Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Classic Film RangeFinders & Other Classics > SLRs - the unRF

SLRs - the unRF For those of you who must talk about SLRs, if only to confirm they are not RF.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Considering a Canon New F-1, tell me about them
Old 06-01-2018   #1
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
Considering a Canon New F-1, tell me about them

Iíve been on a nostalgia kick for a few years inexpensively picking up cameras I either used to own (Nikon F, Pentax MX) or always wanted (Nikon FM2A and F5.) One camera I always admired back in the day but never owned was the Canon New F-1 (not the earlier all mechanical F-1 or F-1n.) I use these cameras sparingly, but nevertheless enjoy them.

The New F-1 was an interesting competitor to the F3 back in the 80s. I was all Nikon and Leica at the time, but one stringer from another paper had a pair of them. I thought they were pretty neat, too bad they were Canons. ;-)

I just fell into a AE Motor FN and AA battery pack for a song, so I think Iím going to keep an eye out for a clean New F-1 with the AE prism and one or two lenses. Is there anything I should watch out for? Who is the repair guru for Canons of this era in the case I want a CLA?
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-01-2018   #2
Mackinaw
Think Different
 
Mackinaw is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
Posts: 3,508
A well designed, well engineered 35mm systems camera. Shutter-speed preferred automation with a motor or winder, aperture-preferred automation with the AE finder, choice of three different metering patterns (center weighted, spot, and a 12% rectangle) depending on the viewing screens used. Slower speeds to 1/60 are battery powered, speeds from 1/90 to 1/2000 operate without a battery. Well built and solid.

As for a good repair tech, Ken Oikawa in California. Ken’s a retired Canon repair tech who specializes in Canon FD and FL cameras/lenses. Excellent service with fast turnaround.

Jim B.
__________________
My fancy-schmancy gallery:
http://snowcountryphotography.com

My RFF Gallery:
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/phot...user=1453&sl=m
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-01-2018   #3
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Age: 37
Posts: 4,548
The New F-1 is the most Contax-ish feeling body Canon made, except for the shutter and film advance, which are "crunchy." I've seen a couple bodies at the camera show aside from mine, and they all make a metallic ping when you trip the shutter.

But whatever, it's a good camera. Great viewfinder (97% coverage) and metering display. It's my main 35mm SLR body, with the Nikon F and Pentax Spotmatic on the side for occasional recreational purposes, and the Pentax LX tempts me from afar.
__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-01-2018   #4
dxq.canada
Registered User
 
dxq.canada's Avatar
 
dxq.canada is offline
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 135
I had gone through many Canon SLR cameras ... and the New F-1 was the best.
Felt great in the hand, AE viewfinder is large, very bright ground screens ... dependable.
I used the Winder without the battery just as a grip.


... I actually like the crunchy winding noise it made.
__________________
.
.
My repair blog: http://oldcam.wordpress.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-01-2018   #5
flagellum
Registered User
 
flagellum is offline
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 47
Probably my favorite 35mm camera, they’re built like bricks but also have a sort of rugged elegance to them. Honestly feels just as solid as my Leica M4, plus it has the nice combo of being a matte black (similar to a black chrome Leica) but also Brassing nicely. The only thing to keep in mind is the electronics; my first F-1 pretty much fell apart because the electronics went bit by bit. they don’t seem to be easy to fix in this regard, as even Ken Oikawa couldn’t set mine straight. As pro cameras, some have obviously had heavy use. Maybe not a camera that will work for another 100 Years to come, but one of the best built and most enjoyable cameras you can use right now.

Do see that whatever f-1 you buy has the motor caps included on the bottom plate, as the body will leak light without the one nearest the film cassette side. Many eBay f-1s don’t always have these.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-01-2018   #6
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 43
Posts: 8,890
I had one, and while it was an interesting camera, I would not buy another.

The system's design is kind of a kludge. To use aperture priority AE, you need the AE Prism finder. Actually, AE works with the standard finder, but you don't get any readout in the finder of what shutter speed is going to be used. This is silly; there's no reason to require a separate finder for Aperture Priority AE. Every other camera that offers it, like the Nikon F3, does so without requiring an expensive viewfinder.

