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Are street photography images inherently more interesting because of locale?
Old 05-25-2014   #1
kxl
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Are street photography images inherently more interesting because of locale?

I like environmental portraiture and I hold the opinion that those taken in 'exotic' locales (e.g., Shanghai, China) are just more interesting ***TO ME*** than those taken where I live (Southern California).

Everything else (exposure, composition, focus, etc...) being equal, do you personally find street photos to be inherently more interesting because of the locale?

Just curious.
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Old 05-25-2014   #2
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Dear Keith,

(1) Exotic locales always interest me more.

(2) There are simply more people on the street almost anywhere than in Southern California, which is another advantage. Admittedly I've never been to Brasilia.

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Old 05-25-2014   #3
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Keith, I think street photography is a great. Personally, i think you can always find a good subject on any street, wherever you are, whether it be a building, an event, or people in general
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agreed
Old 05-25-2014   #4
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agreed

I think foreign places are easier to photograph. They do not necessarily need to be exotic (in my opinion).

I neven managed to take reasonable pictures in my home town.

I don't know why this is so; I guess one is accustomed to everything. I moved away and I find it somewhat easier, coming back "home", but in my new home town, tourists find interesting things at every corner, but I don't.

I try to learn but it is tough.
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Old 05-25-2014   #5
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The street photos that I like, I always like because of the humans in them. To me it's not about location.
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Old 05-25-2014   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
(2) There are simply more people on the street almost anywhere than in Southern California, which is another advantage.
R.
Roger - that is a good point. Since the car culture is so prevalent in SoCal, the opportunities for street photography are a lot less pervasive that NYC or Cairo or Shanghai or indeed many other places in the world.
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Old 05-25-2014   #7
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You're used to seeing your surroundings, so you take them for granted, it means things don't pop out at you like they might if you weren't so familiar with them.

Happens to pretty much all of us, we look at what's familiar differently, on a surface level. When we're outside of the familiar, we look in a much more in depth way.
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Old 05-25-2014   #8
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When I'm somewhere new I tend to pay a different kind of attention than when I'm in familiar places. Some parts of large cities are very particular, and have a majority of similar looking people (Canary Wharf and business attire for example). It can be an interesting exercise to work from this basis. Very often, locale has very little to do with why the photo is interesting, suggesting that other elements may be more important. I also enjoy looking for different ways to photograph recognisable subjects - a fun challenge.

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Old 05-25-2014   #9
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The thing is, people in Shanghai will think the exact opposite , that their humid crowded city is boring, and South California is the place for street photographers...

But I agree that some places are simply very interesting for street work, Hong Kong for one for its vibrant night life, and I'd say Paris and Amsterdam for the architecture.
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Old 05-25-2014   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kxl View Post
Roger - that is a good point. Since the car culture is so prevalent in SoCal, the opportunities for street photography are a lot less pervasive that NYC or Cairo or Shanghai or indeed many other places in the world.
Despite this, I have a fascination with photographing older (around here, early postwar) suburbs. I guess for me that is an exotic locale--strange architecture and the lack of people. Though certainly more challenging to be unobtrusive.

Good points all around here; a good photo is a good photo, but I'm certainly more attracted to seeing pictures of places I haven't' seen before or in a long time. Sometimes that means that my older photos take on new meaning when the setting has change appreciably—I just found a box of old negatives of the South Lake Union area circa 2006, when it was all boarded up warehouses and parking lots.
When it comes to shooting, poking around somewhere new is always since you're seeing everything, from the people to the sidewalks for the first time. Doesn't always make for good photos since its tempting to photograph EVERYTHING, but it sure is fun.
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Old 05-25-2014   #11
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I find that street photography is like fine wine, it gets better with age. I enjoy seeing how people lived in past times especially when the photos are from my childhood era (from the 40s onwards)
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Old 05-25-2014   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greyelm View Post
I find that street photography is like fine wine, it gets better with age. I enjoy seeing how people lived in past times especially when the photos are from my childhood era (from the 40s onwards)
Yes, absolutely.

