reserving AF for those situations where I feel events will be too fast moving. But in general my point is still the same - keep your settings as simple and as customized for your own needs as possible, and take control rather than letting the camera control you - except where it is convenient and to the extent needed to do so. Then stick to those settings.
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Old 12-10-2018   #129
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What a strange thread. If the x100f menu is anything like the xpro2, it's really about as simple as you want to make it. Aperture is on the lens, shutter speed and ISO dials on top. Done! Anything else is just gravy IF one chooses to explore a little into the camera. For Fuji, the jpg settings are well worth exploring imho because you can nail a shot with no PP. I think about my xpro2 the same way I think about my film M's when shooting. I love using film and the magic of developing, but the xpro2 has an advantage of instantly changing ISO and choosing between the 7 "film" sims I have customized.
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Old 12-11-2018   #130
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I can't think of any recent fixed lens cameras that offer multiple focal lens versions of the same camera. It must not make good business sense to OEMs. 35mm seems a sensible compromise. Of course there are the two extenders, but I know that's not the same as a native lens.

Personally, I'd rather see a monochrome version of the current model. That seems simple enough.

John
Fabricating a monochrome sensor sure seems way more complicated than releasing another focal length 100. Also.. BW rangefinder is a niche within a niche.
Having said that i would love to see an official monochrome Fuji X. (I can buy a converted sensor at a premium price... but that´s a different story).
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Old 12-11-2018   #131
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Originally Posted by Rob-F View Post
I'm a bit surprised that Fuji hasn't come out with a wide(r) angle version of the X100. Id like a 28mm or (maybe even better) 25mm equivalent. It can be just like X100, only wider. I don't need the fancy improvements of the later models.
I call for a "50mm" equivalent. It´s a classic RF focal length.
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Old 12-11-2018   #132
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Originally Posted by johnwolf View Post
I can't think of any recent fixed lens cameras that offer multiple focal lens versions of the same camera. It must not make good business sense to OEMs. 35mm seems a sensible compromise. Of course there are the two extenders, but I know that's not the same as a native lens.

Personally, I'd rather see a monochrome version of the current model. That seems simple enough.

John
Hmm. It’s not like the concept is untried — A couple of film cameras come to mind (Nikon 35Ti and 28Ti, which fits the high-end consumer compact market segment of the X100 series; also the Fuji GA645 and GA645W, in the pro segment) — but nothing recent, nothing I recall in the digital realm.

Simple, sure, but I wouldn’t hold my breath for a monochrome version.
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Old 12-11-2018   #133
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Hmm. It’s not like the concept is untried — A couple of film cameras come to mind (Nikon 35Ti and 28Ti, which fits the high-end consumer compact market segment of the X100 series; also the Fuji GA645 and GA645W, in the pro segment) — but nothing recent, nothing I recall in the digital realm.

Simple, sure, but I wouldn’t hold my breath for a monochrome version.
You can buy/order a custom tweaked 100 monochrome and it´s not cheap. The files are worth it.
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Old 12-11-2018   #134
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Originally Posted by colker View Post
...and these companies are listening to us.
No. They are not.

There is only one brand that sells digital cameras with a mechanical coincidence rangefinder.

FUJIFILM sells two digital cameras with reverse Galilean optical finders (link).

I am unaware of any other digital cameras where manual focusing is a design priority. By manual focusing I mean turning a lens collar (mechanical or digital) to set focus.

I am unaware of any other digital cameras that that let photographers compose while viewing outside of the frame lines.

While it is possible to focus manually with many digital cameras, all but two brands assume customers only care about AF. The others only support visual inspection via EVF magnification or various implementations of focus peaking. All their product development is AF centric.

The D1H appeared in 2001 and offered the D100 a year later. In the 16-17 years that followed there have been only Leica, Epson and FUJIFILM have offered the RF experience for digital photographers.

If the other companies were listening to us, how come our MF options are so limited?
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Old 12-11-2018   #135
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If the other companies were listening to us, how come our MF options are so limited?
They have listened and heard that not that many people are asking for them.
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Old 12-11-2018   #136
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Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post
No. They are not.

There is only one brand that sells digital cameras with a mechanical coincidence rangefinder.

FUJIFILM sells two digital cameras with reverse Galilean optical finders (link).

I am unaware of any other digital cameras where manual focusing is a design priority. By manual focusing I mean turning a lens collar (mechanical or digital) to set focus.