Shutter Priority AE won't work at all without a motor drive or winder attached! You sometimes see this explained away as "The camera needs more battery power for Shutter Priority, and the winder or motor provides it." That may be so, but there is also a mechanical connection between the camera and winder or motor that actually operates part of the Shutter Priority AE mechanism in the camera. Canon managed to put this feature in the AE-1 and A1 bodies without requiring a heavy, expensive wonder or motor to make it work.

The metering pattern selection is one of the worst parts of the system. The camera offers the choice of Centerweighted, Partial Metering (a large rectangle in the middle of the screen), and Spot metering. This is nice, but unlike the Olympus OM-4 (a contemporary of the New F-1), you cannot change metering pattern by pushing a button. You have to change the focusing screen! The screens control meter pattern because a prism built into each screen redirects some of the light to the camera's meter cell. The size and shape of this prism inside the focusing screen determines the meter pattern.

This sucks for two reasons: You're stuck with the screen's meter pattern unless you go to the bother of installing a different screen, and the area of the meter pattern in the Partial and Spot screens is a bit darker than the rest of the screen. Because this is in the middle of the screen, where the focusing aids are located, it actually makes focusing a little harder!

Another issue I had was that the metering indicator in the viewfinder in manual mode was often inaccurate. There's a scale of lens apertures and a moving needle. The needle points to the aperture the meter thinks you should use. This was always accurate. The problem is there's a second indicator, a circle, that moves when you change the aperture on your lens. This circle moves over the aperture scale in the finder to show you what aperture you have the lens set at. With some lenses I had, the circle indicator was off a half a stop or so. Repairmen told me conflicting stories on this. Some said the lenses needed adjustment, others said it was impossible to fix. The thing is, Canon could have avoided the whole damned problem by using a little lens that looked at the actual lens aperture ring to show the aperture set. The AE finder does this, but ONLY in the Aperture Priority AE mode. In manual, even with the AE finder, you got the aperture scale with the inaccurate moving circle.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-01-2018   #7
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Age: 37
Posts: 4,548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
Every other camera that offers it, like the Nikon F3, does so without requiring an expensive viewfinder.
Almost all New F-1's come with the AE finder, so it's not really an additional expense. It's more likely that you'll have to hunt down a non-metered finder if you want one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
The metering pattern selection is one of the worst parts of the system. The camera offers the choice of Centerweighted, Partial Metering (a large rectangle in the middle of the screen), and Spot metering. This is nice, but unlike the Olympus OM-4 (a contemporary of the New F-1), you cannot change metering pattern by pushing a button. You have to change the focusing screen! The screens control meter pattern because a prism built into each screen redirects some of the light to the camera's meter cell. The size and shape of this prism inside the focusing screen determines the meter pattern.

This sucks for two reasons: You're stuck with the screen's meter pattern unless you go to the bother of installing a different screen, and the area of the meter pattern in the Partial and Spot screens is a bit darker than the rest of the screen. Because this is in the middle of the screen, where the focusing aids are located, it actually makes focusing a little harder!
This just points to the Olympus OM-4's strength, because none of the comparable cameras at the time had metering systems that were as advanced. The Nikon F3 had a heavy center-weighted metering with no other options. The Pentax LX also only had center-weighted. Second place isn't so bad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
Another issue I had was that the metering indicator in the viewfinder in manual mode was often inaccurate. There's a scale of lens apertures and a moving needle. The needle points to the aperture the meter thinks you should use. This was always accurate. The problem is there's a second indicator, a circle, that moves when you change the aperture on your lens. This circle moves over the aperture scale in the finder to show you what aperture you have the lens set at. With some lenses I had, the circle indicator was off a half a stop or so. Repairmen told me conflicting stories on this. Some said the lenses needed adjustment, others said it was impossible to fix. The thing is, Canon could have avoided the whole damned problem by using a little lens that looked at the actual lens aperture ring to show the aperture set. The AE finder does this, but ONLY in the Aperture Priority AE mode. In manual, even with the AE finder, you got the aperture scale with the inaccurate moving circle.
This is something I've had to adjust on one of my Canon FD lenses. The lens repair manual explains how to fix it, and it's pretty easy. I don't know why repairmen would give conflicting opinions.
__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-01-2018   #8
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 43
Posts: 8,890
Quote:
Originally Posted by aizan View Post
This just points to the Olympus OM-4's strength, because none of the comparable cameras at the time had metering systems that were as advanced. The Nikon F3 had a heavy center-weighted metering with no other options. The Pentax LX also only had center-weighted. Second place isn't so bad.
Yeah, but Canon really chose just about the most byzantine way possible to implement the different meter patterns. It also made the focusing screens expensive because they were quite complex in design and construction, and the spot screens today are rare and expensive.


