Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Leicas and other Leica Mount Cameras > Leica M Film Cameras

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Tactics for photographing in the rain - with a rangefinder
Old 04-10-2017   #1
dugrant153
Registered User
 
dugrant153 is offline
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 106
Tactics for photographing in the rain - with a rangefinder

Looking for tips on how best to photograph in the rain with our lovely Leicas and other rangefinder cameras. Usually I use an SLR and cover it and the lens with a bag, leaving a small hole so I can see through the viewfinder. However, as rangefinders need access to the two windows, I find it not practical to use a bag to cover it...

I've used a large umbrella but sometimes the rains change direction and, as it's by my side, it usually gets a gust of wind and rain before I can realize it.
Another option I've considered is wearing the cameras under a jacket and thus keeping me and the cameras dry until I need to shoot.

Would appreciate any other advice.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #2
BLKRCAT
99% Film
 
BLKRCAT's Avatar
 
BLKRCAT is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,771
M5 fits under a coat when hung sideways. I've done it from time to time.
__________________
TumblrYoutube
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #3
Phil_F_NM
Camera hacker
 
Phil_F_NM's Avatar
 
Phil_F_NM is offline
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Age: 43
Posts: 4,002
I use a Nikonos V. The IVa is a great camera as well but with a little less manual function. These days the Nikonos series are extraordinarily inexpensive. No worries with the rain using a dedicated diving camera with a great 35mm lens.

Phil Forrest
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #4
ChrisPlatt
Thread Killer
 
ChrisPlatt's Avatar
 
ChrisPlatt is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Queens NYC
Age: 58
Posts: 2,843
I second the suggestion of a Nikonos V. With 35/2.5 Nikkor lens under $200.

Chris
__________________
Bring back the latent image!
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #5
:: Mark
Registered User
 
:: Mark is offline
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Barcelona
Posts: 215
Use an umbrella and shoot one-handed :-)



(M7 with C-Sonnar and Delta 100 in heavy rain)
__________________
Mark
PhotoBlog
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #6
JHutchins
Registered User
 
JHutchins's Avatar
 
JHutchins is offline
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Juneau, Alaska
Posts: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
Looking for tips on how best to photograph in the rain with our lovely Leicas and other rangefinder cameras. Usually I use an SLR and cover it and the lens with a bag, leaving a small hole so I can see through the viewfinder. However, as rangefinders need access to the two windows, I find it not practical to use a bag to cover it...

I've used a large umbrella but sometimes the rains change direction and, as it's by my side, it usually gets a gust of wind and rain before I can realize it.
Another option I've considered is wearing the cameras under a jacket and thus keeping me and the cameras dry until I need to shoot.

Would appreciate any other advice.

My suggestions:

1) Avoid camera bags. Waterproof things are barriers to the passage of moisture. As long as you keep them closed, they're ok at keeping water out when it's out but they always suck at letting water out when it's in. The inside of your bag gets damp and stays damp and that's a ****ty environment for your camera.

2) Keep it under your coat. I put my camera over my shoulder or across my body then put my coat on. It's easy and it works well and lets air move around your camera so even if it does get a little wet it dries efficiently.

3) When you get home, leave the camera out in the open in a room with good air circulation to dry. The best friend to a wet camera is moving air.

4) Don't be afraid to use it. Rain is fresh water and the film Leicas at least don't have incredibly complicated electronic systems to worry about. They can take a little rain.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #7
presspass
filmshooter
 
presspass is offline
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,226
Leica Ms seem to work fine in the rain. I've had mine out in downpours and, with an occasional wipe with a cloth diaper, kept most of the rain off the camera and lens. Obviously, they're not made to be left out in heavy rain for hours on end, but if you can keep them under a coat, in a pocket, or otherwise shielded when not shooting, they'll be fine. Another solution is a cheap shower cap like the ones in motel bathrooms. The elastic allows you to keep the camera dry, take the cap off when you want to shoot, and then put it back on - dry side in, of course.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #8
css9450
Registered User
 
css9450's Avatar
 
css9450 is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,971
Umbrella, with camera under jacket as needed.

Its awkward to shoot while holding the umbrella, so it becomes a bit of a juggling act sometimes. My classic rangefinders don't have lightmeters, so I'm carrying a Gossen meter around my neck too. Truth be told, I suspect its less well-sealed against rain than the cameras are. So far so good. But there's good shots to be had in the rain (and snow!) so you do what you have to do.
__________________
Nikon S2, S3, F, F2, F3, FM2, FA, N90S, D80, D7000, D750, Sony a6000, Canon IIf, Leica CL, Tower type 3, Zorki 4, Vito B, Perkeo II, Rollei 35....
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #9
Ko.Fe.
Kostya Fedot
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Posts: 7,488
I purchased once EOS 3 to use in combination with weather sealed 50L lens. And... I never used it under rain. I have for few years Konica-off Road and used it under rain only once. Getting front filter wet constantly, which is affecting photography wasn't worth it.
If you really have to, get non collapsible lens with deep unvented hood and have filter on the lens and at least two micro fiber towels in the bag.

