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Cameras in the Movies / TV / Media If you are a photographer, it's difficult not to appreciate movies too. In this forum you can discuss movies, as well as the cameras used in them. What camera used in what film / TV show etc has long been a topic of discussion at RFF. Whether the Exakta and 400mm Kilfitt lens in Hitchcock's Rear Window or the Nikons in Eastwood's Bridges of Madison County, cameras are tools which reflect the time and technology of the film.

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Old 09-18-2013   #41
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Many great mentions, lets not forget Cardiff's masterpieces: Black Narcissus and The Red Shoes...
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Old 09-18-2013   #42
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For superb use of light, anything by Michael Mann I think.

Also, Drive is excellent for night photography.

Agree with Lost in Translation too.
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Old 09-18-2013   #43
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I'm not sure this classify but I always felt "Kes" is a good example of certain RFish pictures:

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV...640_SY512_.jpg

Also "climb dance" a short documentary about Ari Vatanen racing at Pike Peak:

http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-...ikes_peak1.jpg

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Old 09-18-2013   #44
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Federico Fellini's 'Roma'. The scene of the Papal fashion show. So wonderfully Lit and composed. It absorbed me into the film.
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Old 09-18-2013   #45
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Man on Fire by Tony Scott with Denzel Washington.
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Old 09-18-2013   #46
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Anton Corbijn's "Control" from 2007 really impressed me with it's cinematography. Apparently shot with color stock and printed to B/W, Corbijn is notable for being the photographer for many of U2's albums.
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Old 09-18-2013   #47
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Blade Runner, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Barry Lyndon, and A Clockwork Orange.
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Old 09-18-2013   #48
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Last King Of Scotland and the incredibly effective switching between 35mm and Super 16mm formats. Loved it!
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Old 09-18-2013   #49
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I think the b&w cinematography in Spielberg's "Schindler's List" is magnificent.
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Old 09-18-2013   #50
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One of my favorites is 'Out of the Past' by Nicholas Musuraca, and a great one for scenes of New York is called 'The Naked City' by William Daniels. And, though its not a great movie, 'Arrowsmith' (1931) has some amazing shots in it.
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Old 09-18-2013   #51
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German Expressionism of the 1920's & Italian Neo-Realism of the post 2nd World War era for B&W photography. The former spent enormous effort in lighting for affect while the later used natural light.
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Old 09-18-2013   #52
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Oh, almost forgot: Fritz Lang's "M".
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Old 09-18-2013   #53
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Two films that haven't been mentioned:
The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951, cinematographer - Leo Tover)
A Man for All Seasons (1966, cinematographer - Ted Moore)

Also the beautifully filmed Lawrence of Arabia (1962, cinematographer - F. A. Young)
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Old 09-18-2013   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redisburning View Post
some fantastic films mentioned, and I was pleasantly surprised to see The Seventh Seal and The Twilight Samurai, two of my favorites. Blade Runner too, but that wasn't a surprise.

I'd like to call attention to director Masaki Kobayashi's films, especially Harakiri. it is an UNBELIEVABLY well shot film.

I'm personally a fan of Nicholas Winding Refn's movies and Only God Forgives really outdid itself IMO. Valhalla Rising is a tough act to follow from a visual standpoint!

I'm surprised to not see mention of the 3 big epics (Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, Bridge Over the River Kwai), maybe I missed them? Lawrence is my favorite both visually and as a film.

It might be cheating but many Japanese animated films are great. I'd give the nod to Tenshi no Tamago, Kanashimi no Belladonna and Ghost in the Shell. More cheating is the TV show Kaiba, but if it were a movie it might be at the top of my list!

but probably my favorite film of all time excluding two of the ones in my last little paragraph is Alien. The cinematography really plays up Gieger's transcendent aesthetic work. While I think photographically this film is a bit weaker than some of the others I've mentioned, the overall visual effect of this film is so strong that I feel it deserves mention.

Twilight Samurai
. Glad to find another afficianado. Isn't it just great! Its kind of melancholy and sad but beautiful. And the attention to detail.......wow!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9l-NlkGBWPc

http://www.totalfilm.com/reviews/cin...ilight-samurai

The other two movies in Yoji Yamadas great samurai trilogy are "Hidden Blade" and "Love and Honour" All are excellent but Twilight is the best. All involve similar themes about low cast samurai defending women who have been used and abused. Men of honour who live the real values of a samurai in a time when all that was dying away. If you have not seen the other two movies seek them out as well. The third in the trilogy, Love and Honour I place well behind the other two but its still worth watching. All are made with the same wonderfull attention to detail that immerses you in the world of a late Edo Period samurai and the same melancholy style - sadness for a time passing and love lost etc.
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Notorious. Sunset Boulevard. Pale Rider
Old 09-18-2013   #55
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Notorious. Sunset Boulevard. Pale Rider

Hitchcock used to mentally walk-through every single camera-placement, camera-angle in every frame, every movie. Sunset Boulevard? a bit self-consciously so, but a movie within a movie, about movies. In color: Pale Rider, Reservoir Dogs.

