Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Rangefinder Photography Discussion

Rangefinder Photography Discussion General discussions about Rangefinder Photography. This is a great place for questions and answers that are not addressed in a specific category. Take note there is also a General Photography forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Rangefinder Stereo Cameras
Old 03-13-2006   #1
louis
Registered User
 
louis is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 24
Rangefinder Stereo Cameras

For those of you who want to try a different way of rangefinder photography, I reccommend a rangefinder focusing 35mm stereo camera.
If you're sick of hearing about German, Russian or Japanese cameras, you'll be interested to hear that the finest stereo cameras were made right here in the good old USA!

Recently, a German company RBT has been making a good business custom joining 2 35mm SLRs into 1 stereo camera.

In my opinion, other than the RBTs, these two are the finest stereo cameras ever made.

1. The Stereo Realist with f2.8 4 element tessar-type 35mm lenses and a whopping 123mm rangefinder base! (is this the widest base for a 35mm camera?) Top shutter speed 1/200. Built like a tank with a leather covered cast aluminum body by Alcoa, had provision for intentional double exposures and even had an early hot shoe! Most are now over 50 years old and still in regular use. Some had Ektar lenses, some had German lenses. The last version, introduced in 1960 as the Custom Realist, had Kangaroo leather covering!

2. Wollensak Stereo 10
Made by Revere, also had 4 element f2.7 35mm tessar Wollensak lenses. It was slightly more deluxe than the Realist, brushed aluminum finish, with a top shutter speed of 1/300, and a bubble level built right into the viewfinder. Rangefinder base was a generous 74mm. Also had a leather covered cast aluminum body. This one is rarer than the Realist, so it commands a higher price.

They use regular 35mm slide film, you'll have to mount them yourself in stereo mounts which are still readily available, and your pictures will be far, far better than those taken with the Leica, Zeiss, Zorki or Kiev stereo adapter. Both the Realist and Wollensak-Revere also had high quality stereo slide viewers.

The cameras and viewers from both these manufacturers were not only fine tools but beautifully designed and finished; they'd look good in a display case.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-15-2011   #2
Lawrence Sheperd
Registered User
 
Lawrence Sheperd is offline
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Charleston SC
Age: 61
Posts: 344
Resurrected from The Great Beyond. Just found my father's Wollensak 10 after having misplaced it for 40 years. I'm letting it acclimate before futzing with it. I'm almost in tears...I still have over 2000 metal mount stereo slides from our trips to Europe when I was a child, but I'm afraid the pink fungus has gotten hold of most of them....sigh.

Oh, BTW, wonderful forum. Glad I found you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-08-2011   #3
roboflick
Registered User
 
roboflick is offline
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 313
I love my stereo realist! I just bought a 2.8 with the kodak ektar glass. Having it converted to 7 p. Who else on this list is shooting stereo? Anyone in Wisconsin?
Nik
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-04-2019   #4
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
Bumping up a Stereo thread. Any discussions welcome!!
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-04-2019   #5
B-9
Devin Bro
 
B-9's Avatar
 
B-9 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,376
Always wanted to hack one into a pano cam. No real interest in stereo for me.
__________________
Made in Michigan

RangefinderGuy @ Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-06-2019   #6
GaryW
Registered User
 
GaryW is offline
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: SoCal
Posts: 11
Hello - New to the forum. Guessing this is as good a place as any to jump in. I've had a Kodak Retina 3C since HS - so that's a very long time now. Dad had one when we were growing up - a late 3c with the 3C light meter. I kinda went nuts when eBay started and spent some stupid money gathering all the 3C related toys. Included is a stereo attachment and a stereo viewer. I've shot several rolls of stereo over the years, and it's a lot of fun each time I go back to look at the photos. I've always loved the clarity of the Schneider Xenon lens, and I don't think the stereo attachment detracts from it a bit.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-06-2019   #7
B-9
Devin Bro
 
B-9's Avatar
 
B-9 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,376
Welcome Gary! Cool! As good as any reason to be here buddy.
__________________
Made in Michigan

