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Frank Jackson on Street Photography I am happy and excited to announce a new RFF forum on Street Photography mentored by Frank Jackson, one of the best producers of analog B/W prints I have ever seen. His shows include the Open Shutter Gallery, Heriard-Cimino Gallery, and Ogden Museum of Southern Art. His images are in the collections of Smithsonian Ogden Museum of Southern Art, California Afro American Museum and Xavier University New Orleans LA. He has worked for or has been featured with Visa Card, Xerox, UCLA, Eric Owen Moss, Architect, Hasselblad Forum (cover),Gordon Parks, Muhammed Ali, Million Man March Wash. DC, Lionel Hampton, jazz legion photographer , 1995-2002, Stevie Wonder, B+W Magazine (British version) twice, Rangefinder Magazine, Dahon Bicycles, Arelli Wheels, Real Product Design, Automobile Club of Southern California. Frank's online images are at fotographz.500px.com and fotographzfrankjackson.tumblr.com . "While on this diverse photographic journey…I have to say during this whole time my love for fine art black and white photography kept growing. I always found time to shoot in different cities and my own personal work…this has sustained me through some very tough times. As of 2012, with the help of a very good friend I maintain a state-of-the-art dream darkroom. The darkroom helps greatly in the on-going practice of understanding “the light”, being able to process film and print drives me to keep my digital photography “organic”. I’m curious visually and shooting what’s, what on the street feeds this curiosity. Everyday I walk out my front door to “see” the world with a digital camera, a film camera, the “cup” and an open mind (mostly).

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Garry Winogrand On "American Masters" Tonight
Old 04-19-2019   #1
Mackinaw
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Garry Winogrand On "American Masters" Tonight

For those who have access to America PBS, "American Masters" will feature Garry Winogrand tonight.

https://www.pbs.org/show/american-masters/

Jim B.
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Old 04-19-2019   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
For those who have access to America PBS, "American Masters" will feature Garry Winogrand tonight.

https://www.pbs.org/show/american-masters/
Looks like it is available in full right now from the PBS site, not just a preview. I started streaming it to check and it seems to be streaming the entire film, still at work so I can't watch the whole thing now.
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Old 04-19-2019   #3
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I'm at work right now; my boss if off today; so I have a bonus vacation.

Thanks for the link and this timely post. LOL.

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Old 04-19-2019   #4
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I saw it here at the Siskel Film Center on the big screen late last year and it is REALLY GOOD.
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Old 04-19-2019   #5
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Sweet! I’ll have to watch it later on the PBS app.
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Old 04-19-2019   #6
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Twas great.

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Old 04-19-2019   #7
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Thank you!
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Old 04-19-2019   #8
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set to record. thanks!
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Old 04-19-2019   #9
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Whooo looking forward to this!
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Old 04-19-2019   #10
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Thanks very much for the heads up.

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Old 04-19-2019   #11
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Still watching it but what is fantastic about it is that the entire film is basically a montage of his pictures. Tons and tons of ridiculously great pictures that I had never seen, in great quality often better than prints in books. It is like the ultimate Winogrand photobook.
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Old 04-19-2019   #12
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The DVR is set.
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Old 04-19-2019   #13
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Not available to UK viewers
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Old 04-19-2019   #14
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Just watched it. A very fine retrospective of his life and work.
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Old 04-20-2019   #15
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Yes a fascinating documentary. The excellent, good quality 8mm color film clips he shot was something completely new to me regarding his work.

I was completely unaware of Winogrand until I read about him on this website a few years ago. I think many, many who shot 35mm film back in that day can relate to his instinctual feeling about photography. His genius was, in a way, that he pursued this instinct relentlessly.

Two quotes from him encapsulate his motivations (in my view):

“I have a burning desire to see what things look like photographed by me.”

