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Travelwide 4x5: Good for learning LF?
Old 08-26-2019   #1
shorelineae
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Talking Travelwide 4x5: Good for learning LF?

Hi all,

I would appreciate your advice on a purchasing decision. For USD 300, someone in my country is selling a Travelwide 4x5 with a Super Angulon 90mm f6.8 with two film holders, focusing screen, pinhole insert, etc.

I currently shoot 35mm film/digital and medium format (Rolleiflex). I would like to try Large Format photography and this seems to be a good entry level camera as per the research I've done and the YouTube videos I've seen.

I would like to use it as a 4x5 camera for landscapes while traveling or environmental portraits. My question is: How important are the advance functionalities of tilt/shift/etc for this purpose? Will I learn about LF photography with this camera?

The other alternate is to buy a pano medium format camera or a wide-angle lens one such as one of the GSW690iii.
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Old 08-26-2019   #2
Rayt
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I would not recommend something like that and instead steer you to a used foldable camera like a Wisner, Shenhao, etc. In the beginning all you will need and probably use is front rise. After you have shot a hundred sheets you’ll know exactly what kind of camera you want.
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Old 08-26-2019   #3
Emile de Leon
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You can make some stunning prints with the 4x5 in that format..
Unless you want to fiddle around with movements..
You should be able to do great with that cam!
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Old 08-26-2019   #4
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Yes but he wants to learn how to use LF. The advantage of LF is the ability to use the movements.
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Old 08-26-2019   #5
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The whole point of LF is the movements. For all bar insane levels of enlargement you'll get little extra over medium format, but at vastly increased cost of negatives and development.

You'll learn nothing about large format from that other than pinhole (for which there are many cheaper options) and how to manage film backs.
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Old 08-27-2019   #6
shorelineae
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Thanks all. That’s indeed my quandary. If I do shoot with this travelwide am I better off shooting Medium format, if I am not getting the real lF experience. Only large negatives and how to operate an LF camera...

I might as well hold off for an Intepid or a Shen Zao as you guys suggested above. On the other hand I don’t quite understand if I need a movements to photograph landscapes in vacation? I had a project in mind with regards to travelling to a remote place and taking landscape shots. This travel camera could be convenient for that. Or a Fuji Texas Leica....
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Old 08-27-2019   #7
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I started with an Intrepid Mark II, and in retrospect, it wasn't the best place to start. There are other options that are reasonable, but what I hated about the Intrepid was its flimsiness and its habit of moving around in wind, or even when the dark cloth came off - too much having to reset the camera. If you have the money a more solid folding camera such as a Shen Hao would be a great place to start.

The ability to change perspective and move the plane of focus is really useful in landscape, but less so than say architecture. It depends upon your focus (sorry!) but you will still need to cart round a tripod, a dark cloth, film backs, camera and lenses, which do add up, so there's a lot to be said for a Texas Leica!
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Old 08-27-2019   #8
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The Travelwide does not have movements. It is not a bad camera if the focus mechanism is working. I have one.

Movements allow you (within limits) to get everything in sharp focus at the same time.

When you use movements the camera needs to be on a tripod.

Using a 4x5 in that way is slower to operate than handheld.

I would suggest that you do a lot of reading before purchasing anything.
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Old 08-27-2019   #9
besk
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Look at https://www.largeformatphotography.info

There is also a discussion forum on that website.
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Old 08-27-2019   #10
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Movements are overstated. To benefit from them super wide bellows are needed.
I went to LF and back.
Here is nothing to learn with LF, but just a hassle.
Loading film, developing it, even focus is something which is cumbersome.
And results are not worth it; IMO.
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Old 08-27-2019   #11
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In my experience, LF is not really needed anymore!
Learn photoshop adjustments and distortion controls..
Sure $x5 looks great but at a considerable cost of film sheets,
Holders, developing tanks and finally printing..
If you go "scan" to digital image, why bother with all before!
Ko_Fe is dead on.
I owned a Linhof 4x5, which proved a i suffered severe "ADD".
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Old 08-27-2019   #12
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Have to agree with the last two posts.

4x5 is just not worth the hassle compared to your Rollei.

If you're going to scan it anyways... the point is totally moot.