RangefinderGuy @ Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-07-2019   #8
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
The more I study Stereo the more enthused I get! It’s a wonderful time to execute a stereo GAS attack as everything is available at modest cost. I’ve gotten enough gear and supplies at this time to get fully involved. I think camera choices are limited but excellent devices all. My personal GAS attack includes a pair of Stereo Realists, a TDC Colorist and arriving soon a Wollensak 10. I’ve gotten Realist aluminum masks and a Realist Green button viewer. Six rolls of Ektachrome and three of BW direct positive. Years ago I done a lot of 5x8 wet plate stereo and made Holmes cards.
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-07-2019   #9
EarlJam
Registered User
 
EarlJam is offline
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Southern California
Posts: 53
When I dug through my dad's camera accumulation in 2011, I came across a lens/shutter assembly from a Revere stereo camera. I suspect this came from Edmund Scientific, probably leftover parts. There was also a Coronet "3D" camera which used 127 rollfilm.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Coronet.JPG (152.5 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg Revere_01.JPG (162.1 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg Revere_02.JPG (141.0 KB, 3 views)
  Reply With Quote

Old 04-07-2019   #10
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
Surplusshed is still selling these lens assemblies. They own the Wollensak building in Rochester and many parts from their operation. Wollensak was founded in 1899 and later owned by Revere. Both the Revere 33 and the Wollensak 10 shared the same basic body. Revere built 27,000 stereo cameras while Wollensak produced only 4,000. To put those numbers in perspective, there were a 125,000 Stereo Realists built! The Wollensak 10 uses superior f 2.7 35mm Tessar lenses and has a top shutter speed of 1/300. Some feel it is the “best” stereo camera made. Interesting is that in all its years making cine Cameras the Wollensak 10 was the Only still camera made by them!
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #11
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Bumping an old thread here -- my wife purchased one of Brian May's stereoscopic books a couple of weeks ago, and we're really getting a lot of enjoyment out of it. Of course I've now gotten bit by the stereo bug, and just ordered a Revere 33. Can any of you Revere experts impart any usage etc advice to a stereo newby?
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #12
mothertrucker
Registered User
 
mothertrucker's Avatar
 
mothertrucker is offline
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 190
For those looking for more stereo photography books there was a small run of stereo cards called "Hidden Depths" by Jacques Henri Lartigue available at:https://www.designforlife.com/

I bought a set a couple of years ago and it's really a great collection.

Vince - I don't have a Revere but I do have an old ICA Polyskop which I use. Stereo imagery is not the same ballgame as regular 2D photography.

Everything seems so much smaller in the final image - some artifact of putting this tiny little print or paired set of slides up to your face. I recommend deep focus (smaller aperture is better), plenty of sunlight, and either a grand setting like a canyon or a waterfall, or have many things of interest from foreground to background to make a good stereo effect.

One image in the Lartigue set I thought was really clever was a double exposure he made of a stairway and then a veiled figure coming down the same stair. The ultimate effect was a transparent, three dimensional phantasm. Really great.
__________________
argentography.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #13
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by mothertrucker View Post
For those looking for more stereo photography books there was a small run of stereo cards called "Hidden Depths" by Jacques Henri Lartigue available at:https://www.designforlife.com/

I bought a set a couple of years ago and it's really a great collection.

Vince - I don't have a Revere but I do have an old ICA Polyskop which I use. Stereo imagery is not the same ballgame as regular 2D photography.

Everything seems so much smaller in the final image - some artifact of putting this tiny little print or paired set of slides up to your face. I recommend deep focus (smaller aperture is better), plenty of sunlight, and either a grand setting like a canyon or a waterfall, or have many things of interest from foreground to background to make a good stereo effect.

One image in the Lartigue set I thought was really clever was a double exposure he made of a stairway and then a veiled figure coming down the same stair. The ultimate effect was a transparent, three dimensional phantasm. Really great.
Many thanks -- interesting that you mention Lartigue. Back in 1993 I attended the opening of a Lartigue show (En Route Monsieur Lartigue) at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, and one of the very clever things they did was to take some of his more famous images (like the one of racing cars with the skewed people in the background) and made them 3D. What they did was to get two large mirrors (like 30"x30") and arrange them in a V (so the point of the V was facing you). You stuck your nose against the point of the V - so that one eye was looking at the view in one mirror and the other eye was looking at the view in the other mirror - and you saw these amazing, large 3D black and white photos. I'd never seen anything like it before or since.

