Old 01-19-2017   #81
Calzone
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Now what we have here is a ...Cal Fan Club

robert
Robert,

I have too much personality, I tell you.

But here at work, I work with people that have none. Real flat liners. LOL. People that have negative numbers in regard to personality.

My boss really hates me. LOL. Anyways he is not in my fan club. LOL.

Since I work in a hospital once a month we would go and donate blood. My boss is kinda full of himself, and I caught him out bragging about his perceived good looks, so I cornered a bunch of nurses and asked them directly between my boss and I who is the better looking man.

So pretty much I am like a game show host, and surely the woman had feelings and opinions to express especially under such unusual circumstances that I somehow spon-tain-ly created like the word I just created.

So it became rather funny because it was expressed by not only the majority, but all the women that I was the much better looking man. I started laughing, and the women also, but my boss did not think it funny. LOL.

"I'm so jealose," he said. LOL.

Later when we were donating blood, a nurse tells my boss that his blood pressure is a bit high and that perhaps he should visit his doctor, and my boss yells, "My blood pressure is high because I have to work with him," and my boss points to me. LOL.

Anyways you can't make this stuff up.

BACK ON TOPIC: tonight I can't print because I will be photographing a fashion event.

Cal
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Old 01-19-2017   #82
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Robert,


But here at work, I work with people that have none. Real flat liners. LOL. People that have negative numbers in regard to personality.


Cal
As much as I like to bash Cornell for the colossal mismanagement, I would hardly call the majority of people working there flatliners. Some of the most interesting and entertaining people I've met work there. Maybe you should interact more with the medical school and graduate school
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Old 01-19-2017   #83
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Robert,


But here at work, I work with people that have none. Real flat liners. LOL. People that have negative numbers in regard to personality.


Cal
As much as I like to bash Cornell for the colossal mismanagement, I would hardly call the majority of people working there flatliners. Some of the most interesting and entertaining people I've met work there. Maybe you should interact more with the medical school and graduate school
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Old 01-19-2017   #84
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John,
Why so many views and lurkers? Are people scared of me? LOL.
Speaking only for myself: I find your observations and commentary both informative and entertaining. I'm just getting started in printing (got a 3880 a few months ago and have been learning the ropes on the stock cartridges, and got a matte K7 system running on it not too long ago). Paper and ink is a proud, brave, and sometimes intimidating world coming from the land of screens and pixels. I'm loving it but haven't got anything to share with the world yet -- I don't have those decades of experience to anchor and provide context for all this new stuff.

So I thought I'd share that I'm also enjoying your thread, as it were. :-) I think printing generally and Piezography specifically deserves more press, and I hope to contribute something to that effort as I get up to speed.

Please, carry on!

Cheers,
Jon
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Old 01-19-2017   #85
Calzone
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As much as I like to bash Cornell for the colossal mismanagement, I would hardly call the majority of people working there flatliners. Some of the most interesting and entertaining people I've met work there. Maybe you should interact more with the medical school and graduate school
Pro-Mone,

I was not generalizing nor speaking of the majority: I was specifically speaking of people I work directly with.

Also know that my lab is really like a bunker, built literally on Madhattan bedrock, and since it is a nuclear facility access to normal people that have personalities is rather exclusive and rather limited. In other words I work in a bubble that surely does not totally represent the bigger institution. BTW I actually work with very few people: about a handful.

My boss says, "I come to work for fun." This is no joke. Basically he has no life, no friends, and I don't even think his wife talks with him. Very sad.

Cal
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Old 01-19-2017   #86
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Speaking only for myself: I find your observations and commentary both informative and entertaining. I'm just getting started in printing (got a 3880 a few months ago and have been learning the ropes on the stock cartridges, and got a matte K7 system running on it not too long ago). Paper and ink is a proud, brave, and sometimes intimidating world coming from the land of screens and pixels. I'm loving it but haven't got anything to share with the world yet -- I don't have those decades of experience to anchor and provide context for all this new stuff.

So I thought I'd share that I'm also enjoying your thread, as it were. :-) I think printing generally and Piezography specifically deserves more press, and I hope to contribute something to that effort as I get up to speed.

Please, carry on!

Cheers,
Jon
Jon,

Thanks for joining in. Know that I have been only printing digitally for about two years.

Wow a fellow K7 user. I kinda modified my K7 glossy into a warm neutral shadows to selenium highlight splitone. On the warm papers I like to use I found the warmth to be over the top if I stuck with the recommended 50/50 split at shade 4, so I toned down the warmth further by diluting shade 3 75% WN with 25% SEL.

I think I can get my K7 to closely resemble PP with a new dilution. Now after using Piezography Pro I think I will dilute my shade three further to 33% SEL.

I find in Piezography Pro that establishing a strong neutral midrange as a transition is a nice nuance that creates mucho depth and spreads out the splitone into a wider range of variation. Depending on the image I kinda mostly tweak the warmth, dialing it up, or toning it down depending on the levels of shadow detail.

I like the highlights to pop because they draw in and catch the eye.

Anyways this embedded blog is the result of a creative person forced into a deprivation chamber for 7 1/2 hours a workday with no source of stimultion other than the internet.

A while back I had a friend here at work. His name was Andrez and he was a PhD Radiochemist. Andrez was very smart and he went to the MIT of Poland, was able to work in Germany, spoke Russian, and somehow made it to New York. Anyways we both were armchair economists and loved talking about the markets, but our co-workers and bosses did not like us being friends. Anyways it did not feel like we lived in a free country.

Sadly Andrez was forced into retirement. Here was a truely smart man, and we coped together.

Cal
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Old 01-20-2017   #87
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So at last night's event it really was a MFA exhibition of fashion photographers from the School of Visual Arts. My gal knew one of the grads, and her work stood out against others.

I remarked about the perfect lighting, and she said it was natural lighting. What displayed particular skill is her models were of mixed race. The male was a dark black man, and the woman white. Not an easy exposure to reveal all the texture with all that contrast in the same frame.

Also I could tell she likely made the prints without having to ask. Something kinda special when a shooter prints their own work IMHO. Anyways in Lane's work it seemed her vision was more complete.

It seems obvious the prints I saw printed on metal by another shooter were commercially done, and in other people's work it seemed like generic commercial printing that did not stand out, except for one artist who seemed to bleed the pigments on a color print to resemble a watercolor painting that was soften and blurred by some wet-on-wet technic.

So I found this water color like printing engaging and beautiful, especially one image that resembled a dancer perhaps painted impressionistically like a Degas painting. The original shot was sparse, almost like a painting that was a incomplete work, or a work in progress. In this fashion the print displayed elegence and it really was the wind blowing the billowy dress that suggested a dance movement.

Because I went to art school in the seventies, and because I use to be a painter, I did my forensics to investigate how this printing was performed so I could steal it. But to be humble and not to be blamed for stealing I will call this technic "the JonB Method" so he is the fall guy. The only thing I need is the fact that everyone now knows that JonB is a K-7 matte printer as evidenced by his public post above. Here at RFF everything you say can and will be used against you. LOL.