Quote:
This is something I've had to adjust on one of my Canon FD lenses. The lens repair manual explains how to fix it, and it's pretty easy. I don't know why repairmen would give conflicting opinions.
Probably because they didn't know how to fix the problem. Not every camera tech is competent, and that is a fairly obscure problem. I wish I had that repair manual, I'd have fixed mine!
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #9
rodt16s
Registered User
 
rodt16s is offline
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Wiltshire UK
Posts: 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by aizan View Post
This is something I've had to adjust on one of my Canon FD lenses. The lens repair manual explains how to fix it, and it's pretty easy. I don't know why repairmen would give conflicting opinions.
Mine has this issue.
How simple is it to adjust..? it is really annoying
__________________
M's, & OM's
Just taking pics of stuff.
flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #10
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
Great info, everyone!

As I said, this will be a side dalliance if I go through with it. I’m likely to only have one or two lenses, three at most - I don’t know Canon FD series lenses very well, but a 35 or 50 will likely be the first and possibly last, and maybe a 100 down the road if I find one at a reasonable price. The whole metering pattern thing is odd, but not really a concern - I’m happy with centerweighted.

I was a little surprised to see the camera does not take power from the motor or winder, that is a great feature of the F3 - none of mine over the years have ever had button batteries installed since they’ve all been motorized. And this motor is going to be a beast with *12* AAs, luckily I use Eneloops so the weight will be slightly reduced. This will be like back in my yoot when I had a pair of motorized F2s on my body at work, it was like doing calisthenics.
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #11
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Age: 37
Posts: 4,548
here are the pages that show how to adjust the aperture signal lever. if you want the whole manual, send me a pm and i'll forward a google drive link.



__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #12
Steve M.
Registered User
 
Steve M. is offline
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,321
They're really nice. Take FD and FL lenses, as well as Leica R and Nikon lenses w/ a $20 adapter (you put a $20 Nikon to Leica R mount on the Leica lens, then a Nikon to FD adapter. Works like a charm, and adds very little weight or length to the setup). You can also mount m42 screw mount lenses w/ a cheap adapter. It's a heavy camera, so it's stable. Build quality is professional. My preference is for the original F1 bodies. People often do a double take when they see the prong of a Nikon pre AI lens on a Canon camera :]

It's also big and heavy, as you know if you shoot the earlier versions. I preferred the Nikkormat cameras, but the Canon has better features and is more adaptable to other lenses. Different focus screens are available for the F1, but tend to be a little pricey.

The FD 50 1.4 and FD 85 1.8 are superb lenses (FL versions are great too, but they have different optical formulas than the FD lenses), and the 100 2.5 is a real sleeper. The 100 and 85 are excellent for portraits. When I had my F1, several older newspaper photographers came up to me to say how much they loved theirs back in the day, and how rugged they were.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #13
rodt16s
Registered User
 
rodt16s is offline
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Wiltshire UK
Posts: 640
Thanks for that info
Seems to affect all my lenses, which makes me wonder if it's the body
__________________
M's, & OM's
Just taking pics of stuff.
flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #14
Mackinaw
Think Different
 
Mackinaw is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
Posts: 3,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve M. View Post
.......The 50 1.4 and 85 1.8 are superb lenses, and the 100 2.5 is a real sleeper. The 100 and 85 are excellent for portraits.
100/2.5? Don't you mean 100/2.8?

Kubrick thought so highly of the FD 50/1.4, he hacked one to fit on a movie camera.

Jim B.
__________________
My fancy-schmancy gallery:
http://snowcountryphotography.com

My RFF Gallery:
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/phot...user=1453&sl=m
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #15
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
Thanks for the information, aizan - if you put the whole manual out there, I’ll take it!