Here is one question I do have -- I'm considering scanning the negs and making my own little stereo cards. What's the best way to scan the pairs of frames? I have a Plustek 35mm only scanner, but I'm suspecting that the 'spread' between the two neg frames would be wider than 24x36mm, correct? Would I be better off using a 120 scanner?
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #14
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
The problem with stereo today in 2020 is that hardly anyone is willing to “do it” like it was meant to be. That is, slide film correctly mounted and looked at through a hand held viewer. Nearly everyone wants some digital BS wrapped into the affair. .....just put the electronics down and enjoy stereo the proper way. Everything you need to know about Stereo is covered in “The Realist Manual”. It comes with plastic viewing glasses that let you see the book illustrations in 3D. •••••. The Revere 33 is a fine camera. Shoot it. Keep to the slowest speed film you can get.
__________________
Happily Collecting and Shooting Cameras most folks never heard of.
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #15
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,784
Thanks for the reminder. I've got to send my Stereo Realist red button viewer to be repaired. I cleaned a lot of battery corrosion out of it, but it still won't turn on.
__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #16
David Hughes
David Hughes
 
David Hughes's Avatar
 
David Hughes is offline
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 7,662
Thanks Vince, that's the first mention I've come across of Lartigue in any forum for a long long time. I first came across his pictures when doing some research about 25 years ago, fascinating is the word for him and his photo's.


Regards, David


PS Forgot to mention the Olympus advert's using some of his shots, never mind...
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #17
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambro51 View Post
The problem with stereo today in 2020 is that hardly anyone is willing to “do it” like it was meant to be. That is, slide film correctly mounted and looked at through a hand held viewer. Nearly everyone wants some digital BS wrapped into the affair. .....just put the electronics down and enjoy stereo the proper way. Everything you need to know about Stereo is covered in “The Realist Manual”. It comes with plastic viewing glasses that let you see the book illustrations in 3D. •••••. The Revere 33 is a fine camera. Shoot it. Keep to the slowest speed film you can get.
I appreciate the sentiment, but what I’d like to initially do is try to make my own stereo cards. This Brian May book has given me the motivation. Maybe I’ll do slides at some point, but that’s my initial goal. And if I can meld digital BS into the equation, it doesn’t personally bother me. Having said that, I’ll have a look for the Realist Manual.
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #18
bob338
Registered User
 
bob338's Avatar
 
bob338 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sausalito, CA
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vince Lupo View Post
I appreciate the sentiment, but what Iíd like to initially do is try to make my own stereo cards. This Brian May book has given me the motivation. Maybe Iíll do slides at some point, but thatís my initial goal. And if I can meld digital BS into the equation, it doesnít personally bother me. Having said that, Iíll have a look for the Realist Manual.

You should be able to find the Realist Manual on ebay fairly cheaply, or maybe even a download from the internet. It is a great book when you're starting out in stereo.

Making stereo cards is do-able, but slides are so much more fun to look at. If they still made Kodachrome 25, I would still be shooting stereo! If you do end up doing slides, look for RBT mounts until you really know what you're doing. Mounting slides in those pocket mounts never ends well and there is not much worse than out-of-alignment stereo, it will give you a terrible headache if they're not aligned perfectly. Spicer mounts are great and cheap once you have mounting down.

As for a viewer, a Realist red button is hard to beat. I use De Wijs viewers, and they're amazing, but they cost a LOT of money and are practically impossible to find any more. The Revere viewer is a stinker, but the TDC and Wollensak viewers are actually pretty good.

Your Revere camera is a good one. It's probably my favorite stereo camera in terms of functionality. The best lenses in a stereo camera are in the Belplasca, but it is a finicky camera and easily broken. Any Realist will be great, the German lensed ones being marginally better. I have standard f3.5s, 2.8s, and the elusive Ektar lensed cameras and I usually go back to my German f3.5. Speed is not usually important with stereo as stopping down gives you better pictures. Anything shot at f2.8 is not going to look good in stereo anyway, so don't waste your money on an f2.8 camera.