B&W: most of the early-middle Charlie Chan movies. Yes, film noir, more noir than blanc, and in an era when even the audiences had developed an "eye' for the "eye". Some of the other 'tec flicks were good as well - Double Indemnity?

Until the late Sixties cinematographers preferred to work in B&W - the color dyes of the day weren't good for much beyond bright costumes & huge scenery. Black and white emulsions were "more realistic" because they had better spectral response.
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Old 09-18-2013   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterm1 View Post

Twilight Samurai
. Glad to find another afficianado. Isn't it just great! Its kind of melancholy and sad but beautiful. And the attention to detail.......wow!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9l-NlkGBWPc

http://www.totalfilm.com/reviews/cin...ilight-samurai
No lose to check out all the movies by the same director, a living legend, Yamada Yoji/ 山田洋次 movies...Yellow Handkerchief, Love and honor/武士の一分, and all his Tora San (Otoko wa Tsurai yo) movies..
Mr. Kimura/ 木村拓哉 in 'Love and Honer' '武士の一分', is also Nikon D600, D800, D7100 spokes person...
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Old 09-18-2013   #57
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To my mind the best examples of cinematography, by which I mean films where the visuals are most effectively used as integral parts of the overall experience, are The Third Man (B&W) and Lawrence of Arabia (color). Both visually stunning in their own right, but so effective in enhancing the feeling of the respective storylines.
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Old 09-18-2013   #58
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How about "Russian Ark", 90 minutes, 1 take - amazing.
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Old 09-18-2013   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSU
Manhattan, Easy Rider, The Shining, Psycho, Battleship Potemkin, Amelie, Barry Lyndon, (Paris, Texas), Days of Heaven, Stagecoach (1939),

there are more but this is what comes to mind right now.

Others come to mind for great computer effects and other computer generated imagery, and as much as I like Blade Runner, I feel too much of it is computer generated, and not actual cinematography.
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapejohnson View Post
it was 1982, they barely had CGI in that movie if any. they used a lot of models. it's an amazing movie.
I love the movie Blade Runner, as well as Philip K. Dick's book: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?.

As you state, it was not an example of CGI and more so of model making. I stand by my point, regardless of specifics, that a movie with that much content originating in a model shop or done against a green screen is not in the same class as those I mentioned in my list.
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Old 09-18-2013   #60
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Another not yet mentioned:

John Frankenheimer's 1966 production: Grand Prix, done in Cinerama. I recall a Ford GT 40 was used as a camera car.
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Old 09-18-2013   #61
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Some picks for my personal favorites list:

William Mellor for The Diary of Anne Frank

Harry Stradling Sr. for My Fair lady

Harry Stradling Jr. for Little Big Man

James Wong Howe for The Old Man and the Sea

James Wong Howe for Picnic

David Watkin for Out of Africa

Freddie Francis for The French Lieutenant's Woman

Leon Shamroy for South Pacific

Leon Shamroy for The King and I

Lionel Lindon for Around the World in 80 Days

Harry E. Squire for This is Cinerama

Joseph Ruttenberg for Gigi

Dan Mindel for Spy Game

Robby Muller for Paris, Texas

Michael Ballhaus for Postcards From the Edge

Freddie Young for Doctor Zhivago

Freddie Young for Lawrence of Arabia

OK, I'll stop now.
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Old 09-24-2013   #62
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In addition to many already mentioned, I'd add: Zardoz, Stardust, and The Farmer Astronaut.
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Old 09-24-2013   #63
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A few more to add to the list:
"Northfork" (by Polish brothers)
Most of Leone's work ("Il buono, il bruto il cativo" is my favorite)
Days of Heaven was already mentioned, but I also liked cinematography very much in "Thin Red Line".
Anybody mentioned "Wings of Desire" of Wim Wenders?
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Old 09-24-2013   #64
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"Citizen Kane" Gregg Toland, ASC

"Knife in The Water", early Roman Polanski b&w
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Old 09-25-2013   #65
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A touch of Evil Director Orson Welles Director of photography Russel Metty, ASC (Better than the third man imo)

M- Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder Director Fritz Lang Director of photography Fritz Arno Wagner

The Grapes of Wrath: Director John Ford Director of photography Gregg Toland, ASC (FSA photography in moving pictures)

Vargtimmen Director Ingmar Bergmann Director of Photography Sven Nykvist, ASC (Beautiful, deep blacks some weird angles)

La Jetée Director and Camera Chris Marker (the question was RF related la jetee is a series of still frames)

Oliver Twist Director David Lean Director of Photography Guy Green, BSC (Beautiful and atmospheric cinematography)

Branded to Kill Director Seijun Suzuki Director of Photography Kazue Nagatsuka (great framing)

Also a fan of Twilight Samurai (love the pace and feel of the movie)

The Conformist Director Bernardo Bertolucci Director of Photography Vittoria Storaro, AIC, ASC (great cinematography and angles)