I am unaware of any other digital cameras that that let photographers compose while viewing outside of the frame lines.

While it is possible to focus manually with many digital cameras, all but two brands assume customers only care about AF. The others only support visual inspection via EVF magnification or various implementations of focus peaking. All their product development is AF centric.

The D1H appeared in 2001 and offered the D100 a year later. In the 16-17 years that followed there have been only Leica, Epson and FUJIFILM have offered the RF experience for digital photographers.

If the other companies were listening to us, how come our MF options are so limited?
Oh Yes... they are:

Developments on the Fuji 100 line followed wishes from users. This is well known. The complexity which was blamed by the OP may have resulted from Fuji trying to appease everybody.
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Old 12-11-2018   #137
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Originally Posted by Rob-F View Post
I'm a bit surprised that Fuji hasn't come out with a wide(r) angle version of the X100. Id like a 28mm or (maybe even better) 25mm equivalent. It can be just like X100, only wider. I don't need the fancy improvements of the later models.
The Fuji XF10?
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Old 12-11-2018   #138
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Originally Posted by johnwolf View Post
I can't think of any recent fixed lens cameras that offer multiple focal lens versions of the same camera. It must not make good business sense to OEMs. 35mm seems a sensible compromise. Of course there are the two extenders, but I know that's not the same as a native lens.
Sigma has been doing this for years with their DP series cameras. They currently offer 4 fixed focal length cameras of 21,28,50 and 75mm effective focal lengths.

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Old 12-11-2018   #139
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You can buy/order a custom tweaked 100 monochrome and it´s not cheap. The files are worth it.
Do you have one?

I bought a replacement X100 CMOS sensor off ebay and one of these days am going to pull the glass off the sensor and remove the CFA.

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Old 12-11-2018   #140
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Can someone say what a good condition Black Premium Edition x100 would sell for please. I realize it is pretty old now. There is one available for about 350. Is that a good price? Too low? I've seen the regular models for more, so I wonder. Don't want to get ripped off buying long distance.

It looks near new. Thought to ask if there is any dust on the sensor. Were they prone to dust? Anything else?

Thanks. Don't mean to change the subject too much.
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Old 12-11-2018   #141
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If it is in good shape that isn't a bad price. The main issue to watch out for on the original x100s is the sticky aperture blade problem. The blades don't stop down consistently and you will get overexposure. Have the seller set the lens to f5.6 or f8 and take 10 or 20 of the exact same shot in a row outside (single shot mode, not motor drive) and if they all aren't the same exposure the camera probably has sticky aperture blades. You can also see this by watching the camera stop down using the DOF preview function if you set the camera to f8 or f11. Put it in/out of DOF preview a bunch of times in a row and if the opening isn't consistent every time the camera has the problem.

It took 3 tries for me to get a good used x100. Once from a seller here (who refunded the purchase), the second was for KEH and then they exchanged it for another that was fine.

You can see it in this video: https://flic.kr/p/M7pe4s

Shawn
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Old 12-11-2018   #142
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Do you have one?

I bought a replacement X100 CMOS sensor off ebay and one of these days am going to pull the glass off the sensor and remove the CFA.

Shawn
No I don´t..

and i want to know more about your experiment. Always wondered what exactly that custom shop is doing to the sensor. They say on their copy that converting xtrans is harder than other sensors.
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Old 12-11-2018   #143
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If it is in good shape that isn't a bad price. The main issue to watch out for on the original x100s is the sticky aperture blade problem. The blades don't stop down consistently and you will get overexposure. Have the seller set the lens to f5.6 or f8 and take 10 or 20 of the exact same shot in a row outside (single shot mode, not motor drive) and if they all aren't the same exposure the camera probably has sticky aperture blades. You can also see this by watching the camera stop down using the DOF preview function if you set the camera to f8 or f11. Put it in/out of DOF preview a bunch of times in a row and if the opening isn't consistent every time the camera has the problem.

It took 3 tries for me to get a good used x100. Once from a seller here (who refunded the purchase), the second was for KEH and then they exchanged it for another that was fine.

You can see it in this video: https://flic.kr/p/M7pe4s

Shawn
Ok, Shawn. Thanks for this.
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Old 12-12-2018   #144
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They have listened and heard that not that many people are asking for them.
Exactly!


