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SLRs - the unRF For those of you who must talk about SLRs, if only to confirm they are not RF.

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Old 03-15-2018   #81
Richard G
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That’s cool too. Amazing collection you’ve amassed.

And thanks Joe. It’s been a lot of fun.
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Old 03-18-2018   #82
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My Hasselblad kit arrived last week. I hadn't been waiting four decades to make the plunge, just one, but I'm glad I made the leap and wish I'd done so earlier. I will add my thoughts to the thread now, but I'm sure my thoughts towards it will evolve with use.

I got a kit with a 500c/m, 50mm CF FLE and 180mm CF and two backs. Back swapping is immediately useful. My almost 7 year old daughter wants her own back now so she can shoot colour film - she doesn't like black and white (yet!). I find it relaxing to get a fixed 12 shots, no trying to squeeze 37 or 38 shots out of the roll. It takes away a small stress which is nice.

The 50 FLE is big, the 180 is bigger. Holding the camera in my left hand (as illustrated), index finger on the shutter with the 50 FLE mounted, the camera is almost well balanced, it feels comfortable, but it also feels like it wants to tip forward. The 180 is a lot of weight hanging a long way out, and not comfortable for very long - It won't be a "walk around lens" due to the lack of balance, even through it wouldn't be due to the focal length anyway. Focus on both lenses requires big turns, but it's not all that slow, the 50 has the additional FLE adjustment which has a few distance settings (0.5-0.8; 0.8-1.2; 1.2-4; 4-infinity) which are supposed to be set before focusing. It adds another thing to do, but I don't find it a hassle.

The 50 and 180 make a great pair, but I think an 80 will be in my future as a general purpose around the house lens, the extra stop and lower weight will be beneficial. Sharing B60 filter/caps is great, I'll need to find a few B60 filters but they seem expensive - then again they're similar to Leica filter prices and I only need one set to go from the 38mm SWC to 250mm (excluding the 40 FLE) is nice. Using Leica there is always the dream of a standard 39mm filter set, but it never really worked out like that - I had 39mm, 48mm, S7 and on and on...

I have the standard Hasselblad screen, and it's plenty bright enough. It gets quite dark when it's dark, but by then I'd be shooting at ISO400, 1/15th, f/4 anyway. It's brighter than the Rolleiflex 2.8C screen I used. I'm in no rush to upgrade the screen.

I keep forgetting about the dark slide and get the shot all framed and focused and then go to take the shot and the dark slide stops me. I then have to get the dark slide out of the way... it's more of a pain handheld because the camera moves, on a tripod it's just an annoyance. I'm not sure what everyone else does, but I think it will be easiest to but the dark slide in a holder and only put it back when removing the back. I'm sure I'll lose it soon and should get a spare and a holder.

I use RRS clamps on my tripod(s) but with the plate attached it is uncomfortable to hold and doesn't sit down very well and I have to remove the plate to attach my tabletop tripod. Has anyone got any experience with the Clearsight clamp?

What do people use for bags? I currently use a Dome F6, which is fine when I'm holding the camera, but it just doesn't fit the camera with the 50mm attached. It might work better with the 80mm, but it'd be nice to comfortably hold the 50 attached.

I think I'll find the bubble level useful, for some reason I find it very difficult to level the camera through a waist level finder. A wide strap will also be on the cards, even though I have a distain for straps, I think it will be very useful. Any recommendations? Something in a tan leather would look great I think!

Next step, I need a scanner... in the meantime I'll enjoy my negatives with an iPhone app.

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Old 05-17-2018   #83
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Great thread Richard and all, a good read indeed.
I am shooting almost exclusively with my M2s and I donīt have much time to add new system but I did try different MF camera in the past few years and I might give a 500 c/m a try one day...

Michael, looking forward to see more!

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Old 07-27-2018   #84
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Thanks Giulio. I’ve loved your 35mms portraits. Haven’t tried any portraits with this yet. The square format offers a lot but I think I’ll find I’ll be overthinking subject placement when I try it for some portrait shots.

And yes, do post some more Michael.