The last Emperor Director Bernardo Bertolucci Director of Photography Vittoria Storaro, AIC, ASC (great cinematography Storaro practically wrote the guide to colour use in cinematography)

Dracula's Daughter Director Lamber Hillyer Director of Photography George Robinson, ASC (Glamour cinematography for a Horror Movie love it)

Bram Stoker's Dracula Director Francis Ford Coppola Director of Photography Michael Ballhaus, ASC, BVK (One of the most beautifully shot Horror/Romance Movies nice use of colour)

The Godfather Director Francis Ford Coppola Director of Photography Gordon Willis (There is a reason why Gordon Willis is called the prince of darkness great use of colour to show a period)

Battleship Potemkin Director Sergei Eisenstein Director of Photography Eduard Tisse (Every shot a masterpiece)

Solaris Director Andrei Tarkovsky Director of Photography Vadim Yusov (great feel)

Rosemary's Baby Director Roman Polanski Director of Photography William Fraker, ASC (some of the best framing in cinematographic history)

Visually the most beautiful Hitchcock To catch a thief Director of Photography Robert Burks, ASC

Do the right thing Director Spike Lee Director of Photography: Ernest Dickerson, ASC (Again use of color)

and many many more
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Old 09-25-2013   #66
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Any movie directed by the Turkish photographer and director Nuri Bilge Ceylan but my personal favs are three monkeys & once upon a time in Anatolia. With the former, he won the best director award at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival so his movies are available at many dvd rental chains...
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Old 09-26-2013   #67
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Quote:
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Glad to see this film here. The cinematography is amazing. Scorcese and Coppola loved it. I saw it a few months ago on French television. Apparantly, there is a Brazilian documentary (I am Cuba, the Siberian Mammoth (Soy Cuba, O Mamute Siberiano) (2004) on the filming, but I haven't seen it.

From the description in Rotten Tomatoes: And Ebert wrote:

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‘Soy Cuba’ is superb. The propaganda is a tad on the heavy side, even so it doesn’t come close to Kalatozov’s most well-known film ‘The Cranes are Flying’ (once a requirement for your ‘education’ in some places, were you to join the communist party). Also recommended for breathtaking cinematography.

The crane/tracking shot in ‘Soy Cuba’ is only rivaled (maybe) by Welles’ intro in 'Touch of Evil'. Before special effects, long crane shots must had been the cinematographic equivalent of the space race. It was where directors showed their chops. Scorsese definitely used them in his long career, if memory serves there was a pretty obvious homage in 'Gangs of New York'.
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Old 09-26-2013   #68
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Anything Stanley Kubrick made, most notably The Shining and Barry Lyndon. But also 2010 a Space Odyssey and Eyes Wide Shut.

And Fritz Langs Metropolis of course.
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Old 09-26-2013   #69
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Somebody already mentioned Wong Kar Wai (In the Mood for Love, Chinking Express).

But I have not seen references to the Peter Greenaway films that feature Sacha Viery (sp?) as the cinematographer. Breathtaking stuff from the aesthetic point of view.
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Old 09-26-2013   #70
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--Hero
--Crash
--Melancholia
--Anything from Andrei Tarkovsky
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Old 09-26-2013   #71
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Anything shot by Robby Muller. Not just some of Wim Wenders' best work, but Jim Jarmusch'sDown by Law and Dead Man. Glorious modern black and white.
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Old 10-03-2013   #72
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The Set-Up (1949) Dir. Robert Wise
Paper Moon (1973) Dir. Peter Bogdanovich
A Colt is my Passport (1967) (Japanese Western Filmnoir) Dir. Takashi Nomura
The Searches (1956) Dir. John Ford
The Treasure of The Sierra Madre (1948) Dir. John Huston

Check out films by different cinematographers (my favorite DP's): James Wong Howe, Lucien Ballard, Russel Metty, Joseph Walker, Oswald Morris, Jack Cardiff, Conrad Hall, Gordon Willis and Vilmos Zsigmond.
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Old 10-28-2013   #73
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Thanks for all the suggestions. This week I watched Touch of Evil and The Third Man and they were both fantastic. While watching Chinatown today I spotted this camera...a Barnack! Anyone know what model?

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Old 10-28-2013   #74
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The Hustler (starring Paul Newman) a masterpiece in many terms, including photography and the use of B&W.
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Old 10-28-2013   #75
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Polanski's Chinatown.
Bob Fosse's Cabaret.
Fellini's Casanova, Amarcord, Rome.
Scorsese's Taxi Driver
Coppola's Apocalypse Now
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Old 10-28-2013   #76
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"Soy Cuba" has some spectacular infrared scenes
"Lawrence of Arabia" the scene where Omar Sharif rides out of the desert is wonderful
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Old 10-28-2013   #77
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Quote:
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Polanski's Chinatown.
See my post above
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Old 10-28-2013   #78
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The Last Picture Show. As a bonus, you get to see a young Cybill Sheperd naked.
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Old 10-28-2013   #79
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Old 10-28-2013   #80
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Elysium. Hard Eight. Raising Arizona. Children of Men. Brazil.
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