If you're wanting a larger negative I would def. consider a Fuji 690!
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Old 08-27-2019   #13
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4x5 is an amazing format that can teach you things you can't learn using smaller formats. The thing about movements only being useful if they are extreme is nonsense. You're asking this opinion question on a forum that is based upon lightweight, portable cameras for reportage. Once you find the sweet spot of camera, focal length and how you like to work, you'll see that extreme movements are mere novelty. Great for product work, architecture and special effects like miniaturization but if you want to do landscape, there is no replacement for Scheimpflug an the best way to get it is with a large format camera. 4x5 is the smallest you can really make use of this effect. You can't do any of this in a computer. Youcan selectively blur and mess around with "perspective" but it is not doing anythingmore than distorting the image and degrading it because the computer is interpolating data to fill in what is not there in the real image.
Save up for a good, durable camera with movements. You can get a Wista for cheap, which uses very common, standard boards and has more movement than you'll need for a long time. If you want to backpack, then you'll want someting lighter like a Tachihara but the are sensitive to wind. You could also get something like a Rittreck 5x7 with the more common reducing back and have the ability to move up to the bigger film in the future.
Don't think that a 90mm on 4x5 is necessarily a good lens to start with either. Start with a "normal" focal length between 150mm and 240mm. Don't worry about the age of the lens or technology or whatever. Make sure the shutter is in good condition and go shoot. After shooting large format for a while and maybe checking out some of the older lenses from before coatings and computerized design, you'll see that not much has changed. My old 1913 Kodak meniscus lens will match my 180mm Fujinon EBC from f/8-f/11 and on. It only flares a bit more in sunlight which is how I can tell the images apart.
All that said, you can get into large format habits by using a tripod with your TLR. Dedicating oneself to a tripod will teach a lot about photographyacross fomats but it is absolutely necessary for large format.
Anyway, if you wat to shoot large format, do it. Don't listen to the naysayers.
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Old 08-27-2019   #14
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One of the problems/advantages of LF is reduced depth of field. So even at f64 without movements there are scenes with defocussed elements. The travelwide is fixed lens without movements so any landscapes you take will not be pin sharp. Buy a feild camera or even a graflex and learn to use the format. I recommend the Chamonix 45n2.
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Old 08-27-2019   #15
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LF is useful if you want complete control over your image. If I was learning photography again for the first time, I’d hope my teacher started with a 4x5 view camera.
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Old 08-27-2019   #16
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4x5..printed really large..in a wet darkroom...will kill most medium formats in tonality..only 6x9 can compete..and even then..
And a contact print on chloride paper..will kill any print made on other formats.. with hardly any mount of effort..lil jewels..hangin on the wall..
And that really small 4x5..will actually be fun to use..unlike most other 4x5s..
And with that WA lens..you are talkin...a lot of fun there..
and..its cheep too..
If you want to do the Ansel Adams thang..well..that another equation..and another camera..
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Old 08-27-2019   #17
Deardorff38
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Shorelineae, I agree with Phil, AJ & Emile. I use 35, medium format and LF and no scanning or digital printing.... wet darkroom. A field camera is a terrific tool. BUT $300 in your country with lens & holders is a great place to start. Go for it.
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Old 08-27-2019   #18
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Interesting range of opinions here. I’m on the “pro-LF” side of things- once you’ve tried it, it’s easy to get hooked on the tonality of those big negs and low DOF. But for your purposes, Ie just starting out, it’s a tempting product but ultimately not ideal. Jumping up to 4x5 means jumping up in processing and darkroom/scanning equipment, or a huge jump in price for sending things out. That’s a big commitment, and you’d probably want as much versatility out of the camera whose images you’ll be developing. I guess that’s an irony about this format; there’s no dipping your toes in the water, you almost need to start from scratch building kit.

Then again, this camera isn’t too far off from something like an Alpa, at least the sans-movements part. But it does look like you’re fixed to the one lens it’s designed for and thefocusing range of the helicoid. For that, I see it as more of an adjunct to a more complete setup.

I disagree that movements aren’t useful. They’re fun, and if you’re looking to “learn large format” that’s a big part of it; developing and printing don’t change appreciably. My LF education was in architecture photography and movement is indispensable for that purpose, but has also opened up creative ways of working with landscapes and portraits. As I’ve alluded to elsewhere, I picked up a Fuji GX680, a MF SLR arguably heavier and definitely bulkier than a field camera, primarily for the LF style lenses and movements, but I didn’t want the hassle and cost of working with sheet film; that trade off made sense for me. (As an aside: it doesn’t nearly have the movement range of a field camera but as Phil said, extremes aren’t usually necessary...little lens tilt and your whole landscape is in focus,—who needs focus stacking?)