Does anyone have firsthand info on the performance of the 100/2 vs. the 100/2.8?
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #16
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 43
Posts: 8,890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
Thanks for the information, aizan - if you put the whole manual out there, I’ll take it!

Does anyone have firsthand info on the performance of the 100/2 vs. the 100/2.8?
I have never used the 100mm f2, but I did have the 100mm f2.8 and it was VERY sharp and had nice bokeh.

Another really great lens was the 35mm f2.8; incredibly sharp, even wide open. I have also used 35mm lenses from Olympus, Nikon, Leica, and Zeiss (M-Mount ZM). The only lens that was equal to the Canon 35/2.8 was the Zeiss ZM 35mm f2.8C.

The 28mm f2.8 FD was sharp but had a lot of light falloff in the corners and edges. I had not seen that in Olympus or Nikon 28/2.8 lenses.

Make sure you buy the "New FD" series lenses, not the older FD lenses. The old ones have the silver ring you turn to lock the lens to the body, while the New FD lenses act more like a bayonet mount lens. The reason for saying to get the new-style is that if you use the AE Finder to do aperture-priority AE, the little lens that looks at the aperture setting on the lens cannot see the aperture ring on the old style lenses, so you lose that ability to see what aperture you have set in the finder.

If you only shoot manual, it doesn't matter. The old lenses are all metal, while the new ones have some plastic parts and are a lot lighter and more compact.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #17
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
I have never used the 100mm f2, but I did have the 100mm f2.8 and it was VERY sharp and had nice bokeh.


Another really great lens was the 35mm f2.8; incredibly sharp, even wide open. I have also used 35mm lenses from Olympus, Nikon, Leica, and Zeiss (M-Mount ZM). The only lens that was equal to the Canon 35/2.8 was the Zeiss ZM 35mm f2.8C.


The 28mm f2.8 FD was sharp but had a lot of light falloff in the corners and edges. I had not seen that in Olympus or Nikon 28/2.8 lenses.


Make sure you buy the "New FD" series lenses, not the older FD lenses. The old ones have the silver ring you turn to lock the lens to the body, while the New FD lenses act more like a bayonet mount lens. The reason for saying to get the new-style is that if you use the AE Finder to do aperture-priority AE, the little lens that looks at the aperture setting on the lens cannot see the aperture ring on the old style lenses, so you lose that ability to see what aperture you have set in the finder.


If you only shoot manual, it doesn't matter. The old lenses are all metal, while the new ones have some plastic parts and are a lot lighter and more compact.
Thanks! I was planning on sticking with the later non-chrome breech ring lenses, I had read about the ADR issues with the older ones.
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #18
Mackinaw
Think Different
 
Mackinaw is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
Posts: 3,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
Thanks! I was planning on sticking with the later non-chrome breech ring lenses, I had read about the ADR issues with the older ones.
ADR issues? What's that?

I only use the older breechlock mount lenses on my old F-1. Superb ďthey-donít-make-them-like-this-anymoreĒ build quality. All metal, a lot of brass, etc. Chris is right that the FDn lenses can be substantially smaller and lighter than the older FD lenses, but take them apart, (I have) and you see why (plastic). Plus the bayonet-style mount isnít as robustly built as the original breechlock ring versions.

Personal preference I suppose. Both the FD and FDn lenses work well. Iím sure youíll be happy with whatever you buy.

Jim B.
__________________
My fancy-schmancy gallery:
http://snowcountryphotography.com

My RFF Gallery:
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/phot...user=1453&sl=m
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #19
xayraa33
rangefinder user and fancier
 
xayraa33's Avatar
 
xayraa33 is offline
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 5,845
The Canon New F 1 is one of my favourite 35mm film SLR cameras, and it is on par with my Olympus OM 1 as the go to film SLR.

I never got into the Nikon gear, other than my RF S2 camera and their Nikkor LTM lenses for my Barnacks.
__________________
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #20
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 43
Posts: 8,890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
ADR issues? What's that?

Its what I explained in post #16. ADR stands for Aperture Direct Readout. Some cameras have a little lens built into the prism that projects an image of the lens's aperture ring to the viewfinder.