I was browsing through Vivian Maier's photographs and couldn't help thinking that not much has changed since then, except for maybe the hats, the cars and the cell phones.
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Old 05-25-2014   #13
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Having lived in SoCal for many years, I agree that it really isn't the best place for street photography. For the most part, everything is so spread out, and people just don't seem to hangout on the street much, other than at tourist-dense locations. Unlike densely populated cities like NYC or Hong Kong where you can continue walking for miles and everywhere you look will still be occupied by people, I think shooting in SoCal requires a lot of planning in advance, and it's not easy to just switch location impromtu because chances are that other good locations are far away and you'll most like be stuck in traffic. Being in SoCal definitely changed the way I shoot, and I guess it's great to learn how to adapt to different environment.

Having said that though, there were photographers like Gary Winogrand who shot mostly in Los Angeles and still consistently produced amazing images over many many years.
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Old 05-25-2014   #14
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For me, photos can certainly be more interesting based on locale, but that locale may not be exotic.

I saw some photos of a friday night in Swansea (UK), drunken revellers etc. I grew up in the UK, and lived for a long time in Wales, so Swansea is not exotic to me. The bleakness of the scenes made the photos quite compelling though.

Some street photos are interesting because they are from 50 years ago or whatever, we're seeing a scene which no longer exists. Similarly photographs from a distant locale might be an insight into something we don't know much about, or may not exist for much longer.

But really it depends what you're trying to do, locale may matter, it may not.
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Old 05-25-2014   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greyelm View Post
I find that street photography is like fine wine, it gets better with age. I enjoy seeing how people lived in past times especially when the photos are from my childhood era (from the 40s onwards)
Voltaire once noted that people admire and value things that are physically far away or far away in the past. He also remarked that the latter is generally perceived as even more valuable, since people can travel across physical distances but not through time.

I have ~500 rolls of cheap film I shot as a kid and young student in Beijing and Northern China in the 90s, and looking at the sheets is quite an experience - a flashback to a simpler, less electronic age.
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Old 05-25-2014   #16
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I love the streets and I can't say it any better than Meyerowitz says it in this trailer for a good movie which if you haven't seen you should. Just push play.
http://www.traileraddict.com/everybody-street/trailer
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Old 05-25-2014   #17
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not really. the geographical locations of my street photo books are spread out all over the place.
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Old 05-25-2014   #18
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There was a thread about pictures from your own street, I thought that was very interesting even though it might be mundane to photographer.
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Old 05-25-2014   #19
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Nope.
NA isn't the same big shopping mall yet, surrounded with dump of high-rise condos, where streets are boring and same.
Frisco is different from Big Apple. Montreal and Toronto are different in good street photography.

Yes.
Different countries are different due to the obvious difference in cultures. Street is reflection of it. It just more obvious, I guess.

I'm as interested in those faraway places street life pictures as in close to my town Toronto streets photos.
But I wasn't same place boy for long time, before we settled in the GTA burb.
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Old 05-25-2014   #20
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For me it's more about the human element than location. Location filled with people helps a bunch I admit for good street photography.
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Old 05-25-2014   #21
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I tend to search out relationship like foreground/background visual relationships. Repeating shapes. Relating things in reflections and shadow to the subject or foreground. It's trying to see those relationships and capturing those things in a fraction of a second that keeps me going put as often as possible. It's always new and never the same. You make a right turn and you see nothing all day. You turn left and you can't stop going from one moment to the next. It's that unpredictable chaos and the motivation to try and make some visual sense out of those moments that I love about it.
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Old 05-25-2014   #22
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I think the exotic can be a trap, maybe we're just attracted to novelty.
If I lived in a denser/different city, my excitement and output would probably plateau after a few years living there.