In this age of fake news and promotion of bad information all I need is one piece of true information to set the hook into a gullible general public, and then I can always blame the internet for the reposting of bad information until the truth and blame can be put upon poor JonB who is the vick-tum of my criminal behavior. Now everyone knows by JonB's post that he is a K7 printer... Anyways that is my hook.

So now back on topic. The prints paper was smooth, which suggested a glossy paper. Upon further inspection I kinda recognize perhaps a Baryta coated paper, and along the left hand border I saw the forensic evidence of some form of masking.

My guess without lab analysis is likely masking tape that has its tack removed an appropriate amount by taping the masking tape a number of times to some cloth. I witnessed some fine thin lines of seeping that perhaps only a printer with a trained eye might notice, but I hold this lack of perfection against the artist and call him/her sloppy. Perhaps the evidence suggests the artist did not draw the tape tight and somehow ink seeped under perhaps a wrinkle. BTW the possible wrinkle was in the middle of a rather large print that suggests perhaps the artist might be of only average height.

So I believe masking was used to maintain the hard edge between the print image and the border. Basically the fun part would be misting water to basically to destroy/blur/soften the image to create an abstraction.

Anyways this print was in a color print, but I imagine it would look more like an Asian pen and ink drawing performed by a Sumi brush and India ink.

So now all you need to remember it is called the "JonB Method" and know it is JonB's fault for the inspiration for my stealing. "All I'm trying to do is mind my own business..." LOL. Remember this is the "JonB Method" and JonB stole this technic...

Cal
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Old 01-20-2017   #88
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Did you do your forensic work in your own "mind palace"?
F,

That's really funny because I'm kinda dumb. Always stood out as a rather strange and odd kid though. If anything my identity is of a lazy slacker, a clever kid who basically likely disappointed mucho people.

My poor dad. It seems parents love the most the kid they really should hate, and I was a rotten kid. Took me decades to figure out that I put him though hell with constant worry, and it was after his death that I kinda figured out out of 5 kids I was his favorite. LOL.

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Old 01-20-2017   #89
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SMUT: A friend of mine reports that rewetting OEM Epsion inks and K7 do not run as I have described, and this is from a guy who worked in a real print shop and collaborated with artists.

It was suggested using alcohol on a still wet print. I have done this with alcohol preps to clean up borders that suffered headstrikes. The smudgy effect is perhaps what I was seeing? Anyways perhaps some solvent when the print is still wet?

So now the forensics are pointing to wet-on-wet technics before a print dries. Perhaps I was being a bit harsh when I called the artist sloppy due to the seepage.

Could what I believed was a area of seepage be a headstrike? But this was in the middle of the print and on the left edge.

Oh-Well another artistic dill-Lou-sion. This sometime happens to me. Now I'm disturbed. How were those images made? LOL.
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Old 01-20-2017   #90
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MORE SMUT: I checked the Private Forum, so a new development that is not available to the general public is that there has been a release of new master curves for x800, x880, x890, and x900 printers.

Anyways I know of two people who will be happy they bought refurbished 3880's.

These curves are not for PP and are for normal Piezography, but know that these new curves offer a choice of blacks: Piezography Photo Black (formerly WN1); new Piezography PK HD (originally only sold for Pro ink purchases but available soon for every Piezography customer); and the new UltraHD-MK ink.

So in my case these curves offer (I have been holding off on buying more WN1 knowing new darker blacks and curves were coming) a blacker black that will cut down on ink usage, offer better gloss differential control, have higher dMax (with both WN1 and PK HD), and better dot placement.

The UltraHD-MK master curves will also work with normal Piezography MK (Neutral 1) and will actually increase that ink's printed dMax slightly.

Basically these new curves will work with ink you alreay have, and will work with new UltraHD-MK and PK-HD inks if you decide to upgrade for your traditional Piezography printer. For me that is K7.

Anyways mucho thanks to Walker. Lucky me is that I already have that blacker-black PK-HD from my Pro inkset. Now I have that added contrast and broader tonal range in K7. Mucho good.

Cal
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Old 01-20-2017   #91
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Hm. I might want to play with the JonB method at some point, novel as it is to me. Three ideas come to mind: pre-wetting the paper; using the largest possible platen gap; and designing a curve to ink the page so wet out of the printer that you can use it as an offset plate to make the final print, perhaps with multiple iterations that include direct printing to achieve plausible density in the shadows.

Ooo. UltraHD-MK sounds interesting. Admittedly, I'm only getting started with Piezography -- I completed a single print before heading overseas, and I'm not home yet -- so I'm quite happy with K7 as it is. But, having a potential upgrade once I run through my initial tanks is a tantalizing prospect.

Printing is fun.

Cheers,
Jon
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Old 01-23-2017   #92
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Hm. I might want to play with the JonB method at some point, novel as it is to me. Three ideas come to mind: pre-wetting the paper; using the largest possible platen gap; and designing a curve to ink the page so wet out of the printer that you can use it as an offset plate to make the final print, perhaps with multiple iterations that include direct printing to achieve plausible density in the shadows.

Ooo. UltraHD-MK sounds interesting. Admittedly, I'm only getting started with Piezography -- I completed a single print before heading overseas, and I'm not home yet -- so I'm quite happy with K7 as it is. But, having a potential upgrade once I run through my initial tanks is a tantalizing prospect.

Printing is fun.

Cheers,
Jon
Jon,

Thanks for sharing some creative possibilities. It seems like the painter in me is getting curious about matte papers.

I feel lucky in that I already have that dark black from PP that can serve my K7.

Cal
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Old 01-23-2017   #93
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So I printed a file I knew would be a ringer for a great print with PP. My first print I felt was a bit too warm, so I toned it down and expanded the use of the neutral sliders. It seems via contrast more micro details gets revealed and in my second print the image seems and appears sharper, more detailed and has a 3-D pop.

Anyways the image is of an abandoned Domino Sugar refinery that stretches for eight blocks along the East River with Madhattan in the background. I used the pedestrian walkway on the Williamsburg Bridge to get an ariel panoramic view, and know that by the cason there was an opening that is now blocked off by a chain link fence where I use to be able to climb a railing and hang over to get my shot over a drop to South 5th Street below that is about a 100 feet.

Someone must of seen me take this shot again and again over the years and reported seeing someone doing something rather foolish, dumb or dangerous, so now the shot with my 28 Cron is blocked.

In my shot the clouds are pronounced due to the use of a yellow filter on my Monochrom. A small building on South 3rd Street dates back to the 1800's, use to be a burlap bag factory for back in the day when men manually loaded and unloaded ships with hooks held in their hands. In that brick building was a loft that I lived in way before Williamsburg was conquered by hipsters.

The main building of the abandoned refinery looms large and in my print I see the faint traces of the lightning rods on the chimeney even though it is a quarter a mile away. This print is from an amazing file that will print mighty big. The level of detail looks like a tripod shot taken with a large format camera say with Tri-X. Anyways the IQ is that good. Not very often you get a file this great, even if you shoot a lot.