I did get a light tripod but decided on the 1545T with the kit head. I figured I’d be cross if I didn’t like the weight of the 2545T and I reckon the lighter one is fine for the Hasselblad especially with the column down and the last leg section retracted. I could walk for miles with it over my shoulder. The main disadvantage is the lack of a friction hold adjustment on the head. It’s with the tripod use that the quick easy removal of the Hasselblad neckstrap is so convenient.
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Old 09-29-2018   #85
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Our garden has been a frequent subject this year. My Manfrotto 190 Aluminium tripod is behind the door in the front room with the wonderful CB40 Leofoto ballhead. Late afternoon or early morning are the usual times to rush out and take yet another shot.


Hasselblad 500CM 60 Distagon CF 3.5 Ektar 100
by Richard, on Flickr



I discovered this behind the renovated building across the road from where I work. I've walked every street of this suburb at lunchtimes and know the front of this place but never saw this before. Same lens on Tri-X.



Richmond
by Richard, on Flickr


And this is another frequent subject. This one the Planar 80 2.8 and kodak Ektar 100.



Romantic House with the marzipan borders
by Richard, on Flickr
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Old 12-31-2018   #86
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Snafu #7(?)

Bill Anders took one shot of the Earth Rise in black and white before asking for a colour film. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=LHbFIieK-uo). For the New Year fireworks I loaded a magazine of Ektar ready to go. When I got to the end of the street I was surprised that there were six shots gone in the magazine. I had had two glasses of champagne. What I had was Tri-X, but I only worked that out this morning, so puzzled by the 'empty' magazine in my bag which had an Ektar film box end and was on Nr 1. Sure enough the film I removed last night was Tri-X. Hopefully the compositions were lousy. My wife is not impressed at all. I think I had the Tri-X on the camera to use up the film yesterday so I could have two full magazines of Ektar. Tiredness and even good champagne and cameras don't mix. There's always next year.
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Old 12-31-2018   #87
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If you live in an area with a professional sports team that plays outdoors, especially a baseball team, they usually have occasions to set off fireworks.

Since I last posted here, I bought a 500C off a member of another forum. It came with the standard chrome 80 and waist level finder, and one 120 back. I ordered an A16 back before it arrived, but that is not getting any use because when the camera showed up, it was a constructive loss. There are so many things wrong with it, it is cost prohibitive to get it repaired. Makes a really nice paperweight though.

What with everything that has happened with me in 2018, I'm thinking of taking a while before I get serious about another Hassy.

Happy New Year, Richard, and I hope you get many photo opportunities to use your 500CM.

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Old 12-31-2018   #88
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Thanks PF. Sorry to hear bout your experience with this camera. The member I bought from here had photographed the equipment so expertly that it gave me the confidence to go ahead with the purchase. But with the long trip from the US to Australia I did wonder how it would all arrive. He had carefully taped each lens cap on two sides to the filter rim of the lenses. The amount of packing and ballast etc would have made this a safe shipment to Tranquility Base on the Moon I reckon. I was lucky to get such a trouble-free camera.

Here's the Ektar I should have been shooting last night:


Hasselblad 500CM 150mm Sonnar f4 Kodak Ektar 100
by Richard, on Flickr
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Old 01-01-2019   #89
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I use the trusty 'ole scruffy Domke F2 bags which carries a lot of stuff, including personal stuff. Too big a bag and it starts getting heavy. I've never paid more than 25 US Bucks for a Domke F2, actually I have four or five of them in the studio. And it doesn't look like a camera bag to most folks. I also have the Domke 803 Messenger Bag, I really love that one. I can carry around the 500C/M with the 350mm F5.6 Sonnar attached in that one! I recommend them both. Just get a nice insert for the 803 if you go that route. I bought mine from MPX for ten bucks, and B&H was blowing out the 803 at the time. I've used it as my daily work bag for ten years solid. And I get a lot of compliments on the 803.
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Old 01-01-2019   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard G View Post
Thanks PF. Sorry to hear bout your experience with this camera. The member I bought from here had photographed the equipment so expertly that it gave me the confidence to go ahead with the purchase. But with the long trip from the US to Australia I did wonder how it would all arrive. He had carefully taped each lens cap on two sides to the filter rim of the lenses. The amount of packing and ballast etc would have made this a safe shipment to Tranquility Base on the Moon I reckon. I was lucky to get such a trouble-free camera.

