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View Poll Results: Which is your main B&W film developer?
Kodak D76 / Ilford ID-11 (or equivalent) 107 26.55%
Kodak T-Max / Ilford Iflotec DD-X (or equivalent) 25 6.20%
Kodak XTOL / Ilford Ilfosol 3 (or equivalent) 61 15.14%
Kodak HC-110 / Ilford Ilfotec HC (or equivalent) 109 27.05%
Adox Rodinal (or equivalent) 112 27.79%
Pyrogallo Type 3 0.74%
Pyrocat Type 12 2.98%
OTHER - Commerical Product 29 7.20%
OTHER - Home Brew 15 3.72%
OTHER - Home Brew of Commerical Prods (e.g. XTOL+RO9) 4 0.99%
These Options are too [email protected]#$%! 13 3.23%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 403. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #121
Larry Cloetta
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The recently released and heavily revised and brought up to date “The Film Developing Cookbook” by Anchell and Troop is highly recommended for anyone really wanting to know what is the best developer for what film, and why that’s so.
Contains the most up to date dilm processing information available, including what is known about revised chemical make ups of old standby developers that might make them not exactly like they once were, or not providing the results you might be expecting, if you were expecting the results famous people got in the Sixties.
Granted, it’s easier to just “do it the way we has always done it.” if that’s good enough.
For anyone perhaps wanting more than that, this resource is almost indispensable. A fun read as well, as unlikely as that might seem.
Worth the time if you are even half serious about this.

https://www.amazon.com/Film-Developi...9806864&sr=8-1
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Old 1 Week Ago   #122
madNbad
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Last year, after several disappointing results from the local labs, I decide to use one film (TMax 400) and develop at home. After a dozen or so rolls, HC-110 dilution H has given me consistently good result. If anyone knows a way to mix the solution for a single reel tank, that would be great. All of the information indicates a minimum of 6 mL of HC-110 concentrate so I either load a single reel into a two reel tank or mix enough for 480 mL and dump half. I could wait till I have two rolls to develop but I'm not that patient.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #123
Freakscene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madNbad View Post
Last year, after several disappointing results from the local labs, I decide to use one film (TMax 400) and develop at home. After a dozen or so rolls, HC-110 dilution H has given me consistently good result. If anyone knows a way to mix the solution for a single reel tank, that would be great. All of the information indicates a minimum of 6 mL of HC-110 concentrate so I either load a single reel into a two reel tank or mix enough for 480 mL and dump half. I could wait till I have two rolls to develop but I'm not that patient.
Where the minimum developer volume/dilution/tank volume combination doesn’t work I always make the minimum of concentrate to my tank volume and work out a time. So if you are using a 240mL one reel tank, put 6mL of HC-110 concentrate into 234mL of water and work out a time. You can call it HC-110 dilution q or mnb or whatever you like.

If you are mixing 480mL and dumping half you are only using 3mL of concentrate. The reason for needing 6mL of concentrate is to fully develop the film, not for consistency of mixing. The late Roger Hicks and I discussed why minimum volumes of developer are needed here: https://www.rangefinderforum.com/for...minimum+volume

Marty
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Old 14 Hours Ago   #124
madNbad
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Thanks for the advice. Read Rogers article and switched to Dilution B.
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Old 12 Hours Ago   #125
giganova
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Cloetta View Post
The recently released and heavily revised and brought up to date “The Film Developing Cookbook” by Anchell and Troop is highly recommended for anyone really wanting to know what is the best developer for what film, and why that’s so.
Contains the most up to date dilm processing information available, including what is known about revised chemical make ups of old standby developers that might make them not exactly like they once were, or not providing the results you might be expecting, if you were expecting the results famous people got in the Sixties.
Granted, it’s easier to just “do it the way we has always done it.” if that’s good enough.
For anyone perhaps wanting more than that, this resource is almost indispensable. A fun read as well, as unlikely as that might seem.
Worth the time if you are even half serious about this.

https://www.amazon.com/Film-Developi...9806864&sr=8-1
The book makes no mention of Ilford DD-X -- one of the most popular developers?!? The book title is misleading, it should be called “The Kodak Film Developing Cookbook”
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Old 8 Hours Ago   #126
dkrawchuk
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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
The book makes no mention of Ilford DD-X -- one of the most popular developers?!? The book title is misleading, it should be called “The Kodak Film Developing Cookbook”
Chapter 6, Page 76. Also chapter 10. He seems to think quite highly of it.
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