The Canon New F-1 has this with the AE Finder, but not the Standard Prism. If you use the AE Finder and want to see the aperture set on the lens through the ADR readout in the finder, you must use the New FD series lenses.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #21
Mackinaw
Think Different
 
Mackinaw is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
Posts: 3,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
Its what I explained in post #16. ADR stands for Aperture Direct Readout. Some cameras have a little lens built into the prism that projects an image of the lens's aperture ring to the viewfinder.

The Canon New F-1 has this with the AE Finder, but not the Standard Prism. If you use the AE Finder and want to see the aperture set on the lens through the ADR readout in the finder, you must use the New FD series lenses.
Gotcha. Thanks for the explanation.

Jim B.
__________________
My fancy-schmancy gallery:
http://snowcountryphotography.com

My RFF Gallery:
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/phot...user=1453&sl=m
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #22
CameraQuest
Head Bartender
 
CameraQuest is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: over the hills from Malibu
Posts: 5,686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
Iíve been on a nostalgia kick for a few years inexpensively picking up cameras I either used to own (Nikon F, Pentax MX) or always wanted (Nikon FM2A and F5.) One camera I always admired back in the day but never owned was the Canon New F-1 (not the earlier all mechanical F-1 or F-1n.) I use these cameras sparingly, but nevertheless enjoy them.

The New F-1 was an interesting competitor to the F3 back in the 80s. I was all Nikon and Leica at the time, but one stringer from another paper had a pair of them. I thought they were pretty neat, too bad they were Canons. ;-)

I just fell into a AE Motor FN and AA battery pack for a song, so I think Iím going to keep an eye out for a clean New F-1 with the AE prism and one or two lenses. Is there anything I should watch out for? Who is the repair guru for Canons of this era in the case I want a CLA?
The new F1 has more features compared the old mechanical F1, notably a lot more metering pattern options. However from a 2018 perspective, those improved features no longer look like such a big deal.

Of the two, I greatly prefer the feel and handling of the original all mechanical all metal F1. If you want more advanced FD system features, my choice hands down is the amazing T90.

Stephen
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #23
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
A T90 is on my short list, too - but it seems finding a decent specimen may be difficult. They don’t appear to be aging well (especially the LCDs), and many of the ones I’ve seen for sale were ridden hard and put up wet.
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #24
Fixcinater
Never enough smoky peat
 
Fixcinater is offline
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Portales, NM, USA
Posts: 542
I have a brassy '84 Olympics F1N, had a nicer condition plain F1N but sold that as I'm a nerd about the LA Olympics memorabilia. Also have a really lightly used F1n. They both feel nice, hard to say which is "better," mostly down to your preferences.

I don't use the slow speeds much, so running the F1N without batteries does pretty much what I need it to. Came with a plain prism, I bought an AE finder separately and sold it off. I prefer using the F1N with the grip, especially if I'm using one of my heavier lenses, just fits my fairly large hands better that way.

As for lenses, I've been extremely impressed with the 24/2. Had a 35/2.8 for a while, quite nice but I had too many 35s including a nice SMC Takumar I can use on the Canons with the factory adapter (also use that with an 85/1.8 Takumar). The 50/1.4 is excellent of course, I've seen some sample variation so just make sure to shoot with what you pick up and confirm it works for how critical you may be of slides/scans/prints/whatever you are doing with it. Depending on your use, you may want to look at the Tamron Adaptall-2 line up, I have a 300/2.8 that was half price compared to the Canon 300/2.8L and works fine for my use. I'm sure the FD is a better lens but I don't have the budget for it. I'll swap it out for the white lens eventually. You can also get into some very long lenses for relatively cheap with this system, the old FL 400/600/800mm lenses with their focusing mount works just fine. I luckily happened onto the 1200mm f/11 lens head with a focusing mount for dirt cheap on Craigslist, and it's a lot of fun to go and try to use that thing but the shorter lenses would be much more useful.

The VF on the OM4Ti which I had for a bit then sold to a buddy seemed to be a bit brighter but I haven't done a direct A/B comparison with similar lenses so can't say for sure.

Any of them are fun, just buy the best condition you can or wait for the super cheap deals that pop up from time to time.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #25
CameraQuest
Head Bartender
 
CameraQuest is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: over the hills from Malibu
Posts: 5,686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
A T90 is on my short list, too - but it seems finding a decent specimen may be difficult. They donít appear to be aging well (especially the LCDs), and many of the ones Iíve seen for sale were ridden hard and put up wet.
Avoid the ones used hard professionally.

