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back alley's In The Bag Joe's quest for the ultimate Camera Bag! So many bags .. so little time ...

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why so picky?
Old 05-30-2014   #1
back alley
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why so picky?

i went for a walk this morning and took the xe1 with the 16-50 lens…such a nice quiet, sharp lens…i took a few shots and used the rear command dial to change the aperture a few times…it was so easy to do and actually quicker than having to look at an aperture ring to do it. i don't mind doing it either way btw…
then i remembered so many comments basically saying that the lack of an aperture ring was a deal breaker for some folks and that they would never buy a fuji lens that didn't have one…
this is one example of people on the net complaining about something they hate on a camera or lens. there are so many…
it got me to thinking…why are we so picky about some of these small things?
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Old 05-30-2014   #2
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Aperture rings, to me, are a connection to a time when nearly all cameras had them on each lens - few Canon or Nikon autofocus lenses have them anymore and manual selection is done on the camera.

As you pointed out, it's generally no harder to select on the camera than the lens, but some prefer that original style of control. For auto-everything camera, one reason for their removal was that often the user would fail to select either the minimum aperture or an "A" setting and the camera would be unable to use the full range for exposure where the aperture was dictated by the camera. On some modern lenses, the selection is done by "wire" regardless where the control is mounted.

Ergonomics are a preference - I know that with some mf slrs of the bygone era, like Oly or Nikkormat with the CS shutters, all camera controls are essentially on the lens barrel - focus, zoom, shutter, and f-stop. You may like or dislike that arrangement.

Why are we so picky about small things? Because we can be, I guess. But a point I take from your post is it may be better to try something before we relegate to the list of things we won't use.
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Old 05-30-2014   #3
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Dear Joe,

Because to some people they are not small things?

Cheers,

R.
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Old 05-30-2014   #4
f16sunshine
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May get lynched for this.

I think Photography Gadgeteeers can be very picky.
Photographers much less so.


Cheers!
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Old 05-30-2014   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f16sunshine View Post
May get lynched for this.

I think Photography Gadgeteeers can be very picky.
Photographers much less so.


Cheers!
it could easily seem so…to some the gear is more important than the images produced from that gear...
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Old 05-30-2014   #6
Ko.Fe.
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Gadgetoholics never have time to adapt to the gear. They blame the gear for crappy pictures of theirs to have reason to get new gear without learning of photography basics, which aren't gear related at all.

And why some are so picky about camera bags?
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Old 05-30-2014   #7
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People are just different.
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Old 05-30-2014   #8
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and i'm not saying that being picky is bad either…just very curious as to why we can be so picky.
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Old 05-30-2014   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ko.Fe. View Post
Gadgetoholics never have time to adapt to the gear. They blame the gear for crappy pictures of theirs to have reason to get new gear without learning of photography basics, which aren't gear related at all.

And why some are so picky about camera bags?
i am way more picky about bags than cameras...
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Old 05-30-2014   #10
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I thin price comes into it too--its hard to justify sometimes thousands on something that has a tiny, always-in-your-way flaw that just makes the process a little more difficult.

But then again we also buy wacky vintage folding cameras and adapt Pentax lenses to our M6s and other equally absurd things.
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Old 05-30-2014   #11
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Sometimes being picky about gear is in pursuit of the ultimate image - other times, in pursuit of the ultimate photography experience - both valid. I've learned over the years to give new ways of doing things a chance.
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Old 05-30-2014   #12
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If the camera gives me what I want- in image quality, in handling for the type of shooting being done, etc.- then I will learn or work with quirks.

If I was a high-end professional being paid to perform in specific ways, it makes sense to have standardized equipment. You don't want to be fumbling around and trying to remember the quirk of this or that camera while in the field shooting an event or in the studio with art directors looking over your shoulder.

I doubt many people who *are* high-end pros are spending much time commenting on Fuji's newest zoom.
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Old 05-30-2014   #13
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As someone who considers himself to sit firmly in both camps.
Being a photographer I have, and, am willing again to adapt to any bit of gear in order to get the shot.
As a Gear head... I certainly have my list of qualifications when it comes to kit!
Aperture rings like some other "classic" controls used to be one of those qualifications but that is no longer so.

Maybe I'm just less picky now.
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Old 05-30-2014   #14
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Hmmm... I think I am more picky today than ever.

I have been photographically "aware" for say ~40 of my 49 years.

For the first 35 years, I had maybe 3 cameras and a lens each. The last 5 -I have lost count.

Times change, interests change, photography has changed with increasing availability and reducing costs. Most importantly, I think that accessibility has changed. Immediate searches, purchases, and shipping overnight -all from the couch.

To the topic: it is too easy to be picky. Before, you lived with kit and knew it like riding a bike. Today, the trivial can be perceived as irritating and the irritation can be supported by countless comments stating it is an irritant. Being picky almost seems a natural progression of the easy accessibility. Immediate satisfaction and immediate dissatisfaction are more equal today than ever.
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Old 05-30-2014   #15
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I'm picky about not being picky. Anyone who looks at my 60 years of pictures can tell that!
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Old 05-30-2014   #16
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Quote:
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I'm picky about not being picky. Anyone who looks at my 60 years of pictures can tell that!
Wonderful !!

Cheers!
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Old 05-30-2014   #17
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Perhaps because I am left handed, I strongly prefer all controls to be on the barrel of the lens - hence my love of the OM SLRs and the 35SP. I also shoot a lot in aperture priority, which isn't especially easy on my EPL1. Ironically, it is easier on my XZ-1 compact, as I programme the lens ring to the aperture settings.
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Old 05-30-2014   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f16sunshine View Post
May get lynched for this.