I wonder whether one can "exhaust" the scene in one's hometown, whether my city isn't too fit for this kind of exercise (density, weather, light) or am I just being photographically lazy.
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Old 05-25-2014   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauffray View Post
I think the exotic can be a trap, maybe we're just attracted to novelty.
I'm a walking dead who need new stimulations to feel alive :0

Frankly, if the happening and drama is considered equal for sake of the discussion, foreign places (or even just B&W, because I live my daily life in full colour) can look far more interesting with less effort. Even shots in the same city looks more interesting if it's taken in places rarely visited.
For the same reason I always give negative "balancing points" when considering to like or not street photo taken abroad in local photography community's Facebook groups. Doesn't feel fair for the local shots without it
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Old 05-25-2014   #24
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Quote:
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I think the exotic can be a trap, maybe we're just attracted to novelty.
If I lived in a denser/different city, my excitement and output would probably plateau after a few years living there.

I wonder whether one can "exhaust" the scene in one's hometown, whether my city isn't too fit for this kind of exercise (density, weather, light) or am I just being photographically lazy.
I think it depends on what you're doing.

If you're shooting for your own entertainment, then shooting in the same place all the time, I can't imagine how that could not get a bit boring.

If you're shooting to sell your work, only your customers can tell you if you've exhausted it really.

If you're focusing on people, then you're unlikely to run out of people, even in a small town.

If you're focusing scenes where people are just part of the scene, might start to get a bit old.

If you're being lazy or just commited to one type of photography, only you can know that really. I do think that laziness is more common than commitment and hard work though, but maybe that's just my misanthropy showing through.
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Old 05-25-2014   #25
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For me, I actually prefer street photographs from places I'm more familiar with because I can understand the context of the photograph within its geographical construct better. I also prefer it because "exotic" street photography feels a bit cliche sometimes, depending on where we're talking about, and because there really isn't much Canadian street photography out there, so it's a nice surprise to find.

So yes, in a way, a photo can be made more interesting because of the locale, but overall, good street photography is good street photography, whether it is from Encino or Bangkok.
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Old 05-26-2014   #26
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Somewhere else may be fascinating and beautiful and that's why you went there.

Somewhere else is different and you pay more attention.

Somewhere else is not home. You are not on call, can't drive your son to football or be late for a meeting.

Many European cities have very narrow streets and following Capa's advice to get in close is not hard.

Somewhere else may have lots of others with cameras so your path is smoothed, somewhat.

If you are tall with blond hair amongst smaller dark haired people of a different race, you then will be noticed, and may be constantly approached to buy things or be measured for a suit. That does rather kill street photography. My one small camera in the hand relaxed lope was useless for blending in under these circumstances.

But I prefer shooting near home and work and my favourite street in my city.
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Old 05-26-2014   #27
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More interesting is not an absolute: people perceive or feel differently.
In my case I don't care at all about the place, but about feelings... Those can be equally found in the nearest street I perfectly know, or in distant, exotic, unknown places to me.
I don't feel travelling can help for better street photography. And I enjoy travelling.
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Old 05-26-2014   #28
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Good point Juan. But the emotion is sometimes heightened by the new, or the beautiful. Or there can be an initial and potentially unrelieved frustration. I am no longer thinking of street photography per se. A new place is sometimes overwhelming, untameable. I am knocked off balance. When I find my bearings and take the sort of shot that is particular to my long standing habits and see similar sorts of things to what interests me at home, then I have a a feeling of relief. I feel that I have acquired some balance, that I have gone past the superficial of the new place.
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Old 06-09-2014   #29
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As I look through my flickr contacts and groups, I notice that I tend to favour countries like Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan and China. I've traveled to Hong Kong on several occasions and China and Japan once, and I just love the scenery, the streets, the landscapes and the 'look' of those places. Street photography from those countries appeals to me a lot more than from Western places. Nor am I particularly interested in Southeast Asian places like Thailand et al, or the Indian region, or wherever. I just seem to visually prefer Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan and China, particularly for street.
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Old 06-09-2014   #30
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If you have preconceived notions on what street photography is and what it should be, then you will search for that type of street photography. If your location does not match your preconceived notion, then you will be disappointed. However, if you keep an open mind, you will find something to photograph wherever you may be. If you are in Antarctica, you probably shouldn't be trying to make street photos... but I'm sure there is something else to photograph.
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Old 06-09-2014   #31
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99 percent of street photography is abysmally boring, no matter where it is shot, no matter by whom.

ah, but the 1 percent, no matter where, no matter by whom ...
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Old 06-09-2014   #32
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LoL, foreign places are inherent more appealing, human nature I guess..
My family moved to Shanghai last year, yes it's been great to shoot, no doubt, but I still find it's great to shoot in Philly, to me.