So now this shot is somewhat historical. The area is changed and much of the Sugar Refinery already has been dismantled as part of a big redevelopment project. When I lived in the Southside of Williamsburg the refinery was actually working, and know that sugar refineries are known to explode, and I lived basically right next to a gigantic bomb factory half a block away.

The air sometimes smelled like cotton candy, other times like burnt newsprint, but the air was heavy, dirty and not likely healthy to breath, but know that this location one day is destine to be the next "Dumbo" and is being redeveloped by the same developer (Two Trees).

Anyways I am a gentrifier who repeatedly gets displaced again and again so I knew the importance of taking that shot again and again over the years to record what I knew would be destroyed. Likely some of the tallest buildings in Brooklyn will be built there.

Cal
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Old 01-25-2017   #94
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So I am restraining myself from loading the 7800 to print big. I can't afford to binge like I did last year, but I already know that my K7 has new curves, and that I can use the new darker black from Piezography Pro with my K7 and basically have a K7 on steroids.

I learned from using Piezography Pro that I will likely tone down the warmth of my K7 further by diluting my Shade 3 warn neutral to 33% Selenium to produce a broader midrange neutral. In effect I want my K7 to resemble my PP in that, in addition to having the blackest black, I will have more of a range of tones between the highlights, mids, and shadows.

I expect to see an increase in resolution, as Walker mentioned that these new curves have better ink dot placement. So all this is brutal knowing I have a Porsche in the garage, but I have to wait for better weather.

So let me run with the car analogy for a bit. Know like any performance car that you should expect a bit more maintenance. Currently I run an expensive humidifier set to 60% humidity to ensure that dry heated air does not promote clogged nozzles. I also now use my printer more or less every other day.

Sunday I had to top off my Gloss Chroma Optimizer. So now I learned that this has to get topped up every week. When I check my levels I remove my carts individually and give them a gentle shake to keep the pigment in solution and prevent settling.

Generally once a month I clean my capping station and my wiper. Using q-Tips and Piezoflush I wipe the collected sludge of dried inks off the wiper blade, and I make small pads of sections of paper towels to dab off Piezoflush that I drip onto the capping station. The idea is to remove any dried ink that will compromise the capping station from sealing, and get rid of any dried ink deposits.

So why all this extra work? This maintenance prevents clogging your print head and wasting paper and ink. I likely do it more than I need to, but I sometimes use my printer so much it might be called abuse, so babying it makes up for all those times of severe duty. Paper lint is another problem... Anyways when you discover banding or sputtered ink on a print due to a partial clog it is too late.

So now I'm at a point where I know what PP can do, and I am impressed by my results. The new level of control in the driver is highly engineered, but I find that I can get by without constant fideling with the settings for each print. All prints look good, and depending on settings I do like some prints better than others.

It seems that when optimized I can get a print to pop, become more detailed, and have a 3-D depth that gets maximized. The bad is that this requires using a print to gauge results. Know that my 27 inch Eizo dimmed down to 80 Lux in a darken room cannot reveal all the shadow detail that is in a print.

I can see that the new PP curves ("canned" curves) are so sharp that on a good portion of my K7 Tiffs I have to go back and lower contrast and or clarity because they are a bit overdone. The effect is too HDR like and over the top. Know that because I shoot a Leica Monochrom that I never adjust sharpening, and I use only the default setting of 25 that is used in LR5.

So like owning a Porsche is Piezography for you? I once had the opportunity to go for a ride in a borrowed Porsche 911 Turbo wide-body convertible in triple black. The experience was more like flying rather than driving, as my friend, a very big guy used all of his strength to steer the car through a cloverleaf accelerating to 90 mph in third gear.

Basically we put about a week's worth of driving in about 40 minutes. Wound up the car to 135 mph, which did not seem fast, and my friend tested the ABS as we came upon Babylon town Hall on Sunrise Highway.

So printing is at this level of exhileration, where you can safely go over the top without hurting anyone, and learn the performance envelope of what one can do.

More later.

Cal
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Old 01-26-2017   #95
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I am an old analog B&W film die-hard who only went digital when I bought my Leica Monochrom 4 years ago. Along the way I have still been shooting 135 and 120, and prior to owning the Monochrom I shot as much film as possible, when rebranded Tri-X cost $2.89 a roll, and rebranded close dated Acros could be had for $1.89 a roll.

For one spring and summer I averaged 150 rolls of film a month, and every month I would process all this film. I know I annoyed many people because I had a total disregard to editing and printing, but I knew that time is the best editor, and that the days of inexpensive film would not continue forever. So now I have a couple of hundred thousand images to cull though...

So now with Piezography Pro and one pass printing, along with my SL I have a large amount of work to do. Of course I won't print everything, but I will do the down and dirty of digitizing selected images and print half 8 1/2x11's to kinda make index card sized prints using PP. The one pass printing will likely take 2-3 minutes.

Digitizing 35mm via Nikon slide copier or Beoon should be easy, because I can tether my SL with LR6. The idea is to have a collection of small prints to collect and assemble some organization out of this massive mess I created. I'll avoid the 120 at this point because the 135 alone is painful enough. On each negative file I have the date developed so cronologically at least I can establish a timeline, frame numbers will help, and I have mindful data on development used and other comments to create a filing system on the back of each print.

Anyways I have a mess that likely will not go away. LOL. Anyways PP allows me to tackle a monumental task that likely will lead me to setting up a Nikon LS-8000 that I secured with Vuescan to move beyond this initial down and dirty.

Cal
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Old 01-26-2017   #96
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One of the Lurkers.

So I found that I also have that position now of shooting but not printing. I have the idea of moving out, so no settling, which doesn't push desires to get stacks of prints. Being young it is time to grow and shoot with some editing and batch printing. Prints, even small, are jewels.

Ironically the 120 is the one I kind of endure scanning because of the frames/roll. But am select with it, even if the Texas Leicas do allow 35mm esque shooting.
The other day I recalled your slacker's brew and thought that if I lived in a city I'd get to shoot monochrome way more.

Piezography intrigued me when I discovered the concept though I do not have the B&Wness to think about it much now.

I have this MD da vinci friend that finally ended telling me to try exhibiting and publishing, it is not a purpose I have now. But printed material is the definite end and so lovely.
I sourced a lab with great rates for C-Prints, decent for bulkier and proofing. The thing is I don't quite know what to do with (large) prints after. Did a few 12x18s and these are stored. I hold up on sending people 12x18s at the moment 😂 and no "real estate riches" aspirations here. But large prints are amazing indeed, I did get some ideas from seeing some huge museum classical paintings.

Prepared some selects to get 8x12s soon(tm) and my PC crapped out with the files in, maybe one of these days I'll reselect and print.
Oh, and classify the bunch I already have around home.

Time makes time though, each thing will arrive as suited.


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Old 01-27-2017   #97
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One of the Lurkers.