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Old 12-12-2018   #145
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Originally Posted by Tati View Post
...
It looks near new. Thought to ask if there is any dust on the sensor. Were they prone to dust? Anything else?

...
I never had a sensor dust problem with my X100 or X-100T. I carried/carry both daily.

The issue I had with the original X100 was color banding artifacts (raw files) above ISO 640. I read this banding was camera dependent. My X-100 was from the first batch released in the US. The banding may have been addressed by the time the special edition was released. The X-100 replaced a D200 body which had much lower overall raw file IQ above ISO 640. So, in low light I rendered monochrome images with both cameras.

The other X-100 problem is the AF is slow and prone to locking on higher contrast objects near the intended focus object. The latter can be minimized by experimenting with some of the AF menu functions.

My X-100 did not have sticky aperture blades.
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Old 12-12-2018   #146
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Originally Posted by johnwolf View Post
I can't think of any recent fixed lens cameras that offer multiple focal lens versions of the same camera.

Sigma's DP series offers multiple focal lengths and have for many many years.
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Old 12-12-2018   #147
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Originally Posted by colker View Post
You can buy/order a custom tweaked 100 monochrome and it´s not cheap. The files are worth it.
Well now... THAT's interesting. Granted, $2600 is cheaper than a Leica Monochrom.

https://www.maxmax.com/maincamerapag...uji-monochrome
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Old 12-12-2018   #148
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Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post
I never had a sensor dust problem with my X100 or X-100T. I carried/carry both daily.

The issue I had with the original X100 was color banding artifacts (raw files) above ISO 640. I read this banding was camera dependent. My X-100 was from the first batch released in the US. The banding may have been addressed by the time the special edition was released. The X-100 replaced a D200 body which had much lower overall raw file IQ above ISO 640. So, in low light I rendered monochrome images with both cameras.

The other X-100 problem is the AF is slow and prone to locking on higher contrast objects near the intended focus object. The latter can be minimized by experimenting with some of the AF menu functions.

My X-100 did not have sticky aperture blades.
You had these problems w/ the T also?
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Old 12-12-2018   #149
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My original X100 had a very loose exposure compensation dial and then a sticky shutter which was replaced and then was stuck on 1/4000s. My dealer demanded a late serial number camera replacement. That was readily accepted, came quickly and has been great.

We can forget how exciting the anticipation of this camera was and how its arrival exceeeded the hype. Fuji did a brilliant job and remained responsive to photogrpahers’ requests for improvements. Leica have learnt something from them I suspect.
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Old 12-13-2018   #150
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Originally Posted by colker View Post
You had these problems w/ the T also?
No.

The X-100T has fast, dependable AF. Using the electronic rangefinder mode in OVF means you can confirm the actual focus object at a glance. I use focus peaking for that ER display. The EVF and OVF have 49 total focus points and the center 3 × 3 matrix are phase-detection points. The in-camera CPU is much faster. I use multi-point AF selection when DOF is wide. For subjects in motion the X-100T uses predictive focus tracking. Even fly-by-wire lens collar MF is a practical (well, much less annoying anyway) option.

I use raw. For color ISO 1600 is works well for color when exposure is optimized. I never go higher than 1600. I just push the raw file brightness in post-production. B&W rendering works well at higher levels of underexposure (~ISO 3200).

I have never seen banding with my X-100T.
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Old 02-03-2019   #151
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Originally Posted by Keith View Post
It was recommended highly by several people here when I asked for a quality fixed lens daily carry camera on behalf of a friend and justifiably so ... it has a great reputation for excellent IQ and performance.

My friend went ahead and bought one a week or two ago and visited me today and bought the little Fuji with her so I had a chance to play with it. I had an original X100 and was impressed with it's simplicity but I see a lot has happened to the X100 since then. Nothing simple about this camera and also very little about it that seemed intuitive to me. Congratulations Fuji because based on popularity the camera is a winner but I think you have given it a lot of DSLR style complication that it really didn't need.

Apologies in advance to happy X100F owners but this was my overpowering impression.

I have shot with Leica M cameras for 10+ years and I have to agree - the X100F is a complex camera compared to the M-P 240, let alone any of the film based M cameras.



I have learned to use the essential functions on the X100F and bypass the complexities. I still get lost in the endless menu options at times, which slows me down and can be a little frustrating.