I’d ask yourself what you want to get out of LF, and if you’re willing to be limited to one wide angle lens in exchange for what else is needed to jump in to the format. I totally understand your motivation, w/r/t wanting a big negative when photographing somewhere special and difficult to access (I’ve felt something lacking when only bringing a rangefinder and a 50 to the top of a mountain) but sticking with MF might be more worth your while. A 6x9 out of a Fuji will still be a dramatic increase from 35mm but you’ll still be able to fit other essentials in your pack.
Also keep in mind setup time. The fact that setting up a shot takes so long has resulted in fewer, but far more carefully considered images, and that’s a plus. But even though I can carry the camera around just fine, I have to really, really want a photo to motivate myself to take 15 minutes to unpack and compose—not something I’m going to do when out with friends or en route somewhere. I mention this since you said “vacation”. I’ve brought along big cameras on trips with others where photography wasn’t the primary purpose, and rarely find the time to slot the type of photography demanded by the equipment.
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Thanks everyone
Old 08-27-2019   #19
shorelineae
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Thumbs up Thanks everyone

Thank you very much, everyone.

As Ian (Takkun) very nicely summarized the thread, there is a wide range of advice here. When this camera popped up on a local classifieds, I was sorely tempted because nowadays we need to pay customs+VAT tax on every online purchase and there are no shops here to buy from.

That said, I don't need such a camera right now. I intend to travel sometime in the coming year and had been looking at a Fuji GSW690iii for the purpose of shooting wide landscapes while on the move (literally; cross-country travel).

I do currently scan both 35mm & medium format negatives. I started learning darkroom printing recently and that's going slowly in parallel (I like it; it's fun!).

I think for my particular needs, as many of you have suggested, it makes sense to focus on medium format for now and wait for when I have the time, budget and access to a full-size LF camera.

Considering that I wanted to use a camera on my _travels_ which suggests that I'll be trying to shoot a lot in a small span of time, I may not have the luxury of time that LF demands. Thus, a medium format rangefinder (pun intended) like GSW690 or similar, suits me best.

I'll continue reading about LF in the meantime to educate myself.

My profuse thanks to everyone who took the time to reply; I learnt something from all your replies!
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Old 08-27-2019   #20
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You got a lot of good advise here. While portraits can be done, 4x5 is a great tool for landscape/ cityscape /architecture/ macro. The movements really give you control over the plane of focus.

I've shot with a lot of view cameras from Calumet, Cambo, Arca, Deardoff and Sinar. When I had my studio the Sinar rep came in and gave me his pitch on how Sinar had a unique system to let you really control the plane of focus. He loaned me one. I scoffed. It was 5x as much as the Cambo I was using.

I sold the Cambo. Sinar's system was a revelation. No more fiddle and guess. While their P/P2 cameras where a cut above, they're not very portable.

When you bite the bullet I highly recommend something like this: https://www.photrio.com/forum/thread...x5-199.169560/
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Old 08-27-2019   #21
Ko.Fe.
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Here is something nobody who is raving about LF will never make it available to read.
LF means slow and static.
By the time you set the rig, get it in focus ... the landscape will change.
Because sky, clouds and light are something which is constantly changing.
You will spend fifteen minutes before you’ll be able to press release cable and light, clouds pattern has changed.
This is why here is so many mediocre LF landscapes, including Phortio.

Same for portraits. No LF fan write you what for portraits with LF you need to spend a lot of time to get decent portrait. Not another nothing special snap.

What LF is good for?
If you like to deal with deadly chemicals it will works with collodion.
But all collodion emulsion pictures looks the same.
Or you could get into Ansel Adams sixteen shades of grey.

Most of the fun I found with LF was using enlarger paper as negative.
MG RC 3 1/2x5 photo paper fits into 4x5 nicely. No money and time wasted on LF film. No enlarger needed, but if you scan the final print...
I’ll post example later.
Here is one nice part in LF. Wooden field camera. It just as nice as Leica. And it could lasts forever.
Not a collodion poison, but liquid light emulsion.
Google it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shorelineae View Post
Thank you very much, everyone.

As Ian (Takkun) very nicely summarized the thread, there is a wide range of advice here. When this camera popped up on a local classifieds, I was sorely tempted because nowadays we need to pay customs+VAT tax on every online purchase and there are no shops here to buy from.