I've had no problem finding nice T90's. The last one with the great T90 flash for just $50 in the RFF classifieds a few years ago. It was just too good to pass up.

Stephen
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #26
airfrogusmc
Registered User
 
airfrogusmc is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 5,484
I still have one of mine. It is a GREAT camera. I like the fact if you don't want automation you don't have to have it unless you add it. This one has hundred of thousands of frames and only one break down since the early 80s when it was new.
My Canon F-1 (decades of solid use)



A trio of well used cameras. Hundreds of thousands of frames through each


The new F-1 has a plain ground glass spot meter focusing screen.

I think that the new F-1 is the finest camera Canon ever made. They were real tanks....
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #27
farlymac
PF McFarland
 
farlymac's Avatar
 
farlymac is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 6,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
A T90 is on my short list, too - but it seems finding a decent specimen may be difficult. They donít appear to be aging well (especially the LCDs), and many of the ones Iíve seen for sale were ridden hard and put up wet.

I preferred the T70. I couldn't get the T90 to do what it was supposed to do on a consistent basis.


PF
__________________
Waiting for the light
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #28
back alley
IMAGES
 
back alley's Avatar
 
back alley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: true north strong & free
Posts: 49,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
A T90 is on my short list, too - but it seems finding a decent specimen may be difficult. They donít appear to be aging well (especially the LCDs), and many of the ones Iíve seen for sale were ridden hard and put up wet.
i have a t90 that you can have...pretty good shape but i have never used it.
p.m. me if you want to talk about it.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-02-2018   #29
raid
Dad Photographer
 
raid's Avatar
 
raid is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 30,371
For many years I depended on two T90s and two F1Ns along with one F1n for very long exposures requiring mirror lock up.
Once, a F1N got splashed with sea water , which required a clean up job for $200 or less. Once, one T90 got the EEE error. It may have cost $125 to get it fixed.
__________________
- Raid

________________
Top 12 Images;

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/rffg...n.php?cid=7007

http://raid.smugmug.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #30
jajong
Registered User
 
jajong is offline
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Holland
Posts: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
Yeah, but Canon really chose just about the most byzantine way possible to implement the different meter patterns. It also made the focusing screens expensive because they were quite complex in design and construction, and the spot screens today are rare and expensive.




Probably because they didn't know how to fix the problem. Not every camera tech is competent, and that is a fairly obscure problem. I wish I had that repair manual, I'd have fixed mine!
It is the Maximum Aperture Correction Pin (the big wart on the FD mount) that is the cause of possible misalignment of the aperture lollipop read-out. The problem is that you can file off material, but adding material to the "wart" will be difficult. have a look at the attached jpg.
Cheers,
Jan
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Canonrepair FD part 1.jpg (28.6 KB, 18 views)
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #31
ChrisPlatt
Thread Killer
 
ChrisPlatt's Avatar
 
ChrisPlatt is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Queens NYC
Age: 58
Posts: 2,800
My first 35mm SLRs were Canons. Those non-locking "breech lock" lenses caused many a close call !
A locking bayonet lens mount is one of many reasons I later switched to Nikons and Nikkor lenses.

I don't know if my reaction time and hands are fast enough now to prevent disaster.
The FDn lenses seem like a better choice for my recently acquired Canon EF camera.

The Canon EF is a very solid body with many nice features, from the same era as the F-1.
Best of all it has a bridge circuit and can use modern 1.5V silver cells to power the meter.

Lately I too have been looking at these Canon professional models.
When the right F-1n comes along I may buy...

Chris
__________________
Bring back the latent image!
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #32
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
Thanks, Joe - PM sent.

A lot of Canon lovers here! I’ll probably have to store the New F-1 separately from the Nikons so we don’t have any fights in the camera cabinet. I know the F-1 and F-1n are more interesting to most people, but the New F-1 is the one that always intrigued me.
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #33
Mackinaw
Think Different
 
Mackinaw is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
Posts: 3,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
.....A lot of Canon lovers here! Iíll probably have to store the New F-1 separately from the Nikons so we donít have any fights in the camera cabinet. I know the F-1 and F-1n are more interesting to most people, but the New F-1 is the one that always intrigued me.
I have a Nikon F, and F2, and a Canon F-1 and F-1n. I use them all, depending on my whims. And they all live happily in the same cabinet. After years of bickering, they've long ago put aside their differences and are now good friends.

