35mm "single" frame processing?
Old 05-11-2019   #1
rbiemer
Unabashed Amateur
 
rbiemer's Avatar
 
rbiemer is offline
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Cortland, NY
Age: 59
Posts: 4,988
Question 35mm "single" frame processing?

Single, in my thread title is in quote marks because I'm actually thinking the size will be about 55mm long.

I've been happily processing 4x5 film with the Stearman daylight tank but have recently been looking at the pile of Altiod Smalls tins we've accumulated.

And am thinking about making some tiny pinhole cameras.

These tins are aproximately 55 x 35 x 15 mm in size and I can make a jig to safely cut 35mm film to length inside my changing bag (I have not built the darkroom in my house, yet.)

But then, I realized I don't have a 35mm tank or reels...

I could clip an alligator clip to one corner of the film and put that--or possibly two--into the Stearman tank, I think?

Or, I could buy a daylight tank and reel(s) and load the short lengths into that?

I do have some small(5" x 7") trays and I could make a rack to hold them stacked vertically and put the assembly into my bag but I don't think I want to possibly spill developer inside it.


Anyone have experience developing such short lengths of 35mm film?

Suggestions or ideas gratefully welcomed!

Thanks in advance, folks.
Rob
__________________

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.
--Mark Twain
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #2
sepiareverb
genius and moron
 
sepiareverb's Avatar
 
sepiareverb is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: St Johnsbury VT
Posts: 8,326
A Hewes type reel should allow a short length like that to be fully developed, as there is no clip needed to hold the film. The Patterson style reels might also work fine, tho I would be somewhat gentle with agitation as there won’t be much holding the film.
__________________
-Bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #3
retinax
Registered User
 
retinax is offline
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 943
If it's one or two frames at a time, perhaps one could also develop them in black plastic film cans? I was thinking about doing that for figuring out developing times. Not sure if they are light tight enough, but filling would need to happen in the dark anyway... main advantage would be very little chemistry needed, doesn't make a difference if one re-uses developer of course.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #4
rbiemer
Unabashed Amateur
 
rbiemer's Avatar
 
rbiemer is offline
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Cortland, NY
Age: 59
Posts: 4,988
Quote:
Originally Posted by sepiareverb View Post
A Hewes type reel should allow a short length like that to be fully developed, as there is no clip needed to hold the film. The Patterson style reels might also work fine, tho I would be somewhat gentle with agitation as there won’t be much holding the film.
I thought of the clip only as a way to weight the film if I just use the Stearman tank. But I probably ought to just get a good daylight tank for 35mm and 120 anyway...but then I'll need to get serious about scanning, I suppose.
Hewes type reels are the stainless steel coil looking ones and Patterson style are the plastic ones that you can rock the film into?

Quote:
Originally Posted by retinax View Post
If it's one or two frames at a time, perhaps one could also develop them in black plastic film cans? I was thinking about doing that for figuring out developing times. Not sure if they are light tight enough, but filling would need to happen in the dark anyway... main advantage would be very little chemistry needed, doesn't make a difference if one re-uses developer of course.
I think the black plastic cans are light tight, not sure about the grey lids on the ones I have...and Fuji cans are clearly ( ) not going to work for this.
I also seem to remember that there are adjustments that ought to be made for very small amounts of chemistry--will need to look into that.

THanks, gentlemen!
Rob
__________________

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.
--Mark Twain
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #5
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,975
Or...use photo paper as a negative.
Advantages; can be handled under safelight. Just silly cheap, a 8X10 sheet of paper could be cut into 21 35X55mm pieces.
Since you said you have not yet built a darkroom I assume you plan to. A makeshift darkroom can often be rigged in a bathroom or closet.
Paper is slow, about ISO 6~12, but since this is pinhole you would normally work from a tripod or other secure base anyway. So, where ISO 100 may have an exposure of 2 sec. under average outdoor daylight then ISO 6 would be 30 sec. for the same exposure.
Printing the result would probably be a hybrid set up (unless you want to build your own front illuminated enlarger). That is, photograph the negative with a digital camera and go from there.
Processing paper would require a really minimal set up but initial cost for paper, safelight, chemicals, etc. could run over $100 but that would last a very long time if properly handled.
Also consider trying paper in your 4X5, again a very simple set up and is large enough to contact print for proof work.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #6
Steve M.
Registered User
 
Steve M. is offline
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,382
I've used the plastic Paterson reels to develop short lengths of 35mm film, and I've tried my hand developing in homemade tanks and even trays. Trust me, you'll be a lot better off using the reels and developing tank for a lot of reasons that will quickly become apparent when you try dealing w/ that tiny bit of film. Most 35mm developers and films need some agitation to get a good well developed neg too, and tanks will be what you need for that.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #7
sepiareverb
genius and moron
 
sepiareverb's Avatar
 
sepiareverb is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: St Johnsbury VT
Posts: 8,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbiemer View Post
I thought of the clip only as a way to weight the film if I just use the Stearman tank. But I probably ought to just get a good daylight tank for 35mm and 120 anyway...but then I'll need to get serious about scanning, I suppose.
Hewes type reels are the stainless steel coil looking ones and Patterson style are the plastic ones that you can rock the film into?

Rob
The nikkor/Kindermann type reels use a spring clip to hold the film in the center, this often leaves undeveloped lines on the film. The Hewes use teeth that grab the sprocket holes.
__________________
-Bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #8
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is online now
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Age: 37
Posts: 4,634
Maybe use double-sided tape to stick single frames to the wall of the developing tank? Except it might fall off or cause uneven developing.
__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #9
B-9
Devin Bro
 
B-9's Avatar
 
B-9 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,284
Second the suggestions of photo paper.

Why not even direct positive paper.
__________________
Made in Michigan

RangefinderGuy @ Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-12-2019   #10
Ronald M
Registered User
 
Ronald M is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,526
Film can, 1/2 oz, roll continuously . Similar to processing drums like Unicolor.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 17:18.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.