Here's the Ektar I should have been shooting last night:


Hasselblad 500CM 150mm Sonnar f4 Kodak Ektar 100
by Richard, on Flickr
Beautiful results, Richard.

The camera I bought came with known faults, but after making an assessment of the total, it just wasn't worth fixing. I'd have had to replace the A12 back anyway because it didn't have a matching insert, the body shutter jams, and the lens shutter doesn't work. I think everything has been forced, and I don't have parts to fix it, nor the expertise. It's quite more complicated than most cameras I've repaired. But it was well packed for the journey from Venezuela.

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Old 01-02-2019   #91
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Get a prism finder and it gets even better.

I canīt understand how anyone gets used to following movement on a reverse image.

Hassleblad is a great portrait studio camera. Rollei TLR is better for candid shooting and reportage.

I want the SWC.

The Xpan is a trendy camera therefore too expensive.

talking about expensive.. the Hasselblad bayonet makes filter buying an expensive exercise. Itīs a very good system but elitist in every possible way

The Zeiss Sonnar 150mm is the best lens i ever shot with. Itīs ultra sharp and the tonal range it produces is unbelievable.
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Old 01-02-2019   #92
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Thanks. I did get an old unmetered prism finder and use it regularly but it makes the whole rig a lot heavier. The slight abstraction of the waist level finder is a little less seductive than the prism view and shooting low with this or a TLR is part of the magic of what they produce. The prism finder is a necessity to stop calling for a ladder for some shots. Glad to hear such praise for the Sonnar: I’m certainly enjoying what it has to offer.
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Old 01-02-2019   #93
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Thanks. I did get an old unmetered prism finder and use it regularly but it makes the whole rig a lot heavier. The slight abstraction of the waist level finder is a little less seductive than the prism view and shooting low with this or a TLR is part of the magic of what they produce. The prism finder is a necessity to stop calling for a ladder for some shots. Glad to hear such praise for the Sonnar: I’m certainly enjoying what it has to offer.
Looking at a BW negative shot w/ a Hasselblad is quite an experience. Lush!
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Old 01-02-2019   #94
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I carried four Hasselblads around on weekends for many many years. 95% was handheld, 5% tripod. You can get used to the reverse aspects, but sometimes prism is the best way to go, I have six or eight of them around the studio. I carried 8-10 120 & 220 mags, loading on the fly. Now that I am older, and doing only personal work, I will take out a 500C/M with 80mm lens, waist level finder, or stovepipe; that is my favorite blad finder; you should get one or at least try it.

Enjoy your equipment, remember they made over a hundred accessories for these things. I know 'cause I have 70% of them at my disposal. I have really tried to buy everything cheap-cheap. For instance I wouldn't pay more than five bucks for any Bay50 blad filter. I used to buy piles of them.
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Old 01-02-2019   #95
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I carried four Hasselblads around on weekends for many many years. 95% was handheld, 5% tripod. You can get used to the reverse aspects, but sometimes prism is the best way to go, I have six or eight of them around the studio. I carried 8-10 120 & 220 mags, loading on the fly. Now that I am older, and doing only personal work, I will take out a 500C/M with 80mm lens, waist level finder, or stovepipe; that is my favorite blad finder; you should get one or at least try it.

Enjoy your equipment, remember they made over a hundred accessories for these things. I know 'cause I have 70% of them at my disposal. I have really tried to buy everything cheap-cheap. For instance I wouldn't pay more than five bucks for any Bay50 blad filter. I used to buy piles of them.
Hasselblads went obscenely cheap a while ago. Now it recovers some of its dignity but not in Leica league.
I remember paying serious money on 3 Softars when i had the system.

Yes: the stove pipe is awesome.

Hassleblads are not heavy. They are lightweight cameras. Their operation is more complex than TLRs.: 2 shutters, backs, slides, lenses..
Since the body is compact, very compact, itīs harder to balance for some people. I rather shoot the huge Pentax 67 (w/ the wood grip!) handheld than Hasselblads.
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Old 01-02-2019   #96
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Irving Penn had a Rollei with a Hasselblad Stovepipe adapted to fit it.