I think Photography Gadgeteeers can be very picky.
Photographers much less so.


Cheers!
Kaboom!

Just get a decent camera and shoot it. You can get used to whatever camera in a week.
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Old 05-30-2014   #19
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Some people prefer to complain about the "If Only" aspects of their lives. Perhaps looking for ITHO (In Their Humble Opinion) what is perfection, perhaps never being satisfied.

Other folks accept that there is no one perfect thing, trying different tools, sometimes they fit who they are at the time, but they change and then their tool choice does.

At one point in time my Nikon SLRs were perfect, then my Leica Ms, then my Nikon Ss. It comes down to choices. Size, operation, quality, preferred uses, funding availability, space (where you live) and lots of other variables.

I look at it as a journey and remember the cameras that I have owned fondly and as partners that have helped me get to the point in my skills (or lack there of) where I am today.

While I HATE the lack of control I have over my iPhone 5 camera it's availability is most excellent. Heck yes I am picky (don't get me going down the camera bag hole......) but not snobbish.

Perhaps being picky is a way of helping each person to distill down their needs from their desires. I enjoy listening to different perspectives as for me, it's the best way to learn.
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Old 05-30-2014   #20
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At the end of the day, a camera either goes in your bag or stays home - and that decision is determined by a gradual accretion of small details that some people may not even consciously notice. I regret to say that I have a lot of the gadgeteer in me, I buy and sell a lot of equipment but mostly that's to see what things really "clicks". But I shoot 90% with one particular type of camera. And I use that one type because I've bought, sold, experimented, and discarded so much stuff. Eventually that Darwinian type of process led me to where I'm at now. Cameras come and go but the M's rule over them all...
(this is a personal choice - anti-Leica folks can put back your flamethrowers).
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Old 05-30-2014   #21
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I find aperture rings in modern digital cameras unnecessary. Once I've decided on a particular aperture for a scene it almost never changes. 1/8000 shutter, 12,800 ISO and all that makes almost any scene suitable to any f-stop.

Sometimes the camera gets the metering wrong. I just change the exposure compensation to correct.

This is especially true when I'm using one of the DR expansion modes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by back alley View Post
i went for a walk this morning and took the xe1 with the 16-50 lens…such a nice quiet, sharp lens…i took a few shots and used the rear command dial to change the aperture a few times…it was so easy to do and actually quicker than having to look at an aperture ring to do it. i don't mind doing it either way btw…
then i remembered so many comments basically saying that the lack of an aperture ring was a deal breaker for some folks and that they would never buy a fuji lens that didn't have one…
this is one example of people on the net complaining about something they hate on a camera or lens. there are so many…
it got me to thinking…why are we so picky about some of these small things?
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Old 05-30-2014   #22
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I've often wondered why so many people hate what tomorrow brings, and why they get up in the morning. That said, focus by wire has a ways to go in the Fuji world.
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Old 05-30-2014   #23
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I don't mind command dial lenses. Hell, Nikon have had them for years now.

What I DO like, it that from one lens to another and one body to another that almost everything is done in the same place/way. As I get more addled with age, the muscle memory is more and more important for quick use of each. Try going back and forth between two different types and you will see what I mean...so if you take the 16-50 out for a spin, leave your primes at home :-)

Tom
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Old 05-30-2014   #24
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I'm picky about some things, not others. When I first got into range finders, a little vertical misalignment would have send a camera to the shop for repair. If fact I did for a little horizontal alignment problem at infinity, pretty sure it did not affect real world use.

I've used cameras which are really nice in many respects, like the M6, but because I didn't like it qute as much as my ZI, it wasn't good enough.

These days I care far less, but I still don't think I'd get on too well with fly-by-wire controls. It's not about gadgeteer vs. photographer, it's just what I prefer. Yes, I'd get used to it, no problem, but while there are cameras which offer me what I want, I'll take what I want rather than adapt to something else.

Same for Voigtlander Prominent, the focus system on that is all well and good, but I'd rather the standard on-lens way. Contrarilly, I prefer the focusing on a Rolleiflex to a Hasselblad. On a camera that big I want the control when my hand naturally lies.

Anyway, I'm far less picky than I was, but still draw the line in some places.
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Old 05-31-2014   #25
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I'm kind of picky in slow motion. I try out new gear, work a long while to know it and love it, and maybe after a year or so, sell it off if we haven't "bonded" by that point.

Fastest item I ever bought and sold was the Fuji X10 (two months!), but it was a doomed love affair to begin with. I had sold my beloved LX3 to buy the X10 (so it had BIG shoes to fill) and I also own and love the X100 (so again, the X10 failed in comparison). That wasn't "picky" I don't think. (Or should that be "That wasn't 'picky', I think." ?? )
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Old 05-31-2014   #26
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Like some of the others have said, one reason is because cameras are expensive, for many of us we make a decision to buy a camera and we're tied to that investment for a significant period of time. Second reason is that for me personally I shoot all day every day so small things matter. You can comfortably wear a shoe that is a little too small for a while, you either get used to it or over time that irritation compounds, same with cameras too I think.
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Old 05-31-2014   #27
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In the grand scheme of things, next to, say, climate change or world hunger, fussing over the placement of an aperture ring is silly. But when it comes to photography, along with iso and shutter speed, aperture is everything. Proper exposure cannot be had without it, therefore how one adjusts aperture is hugely important. It also, at least for me, plays a big role in how I interact with my camera in hand and whether I am comfortable shooting.
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