I have zero interest in getting my Leica cameras wet now. If it rains, I look at Winogrand, Bresson, Zimbel and Kolář photo books with images taken with Leica. Hardly any photo taken under rain...
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #10
narsuitus
Registered User
 
narsuitus's Avatar
 
narsuitus is online now
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,276
When I need to shoot in the rain, I rely on my waterproof watertight Nikonos III.


Nikonos III by Narsuitus, on Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #11
slantface
Jordan Dickinson
 
slantface is offline
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Age: 37
Posts: 636


Also, here's a YouTube DIY video of a similar setup
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UvPYUih08I

Sorry, these probably aren't helpful and pretty ridiculous, but still, seems loosely practical in this particular instance.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #12
Ranchu
-
 
Ranchu is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,695
Definately keep it under a jacket. I wish I knew how to get my Nikonos II open to clean the hazy finder.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #13
tunalegs
Pretended Artist
 
tunalegs's Avatar
 
tunalegs is offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 2,584
Sometimes it's too hot to wear a jacket. Use an ever-ready case then. Just flip it open when taking a picture and flip it closed when done.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #14
Colin Corneau
Colin Corneau
 
Colin Corneau is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winnipeg MB Canada
Posts: 972
If it's raining heavily enough to submerge your Leica, I can't imagine you'd see much to photograph anyway.

If you can see well enough to photograph, it's really not wet enough outside to do any damage if you take simple basic precautions (keep under your coat when not shooting, jury rig a simple cover, etc.)
__________________
www.reservedatalltimes.com

"Viva Film Renaissance"
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #15
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
If it's raining heavily enough to submerge your Leica, I can't imagine you'd see much to photograph anyway.

If you can see well enough to photograph, it's really not wet enough outside to do any damage if you take simple basic precautions (keep under your coat when not shooting, jury rig a simple cover, etc.)
Dear Colin,

True. But "simple basic precautions" seem to be beyond the intellectual reach of the more precious among Leica users.

In the monsoons in India, I've found a cycle cape to be ideal for protecting the camera when I'm not using it. When I am using it, it takes its chances. And survives.

Cheers,

R.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #16
ktmrider
Registered User
 
ktmrider is offline
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: el paso, texas
Age: 66
Posts: 1,187
Move to the desert if you are worried about getting a camera wet or buy a Nikonos.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #17
B-9
Devin Bro
 
B-9's Avatar
 
B-9 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,273
Plastic shopping bags and gaffers tap.

Poke the appropriate holes and tape, works best if you have a filter attached.

Ive done this to camera from a Leica M4-2 to a Fuji 645Zi

The Nikonos is a good in retrospect, but what if it begins to rain and you forgot your heavy underwater kit?
__________________
Made in Michigan

RangefinderGuy @ Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #18
narsuitus
Registered User
 
narsuitus's Avatar
 
narsuitus is online now
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by B-9 View Post
The Nikonos is a good in retrospect, but what if it begins to rain and you forgot your heavy underwater kit?
If I have forgotten the Nikonos, then I have also forgotten the plastic shopping bags and gaffers tap.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #19
giganova
Registered User
 
giganova is offline
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLKRCAT View Post
M5 fits under a coat when hung sideways. I've done it from time to time.
M4 fits inside my car and I make pictures through the windshield. I've done it from time to time.

  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #20
Colin Corneau
Colin Corneau
 
Colin Corneau is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winnipeg MB Canada
Posts: 972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Dear Colin,

True. But "simple basic precautions" seem to be beyond the intellectual reach of the more precious among Leica users.

In the monsoons in India, I've found a cycle cape to be ideal for protecting the camera when I'm not using it. When I am using it, it takes its chances. And survives.

Cheers,

R.
Thanks for a good laugh, Roger, and a tip if I'm ever in an Indian monsoon! (one never knows...)
__________________
www.reservedatalltimes.com

"Viva Film Renaissance"
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-10-2017   #21
mdwsta4
Matty Westside
 
mdwsta4's Avatar
 
mdwsta4 is offline
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 464
Or, you know, just shoot...




One shot from that roll
__________________
Matt
My Instagram Photos

Leica MP
Hasselblad 500 CM
Fujifilm TX-1

Fujifilm X100F
Fujifilm X-Pro 2
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-11-2017   #22
:: Mark
Registered User
 
:: Mark is offline
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Barcelona
Posts: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by slantface View Post
Brilliant! And somehow it seems strangely in keeping with the rangefinder ethos of weird and clunky add-ons... ;-)

To those advocating shooting without protection in the rain, I am not sure that I would be very happy to have an expensive, unsealed lens drenched in water for any length of time.
__________________
Mark
PhotoBlog
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-11-2017   #23
Ranchu
-
 
Ranchu is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,695
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-11-2017   #24
oculus
Registered User
 
oculus is offline
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdwsta4 View Post
Or, you know, just shoot...
Yes, Exactly.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-11-2017   #25
Huss
Registered User
 
Huss is offline
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Venice, CA
Posts: 7,804
Pancake lens, slip it under your jacket. Zone focus.