So I found that I also have that position now of shooting but not printing. I have the idea of moving out, so no settling, which doesn't push desires to get stacks of prints. Being young it is time to grow and shoot with some editing and batch printing. Prints, even small, are jewels.

Ironically the 120 is the one I kind of endure scanning because of the frames/roll. But am select with it, even if the Texas Leicas do allow 35mm esque shooting.
The other day I recalled your slacker's brew and thought that if I lived in a city I'd get to shoot monochrome way more.

Piezography intrigued me when I discovered the concept though I do not have the B&Wness to think about it much now.

I have this MD da vinci friend that finally ended telling me to try exhibiting and publishing, it is not a purpose I have now. But printed material is the definite end and so lovely.
I sourced a lab with great rates for C-Prints, decent for bulkier and proofing. The thing is I don't quite know what to do with (large) prints after. Did a few 12x18s and these are stored. I hold up on sending people 12x18s at the moment 😂 and no "real estate riches" aspirations here. But large prints are amazing indeed, I did get some ideas from seeing some huge museum classical paintings.

Prepared some selects to get 8x12s soon(tm) and my PC crapped out with the files in, maybe one of these days I'll reselect and print.
Oh, and classify the bunch I already have around home.

Time makes time though, each thing will arrive as suited.


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Jorde,

I don't think you can go wrong shooting as much film as you can. I believe to be good one has to shoot a lot, and if one shoots crazy amounts of film eventually comes both consistency and style.

I found that nailing the fundamentals of exposure and self processing created a great foundation for the next step which was shooting and maximizing image capture with the Leica Monochrom which I say is the most unforgiving camera one can ever shoot.

If you try to optimize image capture, Monochrom exposure must be precise, and blowing the highlights in this camera is the most unforgiving due to the sensor and not having a Bayer Filter Array to allow recovery. Once gone:gone forever. The M246 with it's CMOS sensor is more forgiving, but not the original MM.

My model for printing is kinda like the housing bubble in that if I print a lot and print big some rich guy will buy my prints. LOL. So far no one is buying my prints, but I did do a show last year, printed another artist's work for exhibition in Hong Kong, and had the honor of giving a symposium at ICP.

Know that this year I will likely give a second symposium at ICP involving my printing and Piezography.

I do believe at this point the prints speak for themselves, and it is a matter of time before someone influential sees or discovers my work.

Having a pile of negatives in the wings that needs to be edited, proofed and printed is a great place to be to have follow through. Kinda like sitting on a stockpile of ammo, but I will tell you if you just concentrate on making negatives with a total disregard to printing expect people not to understand, thinking you are crazy, and it will annoy mucho people.

As an artist I have learned the best way to be an artist is to be kinda anti-social because if you want to stand out you don't want to be doing what other people are doing. Basically if you are provoking and annoying people with odd behavior they don't understand it is a good thing. LOL.

Anyways I pissed off mucho people over the years. All it had to do is make sense to me, and disregarding other peoples forceful opinions and ignoring their imposed thinking surely will piss a lot of people who will scream at you, "I wanna see prints." LOL.

No one saw my wisdom in shooting film when I could get unlimited supplies of rebranded Tri-X for $2.89 a roll; or when I loaded up the truck with rebranded Acros at $1.89 a roll that was close dated. Anyways I was so crazy that today I still have some of that unexposed film in my freezer, and I have about 100 rolls of film in my fridge that needs processing.

Anyways, now, today people don't think I'm so crazy, but the best time to have done all this film shooting was when film was dirt cheap. I can't afford to shoot Tri-X at $5.00 a roll like I use to.

Cal
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Old 01-27-2017   #98
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...
My model for printing is kinda like the housing bubble in that if I print a lot and print big some rich guy will buy my prints. LOL. So far no one is buying my prints, but I did do a show last year, printed another artist's work for exhibition in Hong Kong, and had the honor of giving a symposium at ICP.
Hi Cal, with your model in mind do you print in numbered signed edition or unlimited prints? Or what? Of course I think numbered edition are more worthy.
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Old 01-27-2017   #99
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Hi Cal, with your model in mind do you print in numbered signed edition or unlimited prints? Or what? Of course I think numbered edition are more worthy.
robert
Robert,

So far I consider everything I have done either test prints (experiments) or unsigned artist proofs, even the monster prints that I printed for exhibition.

The delusional artist in me, LOL, makes me to ultimately believe that the most valuable prints I can make would be limited edition silver wet prints contact printed via Piezography digital negatives in a vacuum frame. These would be kinda easy to make if I had the vacuum frame and studio space because the technology I already have in PP. I would also like to experiment and develop to the point where I might print on Kodak AZO for that broad tonal range of a silver chloride paper.

I would like to perhaps/maybe keep the Piezography prints an open edition, where my artist proofs might have value added, by being early renditions. Anyways it is a clever way for me to get away and bury my evolutionary process and for all the variables I explored.

Also I heard of one printer that developed pricing that increased in some kinda formula as the number of prints created increased. Early adopters/collectors got the cheap price and as the numbers increased the prices were manipulated higher by further price increases.

My guess is an open edition printed in this pricing format would self limit, but also would be a twist on supply/demand economics as we know them, where scarcity is created by price and not the other way around. I think this is a cool model to follow: modest pricing in the beginning and a steepening price as more prints are sold to contain dilution of value.

Currently I am adding an element of hand made to all my prints made this year since I am actively writing useful information to document the print on the reverse. Also the workbook I am assembling I think will be very valuable one day due to all the notes, remarks, and information that is hand written by me. I think these early experimental prints that are basically developmental tests might be valuable to me now to further my work, but kinda important if anything big possibly happens. Of course I'm being delusional because the odds are against me.

So in the end I really only do it for me. If I die in obscurity I'm OK with that. My life has meaning to me, and I did not waste it. Call me selfish, but perhaps I only intend on pleasing myself, and I'm OK with that. I already have a good life, I don't need fame or accalaides to feel self worth because I have had a life of achievement already. To become wealthy would only add security. Truely if I won the lottery, I wouldn't really have much of a different life. I'd likely just add a 9880 and be in heaven.

I know if I make a 4x6 foot print of the Columbus Circle trick mirror image shot that the print because of the subject matter and because it is panoramic that a displayed framed print of this size would be very much like adding a rather large window to any room. The same for the iconic shot of the historic Domino Sugar Refinery that is mostly gone. It is for images like these that I could use a 44 inch wide printer. Even if it was just printing for me.

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Old 01-27-2017   #100
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Jorde,

I don't think you can go wrong shooting as much film as you can. I believe to be good one has to shoot a lot, and if one shoots crazy amounts of film eventually comes both consistency and style.

I found that nailing the fundamentals of exposure and self processing created a great foundation for the next step which was shooting and maximizing image capture with the Leica Monochrom which I say is the most unforgiving camera one can ever shoot.
(...)

Know that this year I will likely give a second symposium at ICP involving my printing and Piezography.
(...)
As an artist I have learned the best way to be an artist is to be kinda anti-social because if you want to stand out you don't want to be doing what other people are doing. Basically if you are provoking and annoying people with odd behavior they don't understand it is a good thing. LOL.