I'm full of useless information regarding stereo cameras so feel free to reach out with any questions you have.
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #19
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Thanks Bob - a quick online search revealed that the Realist Manual can be had for anywhere from $25 on up ($25 seems to get you one in poor condition). And I’m not totally ruling out slides, just that the stereo cards are more on my mind at the moment.

The Brian May book my wife got came with its own stereoscopic viewer, and it works very well. I used to have one of those wooden ones from the 1800’s and a whole host of antique cards, but I sold it all off many years ago. The viewer that came with the book is similar in general design.


Stereo Riley
by Vince Lupo, on Flickr

For those of you who are interested, here is Brian’s website: www.londonstereo.com

BTW maybe some of you shouldn’t look at it - he has a video on his FB page in which he shows you how to make stereo images with....an iPhone!
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #20
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Hughes View Post
Thanks Vince, that's the first mention I've come across of Lartigue in any forum for a long long time. I first came across his pictures when doing some research about 25 years ago, fascinating is the word for him and his photo's.

Regards, David

PS Forgot to mention the Olympus advert's using some of his shots, never mind...
I don’t know of too many photographers who had done much of their best work by the time they were 20!
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #21
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Can someone tell me what the separation is between the pairs of images? Would the pair be the equivalent of a 24x36mm frame? Or is it wider?
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #22
wpb
Registered User
 
wpb is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 213
It is wider than a single frame. You get 29 pairs on a 36 exposure roll; and there is little to no space between the images.
  Reply With Quote

Old 2 Weeks Ago   #23
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpb View Post
It is wider than a single frame. You get 29 pairs on a 36 exposure roll; and there is little to no space between the images.
Gotcha - I guess Iíll have to scan each frame individually, not a big deal. Iíll try to just match up the spacing and size with an original stereo card.

This is very exciting
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #24
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
Realist format images are 5 perfs. The images come close, and often do, exactly touch each other. So, each image, left and right, has two other images between it ( or say separated by 10 perfs. Stereo cameras and viewers are designed to exactly replicate the eyes view. In other words, if you take a picture, and mount the slides and look through the viewer, the view is repeated. Look at the scene with your eyes, then hold up the viewer with a picture of that scene, the view is identical. One recent mprovement available to all internally illuminated viewers are single LED bulbs to replace the incandescent flashlight bulb original lay supplied. The LED raises the light level and light color temp for more pleasing outdoor views. •••••• a previous poster praised the Realist and Rightly So! I own many varieties and of All, the earliest made cameras (under SN 10000) used Superb Ilex Paragon lenses. Most shooters agree there are the sharpest lenses ever, and in stereo, sharpness is Everything. Now here’s the glitch with the standard David White 3.5, it vignettes at smaller aperature. Not too noticeable in a handheld viewer, but not good at all with stereo projectors (a whole level above handheld viewers). ••••••. Not for the Revere, only the Realist, is an amazing device .... the Steinheil Munchen Redufocus Wide angle lens set attachment. This converts the 35mm standard fl lenses to a 25mm fl wide angle! Though fitting any Realist, they work best on the F2.8 models, the 1042 and 1050.
__________________
Happily Collecting and Shooting Cameras most folks never heard of.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #25
Dwig
Registered User
 
Dwig's Avatar
 
Dwig is offline
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Key West, FL, USA
Posts: 1,650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambro51 View Post
The problem with stereo today in 2020 is that hardly anyone is willing to ďdo itĒ like it was meant to be. That is, slide film correctly mounted and looked at through a hand held viewer. ...

That was the then newbie method and hardly the original way it was meant to be.


Viewing stereo images predates photography. Sir Charles Wheatstone was one of the originators and demonstrated a successful, but rather impractical, view using drawings in 1838. One of the first practical viewers for stereo photographs was that of Sir David Brewster from about a decade later. The major "standard" format back in the day was the simple inexpensive view designed by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., in 1861. It became the dominate specification and was used by the extremely popular views from Underwood & Underwood in the later part of the 19th century.