Jim B.
__________________
My fancy-schmancy gallery:
http://snowcountryphotography.com

My RFF Gallery:
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/phot...user=1453&sl=m
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #34
dogberryjr
[Pithy phrase]
 
dogberryjr's Avatar
 
dogberryjr is offline
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Appalachia, USA
Posts: 1,162
In 1986, I wanted an F1 so badlyi could taste it, but I settled for a T70. It served me well, still does, in fact, but that desire for an F1 never abated. Twenty years later I finally bought one and it was everything I hoped it would be. I don't shoot with it very often these days, but every time I pick it up, I'm in love all over again.

TL/DR: Get one.
__________________
M, LTM, FD, F, Film, Digital, MF . . . Jack of all, master of none.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #35
Uncle Bill
Registered User
 
Uncle Bill's Avatar
 
Uncle Bill is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oakville (somewhere west of Toronto) Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,049
I own multiple Nikon F and F2, and a pair of F3 bodies along with a pair of Canon New F-1's (one with the AE prism). They are both great systems and I pick either for critical projects.
__________________
Leica M3 and M4-2, Canon P. Medium Format: Rolleicord IV, Rolleicord Vb, Mamiya C220f kit, Rolleiflex Series E 3.5 Planar version 1, Type 3 Rolleiflex 3.5 Planar F TLR<a
http://flickr.com/photos/funwithcameras
http://funwithcameras.blogspot.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #36
raid
Dad Photographer
 
raid's Avatar
 
raid is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 30,371
Even if you get the basic FN finder, setting the camera to A gives you aperture priority.
__________________
- Raid

________________
Top 12 Images;

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/rffg...n.php?cid=7007

http://raid.smugmug.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #37
brennanphotoguy
Registered User
 
brennanphotoguy's Avatar
 
brennanphotoguy is offline
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Nashville, TN
Age: 29
Posts: 934
I have an F-1 (older, mechanical version) and absolutely love it. I really like the way Canon FD lenses render color. Portra through FD lenses is my favorite way to shoot color film. I’m also a huge fan of all mechanical bodies. The camera itself, like others have said, feels like a big brick. I really only want to add 2 more lenses to round out my SLR kit. I’ve got the little 50/1.8 which I wouldn’t mind replacing with the 50/1.4 but I also want to get a 20/2.8 and the 100/2.
__________________
M3 / IIIg / Rollei 3.5E3
www.instagram.com/brennan_mckissick
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #38
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
Quote:
Originally Posted by raid View Post
Even if you get the basic FN finder, setting the camera to A gives you aperture priority.
Are you sure about that? It runs counter to what Iíve been reading.
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #39
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 43
Posts: 8,890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ford View Post
Are you sure about that? It runs counter to what Iíve been reading.



Raid is right. I had an F-1 with both the standard finder and the AE finder and Aperture Priority worked with both when the shutter dial was set to A. What you lost with the standard finder was a readout of the shutter speed the camera was going to use in Auto mode. Only the AE finder has a shutter speed scale with a needle that points to the speed the camera is going to use.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2018   #40
Ken Ford
Refuses to suffer fools
 
Ken Ford's Avatar
 
Ken Ford is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Suburban Chicago, IL USA
Age: 56
Posts: 3,030
That’s wild! Basically emulates a Pentax MV-1 but without the traffic light. Lol.
__________________
"If you can control yourself and just loathe us quietly from a distance then by all means stay." - Joe

Leica: M-P Typ 240 - M6 - Leicavit M - RapidWinder - Motor M - 21 Super-Elmar - 28 Ultron - 35 Summicron ASPH - 40 Summicron - 75 APO-Summicron ASPH - 75 Summarit-M - 75 Color-Heliar - 90 Elmar-C
Nikon RF: S2 - S3 2000 - 35/2.5 - 50/2 - 50/1.4 Millennium - 105/2.5 - 135/3.4
X-Pro2, X-M1, X100s, NEX-7, dp0 Quattro, N1V1, N1V2, oodles of other stuff
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 23:24.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.