Anyways I pissed off mucho people over the years. All it had to do is make sense to me, and disregarding other peoples forceful opinions and ignoring their imposed thinking surely will piss a lot of people who will scream at you, "I wanna see prints." LOL.

Anyways, now, today people don't think I'm so crazy, but the best time to have done all this film shooting was when film was dirt cheap. I can't afford to shoot Tri-X at $5.00 a roll like I use to.

Cal
Yes, Yes, Yes!
I've always been wary of others, easy to flock around and all. Go on my own often (though the occasional meetup abroad is really nice!).
I kind of became a mentor to this friend who is getting into photo and soon after there is the other friend of a friend who is luring him towards the studio just for the girls. Well, kids shooting to be cool and look nice just another 1000 do on Instagram.

I do like film but also find that cannot shoot mucho because it is $$, would ramp up with more $$ coming in. Learnt on film being crazy thoughtful and selective with digital on the side doing the quantity and experiments. Hell I learnt a lot about photo when trying to do some meaningful shooting on the last year of Kodachrome, narrow latitude included.

Back as a teen I even geeked about B&W and alt processes, just getting the theory though. Pt/Pd anyone?
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Robert,
(...)

I know if I make a 4x6 foot print of the Columbus Circle trick mirror image shot that the print because of the subject matter and because it is panoramic that a displayed framed print of this size would be very much like adding a rather large window to any room. The same for the iconic shot of the historic Domino Sugar Refinery that is mostly gone. It is for images like these that I could use a 44 inch wide printer. Even if it was just printing for me.

Cal
Totally agree shooting and printing for yourself, one of the gripes I have about is the "Me, narcissist, external validity seeking" zeitgeist -- of my "Millenial-Z" Generation.

Would totally love to attend the ICP symposium (and be in crazy NYC), there's the budget and time thing ofc which probably bounds it. A couple trips elsewhere to shoot would be nice too, long overdue visit to Asia.

"Exporting" your work abroad may be interesting. Last summer I chatted with a painter I know, he found that the Mediterranean portfolio sold nicely to USA, while some European guy commisioned him to paint NYC scenes.

In the fresh out of storage video there was that scene of the ESB from LIC bridge, as you told me, now blocked by the highrises. Has quite a value with time.

Some time in the future if there's a print exchange, sales, or so I frankly would like some NYC scenes!
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Old 01-27-2017   #101
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I just discovered this thread. Totally overwhelmed. I'll be back for more soon, but right now I need to make some decent prints on my 3800. Thanks.
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Old 01-27-2017   #102
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I just discovered this thread. Totally overwhelmed. I'll be back for more soon, but right now I need to make some decent prints on my 3800. Thanks.
Your 3800 is a durable printer. Keep it going. A lot of developments lately in advancing printing.

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Old 01-27-2017   #103
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Also I heard of one printer that developed pricing that increased in some kinda formula as the number of prints created increased. Early adopters/collectors got the cheap price and as the numbers increased the prices were manipulated higher by further price increases.
...
Currently I am adding an element of hand made to all my prints made this year since I am actively writing useful information to document the print on the reverse. Also the workbook I am assembling I think will be very valuable one day due to all the notes, remarks, and information that is hand written by me. I think these early experimental prints that are basically developmental tests might be valuable to me now to further my work, but kinda important if anything big possibly happens. ...
So in the end I really only do it for me.
Lower prices for the firsts prints and increasing them toward the end of the series seems to be a practice done by many photographers...I find it a good idea.

I never thought about adding hand made elements to my prints in form of notes, now you mention it seems something to be tried

Of course doing what we like and value just for ourselves is great thing!

robert
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Old 01-27-2017   #104
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Lower prices for the firsts prints and increasing them toward the end of the series seems to be a practice done by many photographers...I find it a good idea.

I never thought about adding hand made elements to my prints in form of notes, now you mention it seems something to be tried

Of course doing what we like and value just for ourselves is great thing!

robert
Robert,

One of the best things about printing is that I'm the boss. Really gratifying and kinda like seeing an image develop in a tray under safelight, or exciting when one pulls a roll out of a tank to see the IQ in the negatives.
I get the same experience when downloading files, and when I press print.

Basically we create our own universe, not all are welcome, but we build our own bubble.

I don't need a lot to be happy. Printing for me is that good.

Cal
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Old 01-27-2017   #105
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You are correct Cal, isn't printing the nicest thing? is a short piece I wrote time ago...
robert
PS: but I like to print small
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Old 01-30-2017   #106
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You are correct Cal, isn't printing the nicest thing? is a short piece I wrote time ago...
robert
PS: but I like to print small
Robert,

Lately I have been printing 12x18 image size. I actually am liking the smaller prints because they offer the opportunity to be held in the hands for viewing. Anyways for me this is a good part of the experience when viewing prints. I like to position the print in the light, and I also think the smaller prints encourage and invite nosing up to see the fine detail.

But at times I like going crazy, or I'll have some wonderful file that begs to be printed in a monster size because a smaller print will ask, "I wonder what this image would look like printed big."

So yesterday I did something I normally don't do: make a print from a color file. So I quickly learned that it was best to post process a nice color file before converting to greyscale for further post processing/tweaking in B&W.

Anyways I was surprised on how comfortable I felt using my B&W printing skills and applying them to color workflow. I also got the vibe that color files have a bit of different interaction, but it is basically the same thing whether its a Monochrom file or a SL file.

The image was from the Woman's March in NYC on 42d Street, near Grand Central. In the background looms the Christ-Ler Building and the PanAm Building (Met Life). My subject was an American flag on a pole being displayed upside down about 5-6 feet away. There is a sea of people (estimated to be 400K) but their signs are not a distraction and are in the far backgound, but at perhaps 7-8 feet away is this profile of a middle aged balding man that draws the eye to the profile of a NYPD cop, and it is clear to the viewer that these two men are embraced in eye contact.

Anyways it is a compelling shot, but I would have to tell you that it was the Woman's March, meanwhile it has all the landmarks that signify a big protest in NYC even without the street sign that is also in the shot.

So I just want to give a shout out to all those B&W film die-hards because I use to be one of them. I have to tell you the best skill to have is a trained eye for fine detail and long tonal range. For those that have darkroom skills and extensive wet printing experience not a lot of skills is required, and I find the lack of digital skills is more than made up for with a highly trained eye.

Because I know the smoothness of film and wet printing this carries over to my digital prints, and although my Piezography inks and systems offers higher resolution and broader tonal range than wet printing, I'm able to convey in my prints the vibe of medium format film and at times large format.

Don't ever discount your film experience, be greatfull you have it, but know it will emerge in your digital printing. Also want to state that I don't add any sharpening to my images and basically use the default setting in LR5 which is 25. My Monochrom and SL do not have anti-aliasing filters so I find that I don't need sharpening.

Jon Cone promotes the use of Photoshop over LR. His reasoning is that Photoshop is at the pixel level, and Lightroom is more about controling a RAW/DNG file. Since I don't need to sharpen or oversharpen I keep it simple and only need LR. If you shoot a camera that has an anti-aliasing filter... Oh-well.