Personally, since I only shoot digital these days, I prefer printing cards to the Holmes format for viewing in simple viewers.
__________________
----------
Dwig
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #26
rfaspen
Registered User
 
rfaspen's Avatar
 
rfaspen is offline
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 1,716
What Dwig said. This would be the approximation of Brian May's published work.
... which I really enjoy.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #27
mothertrucker
Registered User
 
mothertrucker's Avatar
 
mothertrucker is offline
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 190
I have a pilot friend who will stick his camera out the window while flying past a downtown and take a few subsequent images. The distance between the shots lets him make out together hyperstereo images.

Another great place to look for images is:https://www.greatwarin3d.org/images.html

Unfortunately the proprietor of the website, Doug Jordan, just passed away this January. But the collection is still up.

Stereo photography was really huge in World War I - if I were to get another stereo camera I would be seriously tempted by a WWI era Jules Richard Verascope with 35mm back.
__________________
argentography.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #28
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
In my wet plate days I used a 5x8 Camera. Now.....for cards, that’s the way to go. Contact print a wet plate neg and it has the required sharpness. BTW the OP needs to understand the transposition of images right to left, and having a bit less “info” on the left image.
__________________
Happily Collecting and Shooting Cameras most folks never heard of.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #29
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambro51 View Post
In my wet plate days I used a 5x8 Camera. Now.....for cards, that’s the way to go. Contact print a wet plate neg and it has the required sharpness. BTW the OP needs to understand the transposition of images right to left, and having a bit less “info” on the left image.
Yup got that covered - I should be receiving my camera tomorrow, and maybe might even shoot some this weekend. Very excited

Wet plate - mmm don’t think that’s going to happen at my end anytime soon. I gave up my darkroom almost 20 years ago, so I’ll have to suffer with my Plustek 8200i. But, I am willing to give the slides a try, so I’m not completely a hopeless case.
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #30
farlymac
PF McFarland
 
farlymac's Avatar
 
farlymac is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 6,349
Vince, you should get a Sputnik! A 120 stereo camera from the Soviet days. I think maybe you can just proof print them for a proper stereo card.

http://www.analogadvocates.com/page/sputnik

PF
__________________
Waiting for the light
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #31
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by farlymac View Post
Vince, you should get a Sputnik! A 120 stereo camera from the Soviet days. I think maybe you can just proof print them for a proper stereo card.

http://www.analogadvocates.com/page/sputnik

PF
This is going to be (hopefully!) one of those rare occasions in which I stick to one camera. Too many cameras in my life is getting too confusing for me.

Wait a sec - did I just say that??? Something must be wrong with me
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #32
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
Haha...I’ve got all kinds of stereo cameras, though no 120 or “WW1” era. The trick with stereo is composition and depth of field. Most stereo cameras follow the realist format, but there are a few that do it differently. An example is the Haneel TriVision. This little gem uses closer lens spacing and 828 film! Sort of an “undiscovered gem” is the KinDar Stereo Camera. Another Seton Rochwite design, built for ease of use.
__________________
Happily Collecting and Shooting Cameras most folks never heard of.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #33
Derek Leath
Registered User
 
Derek Leath's Avatar
 
Derek Leath is offline
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 123
Great thread.

I use to shoot a lot of stereo slides, mostly with Realist cameras. Found a cool FED in the UK that's full frame. I have an old Richard and a bunch of glass slides from the early 1900's some in colour, very cool stuff.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #34
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Well I just took the plunge and also bought a viewer and some slide mounts. So yeah, I guess I will be shooting some slide film. Hmm....guess I need to buy some of that too!
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #35
wpb
Registered User
 
wpb is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 213
You really need an Alignment Gauge Set for Mounting 3-D Slides; this will assist in making the pairs aligned properly.

A bubble level, shoe mounted or otherwise, is also very helpful in keeping the camera level. When the level is off, even just a bit, you'll have to rectify that in mounting making a tedious process that much more difficult.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #36
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpb View Post
You really need an Alignment Gauge Set for Mounting 3-D Slides; this will assist in making the pairs aligned properly.