  Reply With Quote

Options:
Old 04-18-2017   #26
dugrant153
Registered User
 
dugrant153 is offline
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 106
Options:

Options:

Nikonos – Not very practical for me as I need the accuracy of the rangefinder for the work I do (I tend to shoot close to wide open). Would be cool if I went scuba diving though!

Umbrella and one-handed – This was my original approach and perhaps I need an umbrella chest strap or something but I can’t use both hands on the Leica rangefinder to focus and shoot (I’ve tried using my pinky to grab the focusing tab while also straddling the winder and the shutter button but… that was more finger gymnastics than I needed). I could pre-focus but my distance guessing kind of sucks … and DOF is usually really thin at F2.0 and below.

Camera bag – noting that water would be trapped if I did this but currently I keep my Leicas in pouches close to my body with flaps to cover them. However, every time I opened my pouch, I’d be letting water in… unless I had an umbrella on me… but now I have one hand on the umbrella……..

Under the Jacket – This sort of works. I don’t have cameras on straps anymore due to shoulder issues, which of course complicates matters. Wouldn’t my body heat plus moisture cause condensation issues?
Ever-Ready Case – Tried this and it has come in very handy. Adds bulk to the rangefinder but does the job. I have to fumble to take the front covering off but once I do, I’m ready to go usually.

Move to the desert - …. Ummm….

Plastic shopping bags and gaffers tap - Guess you’d have to poke two holes for the rangefinder windows, eh? This would be my preferred method but didn’t think I could practically put on a shopping bag on a rangefinder (although works well for SLR).

These questions all stem from a recent assignment I had covering a parade that began to experience rain. In practice , I took my chances and let my Leica and Fuji get rained on. They were OK for the most part (I kept it close to my body, tucked under my arm) but had to take time to dry them out with silicon packets and a dry box when I got home.
If it’s monsoon rain, like in SE Asia, I’d probably be under some cover rather than venture out into nature's bathtub. Chances are I’d quit from being all wet before my camera does. Thankfully the film Leicas are more mechanical as that helps alleviate my fears or shorting something.

I'm still not entirely sure of what I'm going to do yet. That tiny camera umbrella seems like a good idea though. I think the ideal would be some sort of umbrella chest strap to keep my umbrella tight against my body, which would leave both my hands available for operating and storing the cameras.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-18-2017   #27
ruby.monkey
Registered User
 
ruby.monkey is offline
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: The Garden of England
Age: 49
Posts: 4,587
Nubrella has you covered.

Looking daft is the new cool.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-18-2017   #28
Richard G
Registered User
 
Richard G's Avatar
 
Richard G is offline
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 37,47 S
Posts: 5,229
I do this a lot. The issue with light rain is that it may not stay light. I use a rain jacket and have the camera around my neck and it slides inside the coat. But I'll take an umbrella too. I should say, the umbrella. Melbourne is very windy. I have had English umbrellas for thirty years that have a thick wooden shaft continuous with the handle. These are great in strong winds. This sort of umbrella also allows much better control of the umbrella with one hand on the shaft at the same time as holding the camera. Thin metal shafts are no purchase on the whole umbrella, and are dangerous to people nearby. If I'm out without the rain jacket, then I just hold the camera high under the canopy, chin level, strap around my wrist as the strap can't be made very short. In Michael Markey's avatar you'll see he has a very short neck strap: I'm sure rain is the reason.
__________________
Richard
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-18-2017   #29
pyeh
Registered User
 
pyeh is offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Taylor Square
Age: 59
Posts: 601
You can get rain jackets designed especially for photographers, by companies like Manfrotto and Cooph. They have a huge pockets for your gear (as it were) and a giant extendable visor built into the hood that extends out over your camera when you're shooting. They are pretty dorky though.
The Cooph jacket even has a big zip in the side so you can reach in and grab your camera if it's slung under the coat.
__________________
Peter
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-19-2017   #30
GarageBoy
Registered User
 
GarageBoy is offline
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 773
Those who just shoot with no protection over the camera - hope you don't get haze, corrosion, and lens fungus

As tough as Leicas are - they're not sealed at all - it's still a precision instrument (that's why you bought it) and requires care - like a surveyor's total station - meant to be tough enough to survive job sites, but doesn't mean you should drop it into mud

I like the ziploc with holes cut in method
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-19-2017   #31
Rob-F
Likes Leicas
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Age: 78
Posts: 6,099
I stand under an awning, or shoot through a window.
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 15:02.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.