Also know that I promote myself as a lazy slacker to show that I am clever. LOL. I like using filters so I get the contrast near perfect at time of image capture; I also maximize exposure (shoot to the right) to maximize signal for lower signal to noise; and when I post process it only requires minor tweaking. Basically I try to emulate a large format shooter who is going to contact print.

Know that when shooting film I did the same, and it is those very same fundamentals of maximizing exposure, optimizing my negative, and performing good technic that makes me a good printer, not digital skills which are shamefully little.

Decades ago in art school I learned to be a clever slacker. If I made great negatives, wet printing was easy, and the prints even back in the 70's looked like and resembled medium format even though it was 135. All these decades of film shooting and processing is now paying dividends. People think I have great digital skills, but in my case that is not what makes great digital prints: it is my old analog skills.

How rewarding is discovering one is farther along than one might think. I wonder how different it might be for someone who might not have developed their analog skill set, grew up exclusively in a digital world, and knows little of analog smoothness and rendering to ground them.

Cal
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Old 01-31-2017   #107
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Happiness is a moist print head.

So I highly recommend "The Digital Negative" and "The Digital Print" by Jeff Schewe. What makes these two books so great to learn Lightroom is that Jeff helped develop and consulted with Adobe to make LR what it is.

There are great insights to how and why LR is setup and laid out, and these explainations also explain how the controls interact so much of the mystery is gone.

Last night I worked on the Woman's March print again, but this time not using the exposure control to boost the shadows that were underexposed. I basically used the Shadows slider to boost the shadows. The resulting print did not have the washed out distant buildings and revealed them with more detail, but the flag, the cop and the bald middle aged man got a bit more grittier.

So a third print was made via a balance of a half stop boost in exposure and a more modest boost on the shadows slider.

I tend to ride the contrast control with the exposure control, meaning if I raise or lower exposure the contrast slider gets a cooresponding move so that the slider knob for contrast remains more or less is right under my exposure slider. Under perfect conditions both would be zero if I nail the exposure, but this was not the case with this quick shot, taken in auto, that captured a bright sky in the distance.

So on one hand I was underexposed for the shadows by a full stop, but the best print for the shadows that held the cop, man and flag was a half stop of added exposure and a more modest boost in shadows.

Tonight I will print this image yet again. I need to crush the blacks a little, and add to the whites. For the most part I like to use the tone curve section of LR to boost blacks, whites and contrast, because it is less global and tone specific.

Perhaps I can add a bit of contrast via the Clarity slider, but I don't want to get too crunchy and cross over to HDR.

So it is not that the other prints are bad: they are good prints; but I know I have the controls to do better. This is where I draw the line on printing and fine art printing. The fine art print definitely is further evolved.

Anyways lately I have been busy processing color files under deadlines for work for my gal. I was really surprised how much of my skills from B&W carried over. The understanding that Jeff Schewe's books gave me I think gave me an edge, but know you only have to read one of them and for printers I would recommend "The Digital Print." "The Digital Negative" has a lot of repetition and is basically about RAW files and digital image capture.

These are not how to books, and they provide not only insights from a software designer's POV, but provide a broad understanding to break out of the box like I did above to problem solve in creative ways. BTW I left all the settings in my Print Tool all the same as a control thus far, and I will surely optimize the splitone and blending of the three curves in later iterations, but first I want to spread the contrast and make a blacker black and a whiter white now that I got those shadows developed and where I want them.

Cal
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Old 01-31-2017   #108
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Interesting comments Cal, thanks. For sure the analog darkroom experience, even if limited to B&W is a great help when working a file with PS or LR.

What I'm doing now is very different, I would say the "real opposite" LOL I'm trying to make photo which do not looks like photos (difficult to explain !) so I shoot Polaroid actually Impossible mainly B&W, scan import in LR making minor adjustment (if necessary PS) and than I print only the photo on Hanhemuehle William Turner Paper which is a very textured.

The combination of the "not perfect" Impossible photo and the print on a rough paper gives a look which resembles a charcoal drawing, more or less!

robert
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Old 02-01-2017   #109
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Interesting comments Cal, thanks. For sure the analog darkroom experience, even if limited to B&W is a great help when working a file with PS or LR.

What I'm doing now is very different, I would say the "real opposite" LOL I'm trying to make photo which do not looks like photos (difficult to explain !) so I shoot Polaroid actually Impossible mainly B&W, scan import in LR making minor adjustment (if necessary PS) and than I print only the photo on Hanhemuehle William Turner Paper which is a very textured.

The combination of the "not perfect" Impossible photo and the print on a rough paper gives a look which resembles a charcoal drawing, more or less!

robert
Robert,

Sounds wonderful. I think really creative and exploring abstraction is mighty cool.

I think I want to explore matte papers for creative possibilities. Those prints I saw in Milk Studios that resembled water colors is another inspiration.

I guess what becomes is crossing the boundry where art and photography divide and morph into something new. This is likely probably why I am drawn to Piezography.

One thing I learned from my gal the Fashion Blogger is that if you want to stand out, don't do what everyone else is doing. In this manner Jon Cone's legacy is just all that. When we started shooting I only had my Monochrom as my only digital camera so we shot exclusively only in B&W, and because of this B&W exclusive shooting her blog stood out and ascended rapidly.

BTW last night I did not have the opportunity to print, but I looked at my last print and the passage of time allowed me to evolve and process what I might do to tweak the contrast further. Sometimes great strides require the passage of time and fresh eyes.

Cal
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Old 02-01-2017   #110
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Agree the best thing that happened to me was when a friend pushed me to get into printing. I think it improves your photography in just about every direction, and like you, I like printing as big as I can... at home.

Love seeing someone using Piezography. I've read up on, thought about it, but couldn't
pull the trigger. Upgraded from a Canon Pro 100 that basically I bought for the price of the ink... to an Epson P800 which is very nice. My plan is to stick with the OEM inks while the warranty remains in effect... and after that look to Cone's stuff and the MSI (MIS?) group that distributes both B&W and color for him. They're still working out the P800, but it'll probably happen this year (so they tell me in emails). I've corresponded with Paul Roark who's also into custom ink mixes. We don't have Leica's, but Sony and he's done the Kolarivision mod for Astrophotography to pick up red sensitivity rather than go the Monochrom route. I'm undecided at this point as that's probably a year or more out for me. Yet I've thought and continue to think about the latter as Monochrom's are coming down in price (used). Curious which of the MM's you're running? M9-M or the current model? Also curious whether you've used the MSI/MIS (whichever it is) for color, too. I'm using Imageprint rather than the Quadrip at the moment and while expensive, it does a VERY nice job. Finding Matte papers ain't bad and often just right for B&W, but color is more of a Luster or Satin finish.

There should really be a forum here for printing!!!! that isn't a Yahoo group. "Just sayin'".
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Old 02-01-2017   #111
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Robert,

Sounds wonderful. I think really creative and exploring abstraction is mighty cool.