I always thought that was super cool.

If I ever buy a Rollei (which I have resisted) I would mod it to that in a heartbeat.
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Old 01-06-2019   #97
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Perusing the Sunday New York Times this morning, I couldn't help but notice two (count 'em, two) photo essays shot with the 'blad.
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Old 01-06-2019   #98
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Irving Penn had a Rollei with a Hasselblad Stovepipe adapted to fit it.

I always thought that was super cool.

If I ever buy a Rollei (which I have resisted) I would mod it to that in a heartbeat.
I find the Rollei TLR a quintessential camera.

Itīs perfect and i am not even talking about the optics. Most cameras have excellent optics. Itīs the design, the concept:

Itīs a light, small camera (for a 120 film camera). Itīs silent. Its ergonomics are brilliant.

Usually you shoot Rolleis w/ an assistant. You shoot them quick, very quick.. when you finish the film, your assistant throws another body at your hands.

Ok.. i will talk about the optics.. there is some magic in those lenses and how they deal w/ space, groups of people and portraits. The Rollei is a peopleīs camera. Even more than Leica. Rollei is about humanity, about how we look and how we gather around each other. Just look at Pennīs book: worlds within a small room. Penn writes a chapter on the book about the camera! He acknowledges the camera as truly important for those images. I never saw that happen in any other masterful photo book.
I had to have a Rollei because of Penn and made sure to buy a 3.5 because that was the lens he used. Not the big 2.8.
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Old 01-08-2019   #99
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Enjoy your Hasselblad Richard!

And my experience differs from what you hear on the internet regarding shutter speed. I haven't found the mirror slap to be a problem. The ka-whumpf is loud, but I'm not convinced it is causing shake problems. I'm the problem. I've been using a 645 with an 80mm lens and the focus length is the challenge to keeping things sharp and not the mirror. If you do things well, like brace the finder against your head and are careful with tripping the shutter, you'll be fine at speeds lower than 1/250th, irrespective of the mirror slap.
I believe that Hasselblad once claimed and maybe had an ad showing that a coin balanced on top of a folded waist level viewfinder did not get shaken off by mirror slap. I never saw this. I have handheld my 500 C/M and 503 CX a lot and have not had a problem. I do try to stay at a 250th of a second handheld though. I also use a tripod a lot and always pre-release the mirror and rear shutter when I do, at least with non-moving subjects. I figure that if I am going to the trouble of using a tripod, I might as well get the full benefit.

There is a unique quality to medium format black and white photography compared to 35mm and digital. I'm not sure that I see the same distinction between MF colir and modern digital though.

Enjoy your new machine.
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Old 01-10-2019   #100
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Quote:
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Just look at Pennīs book: worlds within a small room. Penn writes a chapter on the book about the camera! He acknowledges the camera as trully ijmportant for those images. I never saw that happen in any other masterfull photo book. I had to have a Rollei because of Penn and made sure to buy a 3.5 because that was the lens he used. Not the big 2.8.
Thank you for reminding me of this book. I have been looking for a copy for a while on and off. And now I just found one.
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Old 01-10-2019   #101
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I find the Rollei TLR a quintessential camera.

Itīs perfect and i am not even talking about the optics. Most cameras have excellent optics. Itīs the design, the concept:

Itīs a light, small camera (for a 120 film camera). Itīs silent. Its ergonomics are brilliant.

Usually you shoot Rolleis w/ an assistant. You shoot them quick, very quick.. when you finish the film, your assistant throws another body at your hands.

Ok.. i will talk about the optics.. there is some magic in those lenses and how they deal w/ space, groups of people and portraits. The Rollei is a peopleīs camera. Even more than Leica. Rollei is about humanity, about how we look and how we gather around each other. Just look at Pennīs book: worlds within a small room. Penn writes a chapter on the book about the camera! He acknowledges the camera as truly important for those images. I never saw that happen in any other masterful photo book.
I had to have a Rollei because of Penn and made sure to buy a 3.5 because that was the lens he used. Not the big 2.8.
Beautifully said. And I agree about the 3.5.
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Old 01-10-2019   #102
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The Hasselblad Stovepipe completes the Rollei. As it does also the Hasselblad.

