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Every photographer could watch Alfonso Cuaronīs Roma,
Old 12-15-2018   #1
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Every photographer could watch Alfonso Cuaronīs Roma,

Shot by the director himself in beautiful black and white (donīt know if film or video).. itīs a recreation of his childhood in 1970s Mexico city.

The film is carried by Cuaronīs photography and his long takes are unbelievably complex.
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Old 12-15-2018   #2
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second the great cinematography. i saw it at the hammer this wednesday, and people everywhere were crying.
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Old 12-16-2018   #3
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second the great cinematography. i saw it at the hammer this Wednesday, and people everywhere were crying.
Itīs a masterpiece. What is it? Film? Digital more likely.

Form opening to end, itīs the photography that is carrying the story in ways i have not seen before.
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Old 12-16-2018   #4
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One of the few films made for adults these days. I felt the influence of Italian neorealism -- Rossellini, de Sica, early Fellini.
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Old 12-16-2018   #5
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One of the few films made for adults these days. I felt the influence of Italian neorealism -- Rossellini, de Sica, early Fellini.
Absolutely! It reminds me of Fellini. The martial arts class is pure Fellini.
There is also something from Orson Welles on those impossible mastershots that go from inside to outside scenes.
Cuaron is a monster.
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Old 12-16-2018   #6
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I just watched it last night. I marveled at how they achieved their lighting across such broadranging scenes, especially on the long runs and interior/exterior runs.
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Old 12-16-2018   #7
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I just watched it last night. I marveled at how they achieved their lighting across such broadranging scenes, especially on the long runs and interior/exterior runs.
Yeah. Itīs jaw dropping technically brilliant. How about those scenes inside the cinema?
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Old 12-16-2018   #8
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And there is a long master shot where the camera goes w/ Cleo in the waves. Itīs freaking beautifull.

I never seen a film where photography is the main narrative tool.
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Old 12-16-2018   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colker View Post
Itīs a masterpiece. What is it? Film? Digital more likely.

Form opening to end, itīs the photography that is carrying the story in ways i have not seen before.
Large Format Digital, Arri Alexa 65, but the capturing medium shouldn't matter. Though Cuaron said in an interview that he wanted a digital look. It Looks beautiful but it lacks some texture, that was part of the neo verismo movies and was the result of a bit of filmgrain and low budget.
Still beautiful no matter the medium
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Old 12-16-2018   #10
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Originally Posted by DominikDUK View Post
Large Format Digital, Arri Alexa 65, but the capturing medium shouldn't matter. Though Cuaron said in an interview that he wanted a digital look. It Looks beautiful but it lacks some texture, that was part of the neo verismo movies and was the result of a bit of filmgrain and low budget.
Still beautiful no matter the medium
I agree; capturing medium should not matter. There are very few close ups ... and then there is a beautifull classic portrait done w/ wide angle of Cleo close to the end.
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Old 12-16-2018   #11
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Originally Posted by DominikDUK View Post
Though Cuaron said in an interview that he wanted a digital look.
I think that applies to the deep depth of field, sharpness was deep, near to far, which I appreciated artistically as purposeful. Especially say in the street scenes in front of the house, or interiors with activity happening outside the windows in the scene.
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Old 12-16-2018   #12
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I will look tonight!


Erik.
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Old 12-16-2018   #13
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I think that applies to the deep depth of field, sharpness was deep, near to far, which I appreciated artistically as purposeful. Especially say in the street scenes in front of the house, or interiors with activity happening outside the windows in the scene.
Orson Welles did it in Citizen Kane... it was shot for maximum depth of field.
The movie hit me as part Fellini, part Welles.
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Old 12-17-2018   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vbsoto View Post
I think that applies to the deep depth of field, sharpness was deep, near to far, which I appreciated artistically as purposeful. Especially say in the street scenes in front of the house, or interiors with activity happening outside the windows in the scene.
Here his direct quote and it has nothing to do with deep focus "I didn't want this to a be a vintage black-and-white — a black-and-white that would look like something done in the '60s or the '50s," he says. "I wanted a digital black-and-white that would embrace digital, not try to hide the digital quality of it, with amazing resolution and amazing dynamic range and amazing definition." He certainly achieved that but it did cost him texture which this film is missing imo.
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Old 12-17-2018   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DominikDUK View Post
Here his direct quote and it has nothing to do with deep focus "I didn't want this to a be a vintage black-and-white — a black-and-white that would look like something done in the '60s or the '50s," he says. "I wanted a digital black-and-white that would embrace digital, not try to hide the digital quality of it, with amazing resolution and amazing dynamic range and amazing definition." He certainly achieved that but it did cost him texture which this film is missing imo.