A bubble level, shoe mounted or otherwise, is also very helpful in keeping the camera level. When the level is off, even just a bit, you'll have to rectify that in mounting making a tedious process that much more difficult.
Good advice. The viewfinder has a bubble level in it, so Iíll have to keep a squinty eye on it. Iíll post a few photos of it when I have a chance. Iíll see if I can locate an alignment gauge set.
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #37
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
That level Will divert your attention as you hold the camera. After awhile you won’t need it, the feel isn’t any different from holding any eye level camera correctly. ....as to an alignment gauge, maybe, but I never used one. More important is a negative cutter. You Must split the images correctly, and keep them the proper positions (left,right). Look inside your camera at the film openings. You’ll see a notch on one side. That’s so you can tell them apart. The left image in the camera becomes the right image in the slide. Properly mounted, the slide images align when the eyes are relaxed. Remember to use the slowest ISO film you can. These cameras are designed to use Kodachrome, remember that. Always use at least F11, zone focusing and depth of field tend to make using the rangefinder almost unneeded. (I’ve got the same basic camera, a Wollensak 10, But never liked using it. The Stereo Realist Just gets it “so right”.)
__________________
Happily Collecting and Shooting Cameras most folks never heard of.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #38
Ambro51
Collector/Photographer
 
Ambro51's Avatar
 
Ambro51 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 233
If you want to see Great Stereo Photography, get the Harold Lloyd “Hollywood Nudes” book. Mr. Lloyd, who’s image I borrowed for my Avatar here, was a prolific stereo shooter from the instant a friend gave him a Realist. Over the next decade he took 300,000 Stereo photographs!!!
__________________
Happily Collecting and Shooting Cameras most folks never heard of.
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #39
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Here are some photos of the newly-acquired camera:


Revere Stereo1
by Vince Lupo, on Flickr


Revere Stereo2
by Vince Lupo, on Flickr


Revere Stereo3
by Vince Lupo, on Flickr


Revere Stereo4
by Vince Lupo, on Flickr


Revere Stereo5
by Vince Lupo, on Flickr


Paul Burgess - Stereo Camera
by Vince Lupo, on Flickr

It's in very nice condition -- all the shutter speeds seem right on the money, aperture is fine and focus seems okay (though the vertical alignment of the rangefinder is off a bit and a little bit hazy). I may possibly send it to my camera guru, Frank Marshman / Camera Wiz, just to give it the spit'n'polish.

The last photo - if you're wondering - is of the original owner of this camera, Paul Burgess. Based upon the info that's on the original receipt, I simply Googled 'Oak Lawn High School Yearbook 1953' and a PDF of Oak Lawn's 1958 yearbook popped up. I scrolled through it and found Paul. Neat to see a photo of the original owner of this camera!

One thing I did notice on the receipt was that he also purchased a Model 22 viewer, so I found one online. Should be here next week.
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote

Old 1 Week Ago   #40
Vince Lupo
Registered User
 
Vince Lupo's Avatar
 
Vince Lupo is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,769
Not that I'm buying another camera -- but do you guys know anything about those Duplex 120 cameras? They produce a 24x24 image on 120 film. Do they require special 'Duplex' slide mounts? Just curious!
__________________
Check Out Our Redesigned Website! http://www.directiononeinc.com

Flickr Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/sets/

Check Out Our Latest Work On Our Flickr Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/direction-one-inc/

'Mapping the West' - Named as one of the Best Photo Exhibits of 2016 by the Washington City Paper: http://www.directiononeinc.com/mapping-the-west/
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
110 rangefinder cameras pshinkaw Half Frames / Subminiatures 8 05-14-2006 17:03
Voigtlander Bessa R3A/R2A alignment problem's comparaison Michaelta Voigtlander Bessa Leica Mount Cameras 3 01-12-2006 23:13
What about Kodak Retina rangefinder cameras? phototone Rangefinder Photography Discussion 19 05-11-2005 04:49
How did you get into rangefinder cameras? SolaresLarrave Rangefinder Photography Discussion 31 06-08-2004 09:27
Great Book on Rangefinders!! SolaresLarrave Leica M Film Cameras 9 10-21-2003 13:50



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:24.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.