001 by Nokton48, on Flickr
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Old 01-13-2019   #103
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I have a confession.
After less than a year of ownership I no longer have my Hasselblad. It’s a great camera, but in the end not for me. It usually takes owning and using a camera for a while to see if it is for you. It was always a dream camera, but dreams do not always align with reality. I’m glad I had the experience, and I loved the images that I got from it.
I can’t believe this, but for the first time in over a decade I didn’t have a film camera. A weird experience.
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Old 01-13-2019   #104
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Got to try these things Michael. Not all will stick. I'm not bored yet.

Here's the little yellow daisy....


Hasselblad 500CM 60 Distagon Ektar 100
by Richard, on Flickr
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Old 01-13-2019   #105
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Had to try the Barnacks too. They also stuck with me. This IIIf is a great little camera. The Sonnar 150 is magic. Tried this with Portrait mode on the iPhone and the upper edge and especially the accessory finder bled into the out of focus area. Not good.


Hasselblad 500CM Sonnar 150 Ektar 100
by Richard, on Flickr
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Old 01-13-2019   #106
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Maybe you all saw this about one of the most famous Hasselblad shots ever? The Sonnar 250 for this one. It’s a tribute to the camera you have with you, the merits of being organised, the value of exposure tables over light meters and disobeying plans and schedules. And bracketing with colour reversal film.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LHbFIieK-uo#
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Old 01-14-2019   #107
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Maybe you all saw this about one of the most famous Hasselblad shots ever? The Sonnar 250 for this one. It’s a tribute to the camera you have with you, the merits of being organised, the value of exposure tables over light meters and disobeying plans and schedules. And bracketing with colour reversal film.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LHbFIieK-uo#
If ever a photo was about being in the right place at the right time! Love that image.
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Old 01-14-2019   #108
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Hasselblad was always my "dream" camera.
Having to use Advertising agencies models,
with incorrect inserts in magazines, lenses mis-used,
easy risk of jams and horrible loading of film after my Rollei Automat..
I would pass my studio, pick up my Mamiya C3,33 or 330 as time went by..
65mm, 80mm, 135mm and ultra sharp (too sharp) 180mm..
use that inplace of Hassie.
Only once was questioned no "cut outs" on positives or negatives..
"I taped over!" said the liar.
Mamiya was great but no match for Hasselblad lenses..
Pentax 6x7 offered way larger format and easy framing with prism, standard equipment.
Traded 6x7 and lenses to Sammy's in LA for my M6ttl.
Medium format covered by Penn's choice, Rollei Automat 75mm Tessar.

Last edited by leicapixie : 01-14-2019 at 04:33. Reason: left out a few lines..
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Old 01-14-2019   #109
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Hasselblad was my dream camera for decades, too. But now that I could easily afford one, I realized that I don't like the square 6x6 format, so I bought a Mamiya RZ 67 with three lenses. Contrary to what is stated above, Mamiya Sekor Z lenses are fantastic!
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Old 01-14-2019   #110
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My Uncle Ned Westover used Hasselblads in the 1960s on his photo travels all over the world. I never dreamed I would be able to afford one, but prices are now fairly reasonable.

I joined the Hassy posse in 2017 when I got a 500 c/m with the 80 Planar from a member here. Got an extra A12 back and then got a new tripod for Christmas, with a Manfrotto ball head with quick release plate. Went out yesterday and shot three rolls of Portra 400 at the "golden hour" along the American River in Sacramento. Everything fell into place, and I look forward to more landscape photography with this kit.