What i find amazing is how photography narrates the story. Even though it is highly emotional the script is thin. Scenes are not based on dialogue or acting but on plasticity and visual elements. We know there is something wrong w/ the Gringos in the ranch because of the embalmed dog heads. Everything else in the movie happens as a photographic image.



Itīs the first time i watch such thing happen in movies.
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Old 12-17-2018   #16
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All of Cuaron's work is really incredible as far as cinematography goes. Children of Men, Gravity, and Y Tu Mama Tambien are all masterpieces as far as cinematography goes. He embraces long cuts through and through. Haven't seen Roma yet, but considering that Cuaron makes up a good cunk of my top 10 films of all time list, really looking forward to it.
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Old 12-17-2018   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colker View Post
And there is a long master shot where the camera goes w/ Cleo in the waves. Itīs freaking beautifull.

I never seen a film where photography is the main narrative tool.
Agreed ... Roma is Beautiful

Re: “I never seen a film where photography is the main narrative tool”
Watch films by the cinematographer: Sven Nykvist
His work was transformed while working with Ingmar Bergman. Bergman films were truly special because of Sven’s use of Shadows & Light.

Sven was one of the Greatest Cinematographers.... His range & style working with light/ film is quite Beautiful... Extraordinary

Article / Video about Sven:
https://wolfcrow.com/blog/understand...-sven-nykvist/
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Old 12-17-2018   #18
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The conformist directed by Bertolucci is another example as is the last emperor also by Bertolucci both film were shot in color but photography (color and light) is the main narrative tool as it is in most visually great movies.
Vargtimmen (the hour of the Wolf) Bergmann's only "Horror" Movie is another great example and was of course shot by Nykvist
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Old 12-17-2018   #19
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Originally Posted by DominikDUK View Post
The conformist directed by Bertolucci is another example as is the last emperor also by Bertolucci both film were shot in color but photography (color and light) is the main narrative tool as it is in most visually great movies.
Vargtimmen (the hour of the Wolf) Bergmann's only "Horror" Movie is another great example and was of course shot by Nykvist

Fermin(the martial arts muchacho) seems drawn right out of the Conformist btw. I have seen it long ago and have a fuzzy memory of this movie. I do remember the Last Emperor. Donīt you think Roma carries more weight on visuals as story telling?
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Old 12-17-2018   #20
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Originally Posted by helenhill View Post
Agreed ... Roma is Beautiful

Re: “I never seen a film where photography is the main narrative tool”
Watch films by the cinematographer: Sven Nykvist
His work was transformed while working with Ingmar Bergman. Bergman films were truly special because of Sven’s use of Shadows & Light.

Sven was one of the Greatest Cinematographers.... His range & style working with light/ film is quite Beautiful... Extraordinary

Article / Video about Sven:
https://wolfcrow.com/blog/understand...-sven-nykvist/

Sure... but Bergman writes complex scenes of dialogue and acting. His scriptwritting is dense. Persona is very visual but acting carries the story. Those close on Persona are everything. Roma is about visual memory. No actor has even a close up during the scenes.
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Old 12-17-2018   #21
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Have the screener and need to watch it but I also recommend "The Favourite " for some spectacular cinematography. Interesting use of UWA's and it was shot oin film with a lot of natural light, ala Barry Lyndon.
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Old 12-17-2018   #22
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Sure... but Bergman writes complex scenes of dialogue and acting. His scriptwritting is dense. Persona is very visual but acting carries the story. Those close on Persona are everything. Roma is about visual memory. No actor has even a close up during the scenes.
Hah, we are different and that is Fine
I stopped watching Bergman films for Plot years ago
(The intensity of the plot could push you to slit a wrist)
I watch Bergman films for Sven’s cinematography ...
The Lighting, the shadows the way he draws a scene, a room, a character, is magnificent
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Old 12-17-2018   #23
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Gunnar Fischer's work on Bergmann's early movies is definetely Nykvist's equal. (7th Seal, Wild Strawberries. etc...) Though I absolutely love Nykvist's work on Vargtimmen (Hour of the Wolf). There is Dialogue in Bergmann movies but most of them work with the sound turned off. I do that quiet often turn iff the sound and just watch the movie not only Bergmann.
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Old 12-17-2018   #24
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Quote:
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Orson Welles did it in Citizen Kane... it was shot for maximum depth of field.
The movie hit me as part Fellini, part Welles.
It gave me the very same impression. Early Fellini + Welles. There was consistent use of wide angle lenses and deep focusing for layered planes of action. It reminded me also of Diego Rivera's gigantic murals. Great, great movie.
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Old 12-17-2018   #25
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It gave me the very same impression. Early Fellini + Welles. There was consistent use of wide angle lenses and deep focusing for layered planes of action. It reminded me also of Diego Rivera's gigantic murals. Great, great movie.

Good call on Rivera.
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