That said, I don't need such a camera right now. I intend to travel sometime in the coming year and had been looking at a Fuji GSW690iii for the purpose of shooting wide landscapes while on the move (literally; cross-country travel).

I do currently scan both 35mm & medium format negatives. I started learning darkroom printing recently and that's going slowly in parallel (I like it; it's fun!).

I think for my particular needs, as many of you have suggested, it makes sense to focus on medium format for now and wait for when I have the time, budget and access to a full-size LF camera.

Considering that I wanted to use a camera on my _travels_ which suggests that I'll be trying to shoot a lot in a small span of time, I may not have the luxury of time that LF demands. Thus, a medium format rangefinder (pun intended) like GSW690 or similar, suits me best.

I'll continue reading about LF in the meantime to educate myself.

My profuse thanks to everyone who took the time to reply; I learnt something from all your replies!
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Old 08-27-2019   #22
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Ko.Fe." This is why here is so many mediocre LF landscapes, including Phortio."
Beyond this there are many mediocre photographs with iphones, P&S cameras, Leicas et al, medium format....mediocrity is not limited to LF.....
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Old 08-27-2019   #23
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Sigh.. I routinely was able to setup and take a image with my LF gear in 2-3 minutes. That is, setup tripod, mount camera, lens on, standards aligned, focus , film holder on and image snapped. It's very doable. This is minus movements though and essentially guessitmating exposure. Anyone who says otherwise has probably not shot any LF at all or so occasionally that they are absolutely unfamiliar with gear. It does take time. But the more you use it the quicker you get
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Old 08-27-2019   #24
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5x7 Sinar Norma 1 by Nokton48, on Flickr

LF does not have to be slow. Inexperienced users are slow. This is my 5x7 Sinar Norma and with automated cables I can can use it NEARLY as fast as ANY other camera I've used regardless of format. Not THAT expensive; there is one over on Phototrio right now for $250 from Japan. Of course you can pay more. This is the LEICA M2 of view cameras. I've owned many M2s and I own many Normas. If you are contemplating LF in the near future I highly suggest you investigate the NORMA. World finest in every way.

I boxed this camera and set it up twenty times in a row, by actual count. That is a good way to learn the handling of it.
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Old 08-27-2019   #25
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This is contact print scan from 3 1/2 x 5 print made from enlarger paper negative of the same size. Click on it to see it in the large size.


Underwood by Kostya Fedot, on Flickr

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deardorff38 View Post
Ko.Fe." This is why here is so many mediocre LF landscapes, including Phortio."
Beyond this there are many mediocre photographs with iphones, P&S cameras, Leicas et al, medium format....mediocrity is not limited to LF.....
I'm not LF fan after using it. Including printing under enlarger.
You could not like it, but with LF it more often limited to very static objects (if you are not this F1 photog with LF SLR or with LF RF). But anything else, including mobile phones allows to take more pictures in situations where LF just useless. And for anything static even mobile phone wins because with mobile phone you could get better angle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stompyq View Post
Sigh.. I routinely was able to setup and take a image with my LF gear in 2-3 minutes. That is, setup tripod, mount camera, lens on, standards aligned, focus , film holder on and image snapped. It's very doable. This is minus movements though and essentially guessitmating exposure. Anyone who says otherwise has probably not shot any LF at all or so occasionally that they are absolutely unfamiliar with gear. It does take time. But the more you use it the quicker you get
Where, in NYC?

Where I'm have to pack everything before I go from one spot to another. Where I'm it is often even no roads and no flat, even surface to put tripod on.
It takes me or anyone else here more than 2-3 minutes just to make sure what tripod is ready , steady and secure. It has absolutely nothing to do with amount of exposures taken.
Or even film format.
Do not tell me what Ansel Adams was taking it with within two minutes in the Rockies. And read how Yousuf Karsh was taking it for portraits. No dross images, because he was preparing for very long time even before seater was in the frame.

I bet you or this chunk of metal user above just never really timed it, it just in your imagination.
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Old 08-27-2019   #26
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I use 4x5 for portraits and street photography. I have no need for lens movements of any sort. I have a late-model Crown Graphic with a top mounted rangefinder that is 100% accurate. I admit that a 4x5 field camera is not as easy to use as many, smaller format cameras, but it isn’t hard either. Composing 4x5 is easy, focusing is easy and pressing the shutter button is easy. Pulling out the dark slide is an admitted pain, as is changing changing a film holder. But the results from a 4x5 negative make it all worth it. Quality is better than square format 120.