“I photograph to find out what something will look like photographed.”
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Old 04-20-2019   #16
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While you watch, pay attention to how the critics discuss Winogrand and his photography. You may find that the men engage in unadulterated hero worship while the women are much more perspicacious in their commentary.
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Old 04-20-2019   #17
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Just watched it, fascinating, really enjoyed seeing some of his color images.
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Old 04-20-2019   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdmcclintock View Post
While you watch, pay attention to how the critics discuss Winogrand and his photography. You may find that the men engage in unadulterated hero worship while the women are much more perspicacious in their commentary.
Yes I did watch, and it was clear to me that the at least one of the younger women commentators (mainly the curator of an art museum in SF I think it was) expressed reservations about his book Women are Beautiful. Of course one might explain this, to some extent, by the modern requirement to apply current ethical standards to historical figures by the progressive left together with a compulsion to censor those who failed to comply with them. I did not see "hero worship" evident in the commentary (nor do I worship Winogrand as a "hero" myself, nor any photographer for that matter).

I did see a great deal of personal affection expressed for Winogrand by those that actually knew him, even lingering grief over his early death. That was expressed by both men and women, including his first wife, which to me is quite telling about his personality.

These are just my observations, as someone who is relatively detached from the artistic scene.
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Old 04-20-2019   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ASA 32 View Post
Just watched it, fascinating, really enjoyed seeing some of his color images.
Yeah, agreed, the color was great - beautiful. The documentary also really explained well why Winogrand preferred black and white. It was motivated by economics and the relative complexity of color printing for someone who shot the volume of film he did.
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Old 04-20-2019   #20
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Got to see it last September at an event in Richmond VA, with the director and purchased it through youtube earlier this week as I think its something that will be worth re watching from time to time.
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Old 04-20-2019   #21
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Puzzling that this is presented as an American Masters original -- it has been around for some time...

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Old 04-20-2019   #22
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I think Winogrand was more interested in the process of taking photos rather than the final product...a photograph. He died, leaving all those unprocessed rolls of film and unedited contact sheets for others to edit and print.
The question remains: is the creative work of a photographer finished and completed after the shutter is clicked?
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Old 04-21-2019   #23
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"It's not a photo until it's printed"
Tagline of the Bergen County Camera (BCC) store in Westwood NJ.

... and the PBS series is also not avaialable online in Germany.
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Old 04-21-2019   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kkdanamatt View Post
I think Winogrand was more interested in the process of taking photos rather than the final product...a photograph. He died, leaving all those unprocessed rolls of film and unedited contact sheets for others to edit and print.
The question remains: is the creative work of a photographer finished and completed after the shutter is clicked?

Taking them is the most interesting part .
I must admit my interest in them diminishes somewhat after that.
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Old 04-21-2019   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdmcclintock View Post
While you watch, pay attention to how the critics discuss Winogrand and his photography. You may find that the men engage in unadulterated hero worship while the women are much more perspicacious in their commentary.
His first wife had some very good insights. While he's in the pantheon of photographers, this doc showed his human side, and with that, some of his flaws.
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Old 04-21-2019   #26
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Quote:
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Yes I did watch, and it was clear to me that the at least one of the younger women commentators (mainly the curator of an art museum in SF I think it was) expressed reservations about his book Women are Beautiful. Of course one might explain this, to some extent, by the modern requirement to apply current ethical standards to historical figures by the progressive left together with a compulsion to censor those who failed to comply with them...
The woman’s criticism of Winogrand’s female objectification, whether you agree with it or not, was not an abuse of presentism by any means. Such denunciation accompanied the book’s release, which occurred, as the documentary noted, at the pinnacle of the ERA movement. This was 1975, not 1875.

If anything, it’s typically the “progressive left” that supports and embraces the arts the most, whereby censorship is generally the tool of conservatives.

And while Winogrand falls firmly within my top five favorite photographers, the men’s commentary was a bit more on the deifying, if not pretentious, side…this, however, largely being a consequence of typical “art commentary” prose.
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Old 04-21-2019   #27
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Is this the video that was Kickstarter funded a couple of years ago?
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Old 04-21-2019   #28
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Most of the criticism of "Women Are Beautiful" was based on political views, not on the quality of the art. The fact is, I think the book was weak from concept to fruition. But I loathe how people can't have an opinion anymore without checking their wallets for the membership cards they carry.
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Old 04-21-2019   #29
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Most of the criticism of "Women Are Beautiful" was based on political views, not on the quality of the art. The fact is, I think the book was weak from concept to fruition. But I loathe how people can't have an opinion anymore without checking their wallets for the membership cards they carry.
I think that is a position that is defensible as the basis for a debate, but also one full of pitfalls. One is how to properly define "art" in today's world.