I've got a Rolleiflex Automat and a Rolleicord, and they're wonderful cameras and much lighter to carry than the Hasselblad, but the Hassy works beautifully as a camera for use on a tripod. It slows down the process of picture taking, as people have noted above, which for certain kinds of work is a good thing.
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Old 01-20-2019   #111
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Got to try these things Michael. Not all will stick. I'm not bored yet.
I’m glad your not bored, I’m still loving your journey! I didn’t get bored, it just wasn’t getting used. I don’t like having things around that don’t get used, I’d prefer to pass it on and someone else can enjoy it.
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Old 01-20-2019   #112
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Originally Posted by Bingley View Post
My Uncle Ned Westover used Hasselblads in the 1960s on his photo travels all over the world. I never dreamed I would be able to afford one, but prices are now fairly reasonable.

I joined the Hassy posse in 2017 when I got a 500 c/m with the 80 Planar from a member here. Got an extra A12 back and then got a new tripod for Christmas, with a Manfrotto ball head with quick release plate. Went out yesterday and shot three rolls of Portra 400 at the "golden hour" along the American River in Sacramento. Everything fell into place, and I look forward to more landscape photography with this kit.

I've got a Rolleiflex Automat and a Rolleicord, and they're wonderful cameras and much lighter to carry than the Hasselblad, but the Hassy works beautifully as a camera for use on a tripod. It slows down the process of picture taking, as people have noted above, which for certain kinds of work is a good thing.
Great James. I’ll look out for those in the Gallery. I’m back to using the Automat now too. Sweet camera and the Rolleinars are fun.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #113
Richard G
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Can't not get the Hasselblad out when there's tullps on the hearth...

This is the 150 C Sonnar. I see more in this than I saw in the flesh as it were. The tones in those petals are wondrous. Slightly out of date Velvia 100. Sturdy tripod, mirror and body shutter pre-release, cable release. Probably 1 second at f11.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #114
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Can't not get the Hasselblad out when there's tullps on the hearth...

This is the 150 C Sonnar. I see more in this than I saw in the flesh as it were. The tones in those petals are wondrous. Slightly out of date Velvia 100. Sturdy tripod, mirror and body shutter pre-release, cable release. Probably 1 second at f11.
Beautiful, Richard!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #115
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Thanks very much Lynn.


500 CM 60 Distagon
by Richard, on Flickr
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Old 1 Week Ago   #116
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Bokeh is emphasised on the Blad, isn't it? And lovely scans too Richard.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #117
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Lovely flowers!

I must get my Hasselblad 500CM out and do some shooting with it. It is such a wonderful camera ... I've been concentrating on other things for a while now, it's time to revisit this one.

Particularly as I contemplate buying Hasselblad's new CFV50c II digital back that was announced for it...

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Old 1 Week Ago   #118
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Thanks John and Godfrey. The dance of the technology is very calming and absorbing. I was photographing some lovely little daisies in front of a neighbour’s house with the Rolleiflex a few years ago. He was the Premier of our state. He and his wife returned from an outing with me hunched over my camera and tripod in front of their house. I apologized for the appearance of a stake-out. His wife asked if I’m interested in flowers. I said that it was more the photography I was interested in. But she was right. And it’s tulips most of all.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #119
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And thanks for the update on the new CFV50 II Godfrey.

Old meets new in this video:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gNJPmk5wIHw

I nearly bought a Phase One back second hand. It was just too heavy. And the format is not square. And I love the film, itself, the loading and the 12 shots only, and the waiting. But this new back is tempting indeed.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #120
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Originally Posted by Richard G View Post
And thanks for the update on the new CFV50 II Godfrey.

Old meets new in this video:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gNJPmk5wIHw

I nearly bought a Phase One back second hand. It was just too heavy. And the format is not square. And I love the film, itself, the loading and the 12 shots only, and the waiting. But this new back is tempting indeed.
I enjoy shooting with film. I just know that I'm much more productive with digital capture, and can do more because of it. It's not really a matter of how many exposures ...I often go out for a session and come back with two or three exposures.

I would mostly fit a square frame crop in the viewfinder, rendering my Hasselblad to be a 33x33 camera rather than 56x56. If I then drop down one lens in my range of lenses (50, 80, 120, 150 mm), I get the same approximate FoV range I have now minus the wide and plus a longer tele. If I want a wider lens, the 907x body and XCD 21mm lens beckons.

I'm more than just tempted. Waiting for the back and the 907x body to become available so I can set up a demo and test it out to see how it works...

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