I use about everything. 4x5, 120, 35mm film and digital. I use whatever gives me the best results, or helps me capture the image I see in my mind. 4x5 is a big part of that.

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Old 08-27-2019   #27
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Ko.Fe. .... nice rant. I think the OP was wondering if LF would work for him.....and his photo work ("I would like to use it as a 4x5 camera for landscapes while traveling or environmental portraits") rather than why it doesn't work for you.
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Old 08-27-2019   #28
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For me, large format is about looking at the ground glass and figuring out what you want to put in there. I like 4x5, but the view on the glass isn’t that different from medium format to make the hassle worth it (to me). So I deal with the much greater pain of 8x10 since I like the view. What happens if I move the camera here, do I need more depth of field there, nah that’s boring, maybe move it over here.....All things that could be done with a smaller camera, of course, but I like the process through the ground glass. And I enjoy making contact prints.

Not sure the Travelwide would give me that. It seems great for traveling light though, but not sure it’s worth it over medium format.
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Old 08-28-2019   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deardorff38 View Post
Ko.Fe. .... nice rant. I think the OP was wondering if LF would work for him.....and his photo work ("I would like to use it as a 4x5 camera for landscapes while traveling or environmental portraits") rather than why it doesn't work for you.
Please, read the entire thread and especially what OP has written. Preferably with paying more attention what OP was asking about. Right now it doesn’t looks this way.
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Old 08-28-2019   #30
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I did the unforgivable commenting on LF, thinking that the 4x5 was a real 4x5..
Not a cute weigh nothing, no movements, fitted with ONE lens, a 90mm..
Looking at images, I thought all the samples were with a plastic lens in a Holga..
without that wonderful results of a really bad camera and lens..
All seem to have flare, that even we Leica aficionados would cry about..
The cost seems remarkable and in a sense good value..

My opinion based on the awful experience: the slowness, missed images,
leaking folders, film coming loose in camera and now prohibitive price of sheet film.
Ko_Fe use of paper a great idea, with great result..

Please note that depth of field a major issue, movements available or not.
Avedon lost many hundreds of images in "Shooting the West".
Focus not being on as subjects moved slightly.
Remember a portrait lens on LF is about 480mm on 8/10, 280mm on 4x5.
Think of depth of field!
The camera gets you 4x5 but is almost a Brownie in concept.
M'Lady gave me an old "U.S. Camera Annual" 1953.
There are facing portraits, one by Cartier-Bresson (35mm film),
the other by a Hollywood photographer 4/5 or 8/10.
HCB's photo is way better, sharper, no room for retouching (original photoshop).
I cannot guess what OP would really want, that's a personal decision.
All like me in "No Go" are giving their experiences..
I used 4x5 professionally till i saw the light and voila!, A Leica M3, 50mm.
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Old 08-28-2019   #31
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Just because a camera uses 4x5 sheetfilm doesn't mean you are required to use it to achieve an f/64 aesthetic. Large format film offers boundless other creative possibilities. For example, getting that dreamy creamy range of tonal gradation, razor-thin depth of field at wide apertures, and that intangible three-dimensional richness smaller formats just miss. The travelwide gives you a fairly lightweight, hand-holdable, and simple tool to explore some of these other possibilities.
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Old 08-28-2019   #32
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Yeah large format is slow and cumbersome, but nailing a shot on sheet film is extremely satisfying. Also I’ve enjoyed the recent resurgence of using 4x5 in documentary projects, see the links below:

https://www.bryanschutmaat.com/grays

https://www.jdudleygreer.com/somewhere-along-the-line

http://www.alystomlinson.co.uk/personal/ex-voto/

https://www.matthewgenitempo.com/jasper

As for the Travelwide being a suitable camera for learning LF, if you’re mostly going to to do landscape work then it’ll do. You’ll learn about the 4x5 workflow and you’ll eventually obtain all the gear for that if you like it, then you can upgrade to a more flexible camera if you want to use longer lenses and movements.
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Old 08-28-2019   #33
Nokton48
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Dawes Oriental Garden by Nokton48, on Flickr

LF camera moves for landscapes are useful for doing things like this.
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Old 08-28-2019   #34
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Shorelineae, If you have a continued interest in possibly using large format, it's worth checking out the large format forum. https://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/. There's lots of info there as well as discussion by people who use large format cameras.
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Old 08-28-2019   #35
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I liked the idea of the Travelwide, and used it for a while. However, the helical assembly is very fragile. Mine took a minor hit and it destroyed the assembly and consequently the camera itself. You are better off with a Crown Graphic.
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Old 08-28-2019   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ko.Fe. View Post
This is contact print scan from 3 1/2 x 5 print made from enlarger paper negative of the same size. Click on it to see it in the large size.