I would say that political and social dimensions of a photographer's work are perfectly valid aspects of criticism. At the same time, to focus only on a feminist perspective in relation to one book is also overlooking other important political and social perspectives of Winogrand's innovative approach.

It is also useful to broaden the topic a bit to include other artists. Winogrand, for instance, was an admirer of Robert Frank. And, Frank's work certainly had an important political dimension.

To go back a bit further, Cartier-Bresson was very critical of the f64 group, who he said, derisively, mostly took pictures of rocks.
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Old 04-21-2019   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Murphy View Post
...
Of course one might explain this, to some extent, by the modern requirement to apply current ethical standards to historical figures by the progressive left together with a compulsion to censor those who failed to comply with them.
...
If you watch the film again, you may discover that what you call "current ethical standards" were contemporary when Winogrand was active. One of the curators who criticized Winogrand's vision of women had a falling-out with John Szarkowski, her mentor and the man who created Winogrand's artistic career. The notion of applying "current ethical standards to historical figures" is a straw dog.

After several viewings of the film, I find no evidence of what you call "a compulsion to censor," although the solipsistic adulation offered by Thomas Roma and Matt Stewart is tiresome.
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Old 04-22-2019   #31
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"It's not a photo until it's printed"
Tagline of the Bergen County Camera (BCC) store in Westwood NJ.

... and the PBS series is also not avaialable online in Germany.
Klaus,

I agree that's it is not a photo until printed, but photography is also a process...

Too bad you could not view this show. Pretty informative and really connected the dots for me as far as the history of photography.

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Old 04-22-2019   #32
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I remember seeing the MOMA retrospective in 1988 or so. As they mentioned in the documentary, it was somewhat startling to see that they had gone through thousands of negatives and chose images to print for the show (since he had not decided what to print from this massive archive). I recall that it was controversial at the time —*thousands of aimless shots taken from a car, with dubious choices made by the curators (and Thom Roma, apparently). Looking through the multitude of images on those rolls of negatives gave the viewer the impression of an artist lost, blindly shooting, almost randomly, hoping for a connection to be found at some later date when a print could be made, or never.
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Old 04-22-2019   #33
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I remember seeing the MOMA retrospective in 1988 or so. As they mentioned in the documentary, it was somewhat startling to see that they had gone through thousands of negatives and chose images to print for the show (since he had not decided what to print from this massive archive). I recall that it was controversial at the time —*thousands of aimless shots taken from a car, with dubious choices made by the curators (and Thom Roma, apparently). Looking through the multitude of images on those rolls of negatives gave the viewer the impression of an artist lost, blindly shooting, almost randomly, hoping for a connection to be found at some later date when a print could be made, or never.
J,

Garry created an interesting legacy.

Because I have shot film with a disregard to printing, I got judged rather harshly. My premise is/was to wet print my negatives, but at this time I have no darkroom. Realize that I live in NYC and that I believe that shooting 150 rolls a month at my peak was a wise thing to do because film was less costly and I was able to use economy of scale to reduce prices further.

So I created an archive of sorts, and I also believe time is the best editor. Much of what I shot has been torn down and has been replaced. I recorded and documented history. I pretty much have an ethnography of a changing and disappearing NYC. Several times I have been compared to Garry, and as Klaus has quoted above, "It is not a photograph until a print is made," but I also say that "photography is a process."

On the other hand 5 years ago I purchased a Leica Monochrom and have been printing and have evolved into a fine art printer who specializes in B&W using Piezography. With digital I print a plenty.

It was suggested a few times that 1964 was a high point in Garry's work in the documentary, but I can understand the logic of concentrating on just "image capture" when he had no access to a darkroom, and then later was running out of time towards the end of his life.

Cal
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