However, now I'm in Houston, couldn't say it's comparable to the above, lol
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Old 06-09-2014   #33
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Thanks for this interesting conversation! I agree with much of what has been said.

I would not call myself a street photographer..but I think the question of the exotic applies to most types of photography. Personally, I like to travel, but my goal is rarely to show photos of a particular place. In fact I guess I strive for a timelessness as well as a placelessness when I shoot....but of course that is rarely possible. Any car, house, road sign, or even certain vegetation can describe a place and time. Most of my best photos have been taken within a mile of places I have lived, and I readily hang them next to photos from different countries. I actually find I have a much more difficut time making good work while traveling partly because I am too distracted by the exotic. I feel that my familiarity with the place I am living actually helps me to understand what is interesting/odd when I see it, and when I am traveling its harder to get past the newness.

All that being said, when I don't provide a location one of the first questions I usually get when someone is looking at my work is "where was this taken?" I like to think there are more interesting questions to ask and that it shouldn't matter...but I understand and answer the best I can.
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Old 06-10-2014   #34
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Try getting some interesting shots inside a shopping mall. Go and photograph your shopping mall and then travel to Cuba or some other exotic location, show the images to people and see which one they like.


Here in Toronto, most people think Queen St. is good for street photography, while in reality Queen St, is just another shopping mall with no roof, but essentially its the same artificial, lifeless and pretentious crap.

If a place does not have layers, history and culture, its photos are going to be boring, because any photographer with a half a brain knows which place has "life" and which place is "dead".

So, location is everything, the lucky street photographers can travel and can find those locations. But unfortunately all locations have been photographed, which means if you're going to Istanbul, don't try to fake Alex Webb.
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Old 06-10-2014   #35
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Hmmmm... In my experience, people making statements like that just haven't looked closely enough to see what's actually there. Still, when they grow up, they sometimes realise that there's a lot more on their doorstep than they previously noticed.
Internet is full of advice, and full of wisdom. Almost everyone "knows" what is the right thing to do. There is no shortage of people to second guess others and offer clever alternatives and different points of view.

But the fact is that those people are good at giving advice on the internet, if they actually had engaged reality in real life, they'd never tell someone else what to do.

A good photographer never tells someone else what to photograph, he can only speak about what he cannot photograph.
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Old 06-10-2014   #36
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Keith, I think street photography is a great. Personally, i think you can always find a good subject on any street, wherever you are, whether it be a building, an event, or people in general

I agree. I also think the more "exotic" locations may hold more interest for us simply because we're not there and we wish we were. Just my 2¢
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Old 06-10-2014   #37
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. . . A good photographer never tells someone else what to photograph, he can only speak about what he cannot photograph.
Eh? Not even saying, for example, that Sankt Petersburg is a pretty amazing place to photograph?

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Old 06-10-2014   #38
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Geography does matter when it comes to street photography, in my opinion.

I consider myself geographically challenged but I realise that it may mean that I would have to work significantly harder to get a more interesting image than those in more exotic (in the loosest sense of the word) locales.

Shooting in somewhere like Hong Kong or Shinjuku does not guarantee fantastic pictures, however they arguably provide a richer palette from which to draw inspiration. Perhaps less so for people who live there, perhaps?

You can take photos of buskers, people who sell balloons, people on their mobiles, the homeless, street performers, people carrying shopping and the back of peoples head (I have been guilty of all of these) absolutely anywhere, but if you want to push yourself, to shoot something other than what are essentially street clichés, then it certainly helps to be in a location that potentially offers more and is more alien to more people.







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