I think I want to explore matte papers for creative possibilities. Those prints I saw in Milk Studios that resembled water colors is another inspiration.

I guess what becomes is crossing the boundry where art and photography divide and morph into something new. This is likely probably why I am drawn to Piezography.

One thing I learned from my gal the Fashion Blogger is that if you want to stand out, don't do what everyone else is doing. In this manner Jon Cone's legacy is just all that. When we started shooting I only had my Monochrom as my only digital camera so we shot exclusively only in B&W, and because of this B&W exclusive shooting her blog stood out and ascended rapidly.

BTW last night I did not have the opportunity to print, but I looked at my last print and the passage of time allowed me to evolve and process what I might do to tweak the contrast further. Sometimes great strides require the passage of time and fresh eyes.

Cal
Thoroughly agree. Interesting fact about B&W giving the edge to Maggie and the blog, it just takes a while browsing around to see how people cluster around the same aesthetic in respective genres. And many don't go for variety, I really like trying out.

Had an argument with a friend (photo newcomer) who pressures me to instagram. I guess that I reached that point of (not) doing what people do, which throws them off bonkers. So nowadays that is not publishing online instead of printing.
IMO, at the stage I am, that's throwing work off overboard just to have 100 people saying "nice" and throwing virtual hearts.
Just letting time do its own editing, and finding it an excellent way. Some people are really irking.

Really printing is about seeing, thinking and seeing further. How many times in tweaking it first looks perfect, only to retouch a couple more times and end up with many more possibilities. I remember a tip on pinning the print for a week to see further.

Best trying out paper, from what I've seen there are tons of choices (inkjet and alt processes) which on Wet and C-prints aren't, that allows for more interesting combinations.
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Old 02-01-2017   #112
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Thoroughly agree. Interesting fact about B&W giving the edge to Maggie and the blog, it just takes a while browsing around to see how people cluster around the same aesthetic in respective genres. And many don't go for variety, I really like trying out.

Had an argument with a friend (photo newcomer) who pressures me to instagram. I guess that I reached that point of (not) doing what people do, which throws them off bonkers. So nowadays that is not publishing online instead of printing.
IMO, at the stage I am, that's throwing work off overboard just to have 100 people saying "nice" and throwing virtual hearts.
Just letting time do its own editing, and finding it an excellent way. Some people are really irking.

Really printing is about seeing, thinking and seeing further. How many times in tweaking it first looks perfect, only to retouch a couple more times and end up with many more possibilities. I remember a tip on pinning the print for a week to see further.

Best trying out paper, from what I've seen there are tons of choices (inkjet and alt processes) which on Wet and C-prints aren't, that allows for more interesting combinations.
Jorde,

I annoyed people because I shot mucho film when it was inexpensive with a total disregard to printing. My idea was to concentrate on just image capture and making great negatives like practicing deadly Kung-Fu moves. Anyways this deeply disturbed people, and all kinds of arguing resulted. Anyways I stood my ground and now I'm looking like some visionary because I exploited cheap film while it was avalable.

I can't tell you how mastering exposure and development has paid dividends in printing. Basically sloppy technic costs you a lot when one prints.

For my gal's blog basically they get published and lifted by others where most of the time I do not even get photo credit. I understand that once on the Internet one is giving away one's photography for free and one looses control over it. The rewards are the acknowldgements when a photo gets 3K likes within 24 hours, and some shots get 5K likes. Anyways the 3K likes is pretty consistent.

For my own personal work it is more private, and I am glad that we kinda have the beginnings of a support group here in this thread. Printing definitely has made me a better shooter and the eye for fine detail I just can't turn it off. I see mistakes and sloppiness readily in the world like that headstrike in an exhibitition print. WTF???

Cal
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Old 02-01-2017   #113
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Agree the best thing that happened to me was when a friend pushed me to get into printing. I think it improves your photography in just about every direction, and like you, I like printing as big as I can... at home.

Love seeing someone using Piezography. I've read up on, thought about it, but couldn't
pull the trigger. Upgraded from a Canon Pro 100 that basically I bought for the price of the ink... to an Epson P800 which is very nice. My plan is to stick with the OEM inks while the warranty remains in effect... and after that look to Cone's stuff and the MSI (MIS?) group that distributes both B&W and color for him. They're still working out the P800, but it'll probably happen this year (so they tell me in emails). I've corresponded with Paul Roark who's also into custom ink mixes. We don't have Leica's, but Sony and he's done the Kolarivision mod for Astrophotography to pick up red sensitivity rather than go the Monochrom route. I'm undecided at this point as that's probably a year or more out for me. Yet I've thought and continue to think about the latter as Monochrom's are coming down in price (used). Curious which of the MM's you're running? M9-M or the current model? Also curious whether you've used the MSI/MIS (whichever it is) for color, too. I'm using Imageprint rather than the Quadrip at the moment and while expensive, it does a VERY nice job. Finding Matte papers ain't bad and often just right for B&W, but color is more of a Luster or Satin finish.

There should really be a forum here for printing!!!! that isn't a Yahoo group. "Just sayin'".
Roscoe,

Thanks for joining this thread. I think printing makes one a complete photographer, and in this manner who would not want to be like Eugene Smith and be both a remarkable shooter as well as printer. I likely will never be of Gene's stature, but I hope to emulate him as my role model.

I was an early adopter of the Monochrom. I had to wait 5 months for delivery, many of my friends thought I was nutz because I was a B&W film die-hard, but Leica kinda made my dream camera. So now my 4 year old Monochrom is at Leica N.J. getting a sensor replacement, and I expect 4 more years of trouble free service after getting an overhauled camera back.

So here is a secrete that I have published multiple times on this forum. I did a controled experiment comparing a B&W 2X yellow filter against a Heliopan 2X yellow contrast filter. The Heliopan is noticably lighter even off the camera, so I was expecting a bit less contrast, but I was blown away by the noticable dramatic difference in the histogram.

Somehow I got rid of the clipping, the midrange became prominent, and the histogram covered ten-zones denoting perfect exposure. Somehow the Heliopan filter hit the sweet spot of the MM sensor. I explored further and compared Heliopan 2X yellow filters: one was marked "Digital;" and the other wasn't. The Digital marked filter had something special going on, and I would later learn that Heliopan filters marked "Digital" have additional UV and IR filtering to eliminate those lumanance signals.

My friend Willie would correct me if I call the unwanted signals noise, but this filtered out light only adds to dilute the visual information, and in my context I call it noise. Anyways the "Digital" 2X yellow filter has a few effects: it removes unwanted non visual signal that adds to clipping; it allows one to maximize exposure (shooting exposure more to the right) for cleaner files with a higher signal-to-noise-ratio; and it creates files that only require minor tweaking so printing big without digital artifact is pretty easy.

Ultimately I would want a M-246 as well as my MM, but if I could only have one it would be the MM warts and all. The M-246 is a much more advanced camera with better shadow detail and softer roll-off in the highlights, then you have great high ISO performance, and a more updated camera, but the rather primative CCD has the huge big midrange that offers an organic midrange that resembles medium and at times large format.