Underwood by Kostya Fedot, on Flickr



I'm not LF fan after using it. Including printing under enlarger.
You could not like it, but with LF it more often limited to very static objects (if you are not this F1 photog with LF SLR or with LF RF). But anything else, including mobile phones allows to take more pictures in situations where LF just useless. And for anything static even mobile phone wins because with mobile phone you could get better angle.


Where, in NYC?

Where I'm have to pack everything before I go from one spot to another. Where I'm it is often even no roads and no flat, even surface to put tripod on.
It takes me or anyone else here more than 2-3 minutes just to make sure what tripod is ready , steady and secure. It has absolutely nothing to do with amount of exposures taken.
Or even film format.
Do not tell me what Ansel Adams was taking it with within two minutes in the Rockies. And read how Yousuf Karsh was taking it for portraits. No dross images, because he was preparing for very long time even before seater was in the frame.

I bet you or this chunk of metal user above just never really timed it, it just in your imagination.
I don't shoot LF anymore since I moved to NYC. This was upstate NY. Where it snows really bad and there's enough wildthings to photograph. I don't know what Adams did or what anyone else does. But just because you can't do it does not mean others can't. While I lived upstate I almost exclusively shot with a Chamonix 45n-1 and Velvia 50/100. Working at speed was important because most days I would have a limited amount of time to shoot/drive around looking for things to shoot. And yes I timed it because I knew when I would get off work, how long it is for me to get to a location that I had scouted out earlier and when the sun would set etc. Most times it was on average 5 min. I mean seriously. I've met people who shoot with speedgraphics on NYC streets and they are as fast as me with a Leica!!
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Old 08-28-2019   #37
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I bet you or this chunk of metal user above just never really timed it, it just in your imagination.
NOPE. I practiced setting it up at the time and timed myself each time. Built up my skill level.

Back in the 80s and 90s I was getting paid a lot of money by prominent local Architects to deliver my goods. They won Architectural awards when they submitted my photographs. Some work appeared in national Architectural magazines and local print.

If you are slow you will lose good photographs.

Cell phones will not do the same job. Box cameras work OK with longer shots generally. If it's fragile box better be careful with it.
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Old 08-28-2019   #38
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Ok. We must be slow here. This is what you need to understand.
We are not into architecture winning awards two mins shots here.
We don’t have architecture like this here.
But fields of corn and crop and ditches between and mountains of top soul on construction sites at new subdivisions and trails on the edge of Escarpment and iced ground on top of the waterfall. This is where I go with any gear and others with field camera.
Nor me; not anyone with LF I see here doing your quickes. Because it is not safe for setup.
How many of your two minutes shots were taken on the huge pail of top soil where you can’t find even and hard spot? And on top of it 70km/h wind.
I’m not slow; because i’m not into the same as you did for architecture snaps.
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Old 08-28-2019   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stompyq View Post
I don't shoot LF anymore since I moved to NYC. This was upstate NY. Where it snows really bad and there's enough wildthings to photograph. I don't know what Adams did or what anyone else does. But just because you can't do it does not mean others can't. While I lived upstate I almost exclusively shot with a Chamonix 45n-1 and Velvia 50/100. Working at speed was important because most days I would have a limited amount of time to shoot/drive around looking for things to shoot. And yes I timed it because I knew when I would get off work, how long it is for me to get to a location that I had scouted out earlier and when the sun would set etc. Most times it was on average 5 min. I mean seriously. I've met people who shoot with speedgraphics on NYC streets and they are as fast as me with a Leica!!
You never read about how Yosuf Karsh took his portraits with his only 8x10?
He would come in hours before...

So it was 5 minutes; not two. Thanks to be honest.
As for Graflex. I restored one and used one handheld.
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Old 08-28-2019   #40
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OK I didn't say you are slow. I said if anybody operates a LF view camera in a slow manner you can sometimes lose opportunities for photographs.

Most times I spend a lot composing. But light can be fleeting and changing as we know.

I also use Plaubel Makiflex which is like a European auto iris Graflex.
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