In my brief (six weeks so far) experience with the X100F, I have come to be of the opinion that the key to using and enjoying this little gem of a camera is to stick to the basics.
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Old 03-02-2019   #152
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Originally Posted by noisycheese View Post
I have shot with Leica M cameras for 10+ years and I have to agree - the X100F is a complex camera compared to the M-P 240, let alone any of the film based M cameras.



I have learned to use the essential functions on the X100F and bypass the complexities. I still get lost in the endless menu options at times, which slows me down and can be a little frustrating.



In my brief (six weeks so far) experience with the X100F, I have come to be of the opinion that the key to using and enjoying this little gem of a camera is to stick to the basics.
I'll keep your last statement in mind when my X100F arrives next week and try not to become overwhelmed. The KISS principle always works.

I also used Leica M film cameras for over a decade, and additionally the Epson R-D1, which I recall as uncomplicated.
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Old 03-03-2019   #153
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I have to vent my opinion here. I love the X100F but the raw files are impossible to edit into a natural nice greyscale in ACR and Ps. It is so sad because I bought it mainly for bw. Somehow the raw files gives me raw files with the middle tones to dark.. it is impossible to fix.. So I am back to using my trusty D3200 for black and white, which is just amazing for bw.
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Old 03-04-2019   #154
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Do you have the DR200 or DR400 turned on? That will drop exposure by 1 or 2 stops. Adobe should compensate for that though.

Also, try shooting Raw+JPEG using the Acros setting for JPEG. It does a very nice job.

Shawn
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Old 03-04-2019   #155
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Originally Posted by Danlo View Post
I have to vent my opinion here. I love the X100F but the raw files are impossible to edit into a natural nice greyscale in ACR and Ps. It is so sad because I bought it mainly for bw. Somehow the raw files gives me raw files with the middle tones to dark.. it is impossible to fix.. So I am back to using my trusty D3200 for black and white, which is just amazing for bw.
Are the middle tones just too dark? That sounds like under exposure. I went from Nikon to Fuji, and the Nikon wipes the floor with the Fuji in metering.
Or are they too compressed? So much so that curves can’t fix it? Curves can usually fix all these issues if you understand how they work (not saying you don’t, im just surprised you can’t get what you want). I’m a bit confused, it sounds like you want a neutral contrast black and white, but it’s too dark? Do you mean too contrasty? Do you have examples?
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Old 03-04-2019   #156
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Let's see some examples.
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Old 03-04-2019   #157
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Most of the people who buy these cameras do so after reading reviewers who tell them that better and newer features equate to a better and newer camera which equates to the buyer being a better and newer photographer. Those same people who buy the cameras based on tech reviews will never use the camera's features and will end up with photos that look very much like the photos they take with their iPhones. But I am grateful for the uncritical consumer with spending cash. They are the ones -- not photographers -- who keep the industry going.
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Old 03-05-2019   #158
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I discovered a photographer's site whose B&W shots I thought were quite good. He generously lists the settings used in his X100F.

Fuji X100F: My Go-To ACROS Settings:
http://www.thebroketographers.com/bl...tings?rq=x100f

Fuji X100F: More ACROS Settings for Street Photography:
http://www.thebroketographers.com/bl...raphy?rq=x100f
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Old 03-05-2019   #159
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Originally Posted by TheBrightline View Post
I discovered a photographer's site whose B&W shots I thought were quite good. He generously lists the settings used in his X100F.
...
I must say I'm impressed and a bit surprised by those SOC JPEGs using Acros simulation and these settings. Thanks for the links.
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Old 03-06-2019   #160
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I know very well how to work with curves in Photoshop, been using Photoshop in my work for about 14 years now . So, the problem is the sensor, or how the software interprets the raw files.. I have a full frame D600 as well and that 24mp sensor is even worse, but with the D600 it is the highlights that so extremely flat - its like there is no way to make the highlights "pop" without blowing them out - also the blacks are weirdly compressed so it is impossible to lift them without making it look weird. It seems to me that the older the sensor, with around 11-12 steps of DR (dxomark), the better they work for BW. My favorite sensor ever for BW was the 12mp sensor in Nikon D300, D5000 asf. Sadly my D5000 broke down a few years ago I should add that the sensor in X100F is nowhere near the worst out there, but it is difficult to work with when natural film-like look in BW is what you are after.
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