So basically if you want long tonal range for that larger format film look than the MM is the better camera, but the M-246 is a better camera in just about every other way. Boosting the mids to get a similar effect in post processing might be easy to do, but realize this boosting of mids to attain the levels to resemble larger formats I believe will add digital artifacts and hurt IQ. My experience from heavy use of sliders and curves in LR5 suggest a more organic midrange is easier using the original Monochrom with Heliopan filters, but I am unsure the M-246 will respond with filters in the same way or to the same extent.

But here is a spin: the 18MP CCD sensor utilizes a 14 bit processor so 18MPx14-bit= 252MB files, but the M-246 although has a 24MP CMOS sensor is only 12-bit, so 24MPx12-bit=288MB. The end result is that the files from the M-246 are only marginally bigger.

Since I own a Leica SL, I have to say that it is big deal that the SL has a processor derived from the Leica "S" medium format camera, because due to the more advanced processor the SL has the processing speed to go 14-bit, so 24MPx14-bit=files that are 336 MB. So if you compare a M-240 to a SL you really can't.

The new M-10 is 14-bit BTW and now that Leica "S" procesor has trickled down into a color M digital. Wow. Know that the M-10 is streamlined when compared to the SL which has AF, Matrix metering and video, but the M has a rangefinder and its compact size and weight are its most obvios advantages.

So the reason I mention the M-10 and SL is I predict that a SLM will come out perhaps this fall at PhotoPlusExpo, anyways that is my wish, and it will likely get staggered till 2018 that a M10M might come out.

For me since I already own and shoot a SL a SLM would suit me just fine since I love "R" glass, already pre-paid for a 50 Lux-SL, and am number 5 on a dealer's waiting list.

Cal
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Old 02-01-2017   #114
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to an Epson P800 which is very nice. My plan is to stick with the OEM inks while the warranty remains in effect... and after that look to Cone's stuff and the MSI (MIS?) group that distributes both B&W and color for him. They're still working out the P800, but it'll probably happen this year (so they tell me in emails). I've corresponded with Paul Roark who's also into custom ink mixes.
Roscoe,

Jon Cone is a mighty stubborn man, and if anyone can figure out a workaround to locking in OEM inks on a P800 it is him. My understanding is that the P800 runs on a higher pressure to avoid clogs, and generally it is best to utilize the larger printers that use pressurized carts for ink feed and for longer term durability.

I am not a color printer, but it remains highly probable that eventually I might convert my 3880 into a color printer, or secure a P800 when a workaround is developed. There is nothing wrong with Epson OEM color inksets, except the price. For me it makes sense to purchase refillable carts and use Jon Cone's Archival Pigment Inks, which happen to be mixable and compatible with Epson OEM inks. Kinda seamless and you can even continue to use your system as is, or if you want the OEM Epson curves.

Anyways the cost savings is mighty big. I've only stumbled into Paul Roark's website a few times. I'm not that familiar to know anything other than he has an alternative system.

Cal
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Old 02-02-2017   #115
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I worked on the Woman's March image again last night. I am pleased. It seems consistent when I develop an image that each iteration creates more spacial depth via detail and tonality.

In my fifth version the bald man, the cop, the upside down American flag, and a steam cloud framed by the unfurled flag being blown to the right are kinda optimized, and in a way it almost appears like in a wet print where dodging and burning were performed to highlight local areas.

Anyways I did no such advanced manipulation to the file, yet I am able to control the level of detail profoundly. The amount of depth created I would say is almost holographic and there is a real sense of space via the rendering. Anyways all this came as a surprise because I was just playing around and trying to do something I never did before: make a B&W print from a color file.

Tonight I will tone down the warmth further in Print Tool via the blending of the three curves. I performed a baby step in that direction last night, but I do not know if version 5, last night's last print, is my master print, or if tonight's version 6 will exceed version 5.

Now if we judge all five prints made thus far, none would be bad prints, but I think so far version 5 is the best and displays the greatest skill. I am impressed by the results. BTW I will be giving this print away this Sunday at the NYC Meet-Up as a prize for our "Camera Circus."

Cal
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Old 02-03-2017   #116
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I inspected the print I made last night this morning, and I am very-very pleased. I kinda figured out what makes this image so compelling is a sense of timelessness because one does not know what the protest is about because the signs are soft and in the background. The main subjects were in the foreground and are close focused for the detail nearby.

I whitened a steam cloud emerging from a manhole chimeney which draws in the eye to the brightest highlight on the page. Above is the upside down American flag and underneath is the bald man, but when one follows the profile of this one person in a sea of people the eye is drawn to the profile of the cop looking back at the bald man.

The level of information I teased out has pronounced clarity of certain elements of the image, and present themselves as a heightened reality. Perhaps I am more fully exploiting the added resolution of digital photography, as well as the expanded dynamic range, but the beauty of this image clearly would be lost and compressed on a display.

I did tone down further the prevailing warmth a bit further. The increments were small, but the effect profound. The amount of depth in this print is mind blowing. Even though it displays grain in the shadows I still wonder if I could still print bigger, even if just a bit bigger for impact.

Anyways I think I did good work, although it cost me six sheets of paper or about $24.00 plus ink. I'm still learning a lot, but this is the space where wonderful discoveries are happening every day.

Cal
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Old 02-03-2017   #117
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Old 02-03-2017   #118
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Brennan,

Images I shoot for my gal's blog get "lifted" all the time. Most of the time no photo credit. I am talking fashion magazines that may be in foreign languages like Vogue, Marie Clair...

Basically I am giving away my photography for the sake of my gal, but for my fine art I will not do that.

Also the best way to show my work is prints, The response from Brent, Chris and the rest of those guys is what I live for. Then there is Gil in the Paper and Printing department.

Like I said, a display does no justice, and I think I have enough of a reputation to stand my ground. I'll let my prints do the talking. Where have you been? Its been a while since I've seen you at work.

At the NYC Meet-Up I frequently bring out folios of prints, many large, and this Sunday at the February NYC Meet-Up/Camera Circus I will be bringing the print I am writing about to the Meet-Up to give to someone as a prize for a bring out a cool camera. If you want to see it come to Lorelie's on Rivington this Sunday.

Cal
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Old 02-03-2017   #119
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I got a raise (and a better job) buying for the Used Dept in the Navy Yard about 18 months ago. I'm moving to Nashville in March and working for Musea doing print/mat work and color correcting for Indie Film Lab plus my own work.
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Old 02-03-2017   #120
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At the NYC Meet-Up I frequently bring out folios of prints, many large, and this Sunday at the February NYC Meet-Up/Camera Circus I will be bringing the print I am writing about to the Meet-Up to give to someone as a prize for a bring out a cool camera. If you want to see it come to Lorelie's on Rivington this Sunday.

Cal
One day I'll jump on a plane to join one of your meetings...
robert
PS: if money and your president will be not a problem ...
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