Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Photography General Interest

Photography General Interest Neat Photo stuff NOT particularly about Rangefinders.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Resolution . . . or Lens Choice?
Old 11-09-2018   #1
Benjamin Marks
Registered User
 
Benjamin Marks is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,651
Resolution . . . or Lens Choice?

I am going to be in Tokyo for two weeks next month. I have almost as much fun putting together a kit for a trip, as I do actually going. Yeah . . . bit of a photo nut.

There are three camera choices before me, IQ is excellent in all three:

1) Leica M9/21-35-50-90. Pros: compact; cons: no IBIS, battery life marginal.
2) Nikon D3/21-50-105. Pros: great battery life; cons: heavy, no IBIS
3) Pentax K1/24-70(zoom), 50 (or 31/40/77). Pros: IBIS, better high ISO; cons: no ultrawide.

The Pentax is the new toy -- the files are huge, larger than I need, in fact. But the IQ is astounding -- equal or better to what medium format could give me in the 90's. ISO's up to 3200 are perfectly usable, and it will be winter in Japan -- plenty of darkness. But I don't really have an ultrawide for it, and like to travel with one when I am visiting somewhere new. Also, I am still learning the camera and occasionally have to reset it to factory settings when I don't know how to engage a particular function.

The Leica is probably the sweet spot for file size and quality, although the high ISO usability tops out at 1600. I have a couple of batteries, and can address battery life that way.

The Nikon is the old warhorse. Utterly dependable. I have a full selection of lenses -- no compromises on lens choice. It is heavy, but the battery will go for days. File sizes and resolution are moderate, by today's standards.

So: I'd frame the question this way -- which would you choose? The lenses you feel you need, or the IQ the "latest and greatest" will surely provide?

[Edit: the smart move is no doubt to go with an Oly m 3/4 and a couple of lenses. Smarter (and kinder) for aging back . . .I always overpack, this is a habitual error of mine.] :0
__________________
Benjamin’s Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #2
ptpdprinter
Registered User
 
ptpdprinter is offline
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,644
Leica M9 and lenses. It's the smallest and lightest of the choices. I'd probably leave the 50mm at home.
__________________
ambientlightcollection.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #3
Dogman
Registered User
 
Dogman is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,428
I'll agree with ptpdprinter. Except I would leave the 90mm at home.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #4
Deardorff38
Registered User
 
Deardorff38 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 637
Quote:
Originally Posted by ptpdprinter View Post
Leica M9 and lenses. It's the smallest and lightest of the choices. I'd probably leave the 50mm at home.

Ditto 21 & 35 does it for me on Japanese streets
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #5
Ko.Fe.
Kostya Fedot
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Posts: 7,123
Are you into static objects at f8 under low light?
This is the only reason I could find to be abscessed with IBIS.
Personally I quit on DSLR for trips years ago. Too big.
Last time I took digital on trip it was M-E with 28 and 40. Largest aperture was f2. No issues with low light.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #6
Godfrey
somewhat colored
 
Godfrey's Avatar
 
Godfrey is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 8,980
M9 with either 21/50 or 35/90 or 50/90 lens pairs would be enough for me. I find it very rare that I get much value out of carrying a third lens these days.

On my holiday trip to Ireland and the Isle of Man last year I had the M-D + 35/50 with me, and the 50 made 90% of my photos. I should have carried the 90 on that trip as the longer focal length would have enabled a few photos that I passed on because I'd have to crop too much.

Add a small tabletop tripod to accommodate the limited high ISO capability and lack of image stabilization in the M9. That makes it easy to hold the camera up against something or down on something for a good stable shot.

G
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #7
Benjamin Marks
Registered User
 
Benjamin Marks is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,651
Ah, but I will be traveling with my family, which means more portraits than I would take on a pure tourist jaunt. Particularly with the M9's low-light capabilities, a fast 50 or 35 is a godsend. Still, there are other choices.

Maybe the M9 with lenses, and small Oly m /4/3 as a backup, with an M-adapter. Monopod for low light.

I could go:

21/2.8 Biogon
35/1.2 Nockton (the M9 wears this v.1 beauty most of the time anyway)
50/1.4 Summilux or 75/2 Summicron

or for smallest kit:

15 Heliar
35 Biogon
90 Elmarit
__________________
Benjamin’s Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #8
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,296
I vote for the K-1. Of course, if you typically prefer to use a wider angle of view than the Pentax kit allows, then the M9 would be good.

The K-1 is much smaller and weighs about 25% less than the D3. Would it be that hard to become sufficiently familiar with the K-1

The M9 is much lighter than the K-1. But you mention anticipating plenty of low light situations which is a handicap for the M9.

I think the D3 is just too big and heavy to lug round for two weeks.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #9
David Hughes
David Hughes
 
David Hughes's Avatar
 
David Hughes is offline
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 7,370
When I go traveling I often notice little details and photogrph them and that's why I'd suggest a 90mm in the line up.


Regards, David
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #10
Ko.Fe.
Kostya Fedot
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Posts: 7,123
Yes, on my trip with M-E I was in company of three daughters. 40/2 and 28 5.6 did it all for me. Portraits on the fly and street photography.
Two batteries for from 10am to 8pm 200+ per day pictures. One memory card, no backup cameras, but iPhone.
It worked as one wide lens for enough light, one fast lens for low light. I had smallest lenses and it was convenient.
One 35 1.2 is enough.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #11
benlees
Registered User
 
benlees is offline
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Edmonton, AB
Age: 47
Posts: 1,485
I vote for the K-1, as it's new to you. A wide for it would be ideal, however.



I prefer to travel light- meaning one lens. Worrying about the photos you could have got is just part of the fun.
__________________
flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #12
Beemermark
Registered User
 
Beemermark's Avatar
 
Beemermark is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Wilmington, NC
Posts: 1,667
M9, 21 & 50.


I have too many cameras and always end up taking way too many. End up using the M9 and 50mm for 90% of my subjects. I've tried to force myself to take pictures with the 90 and just can't do it. If you do like the 90 then take the 35 & 90.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #13
retinax
Registered User
 
retinax is offline
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 847
Over two lenses for me means over one body. Changing lenses is a pain, especially if you're traveling with family and can't take forever to get the shot. I suggest you take the Pentax or the M9 plus the m4/3, and have them share one of the lenses which will serve as the long one on the m4/3.
Or one body and max. two lenses.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #14
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Santiago, Chile
Age: 45
Posts: 19,746
The Pentax and the zoom only.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #15
DanskDynamit
Registered User
 
DanskDynamit's Avatar
 
DanskDynamit is offline
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 398
I never understood this kind of posts..
__________________
DanskDynamit
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #16
airfrogusmc
Registered User
 
airfrogusmc is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 5,489
M9 and the 35 is what i would take. This is my usual travel kit.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #17
Larry Cloetta
Registered User
 
Larry Cloetta is offline
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jackson, WY
Age: 69
Posts: 1,420
Odd man out, but having had everything except the K1, I’d take the D3 if nailing every shot was important to me. The metering on the M9 is a joke in comparison. No one needs ibis, and the “too heavy” thing that constantly pops up here always astounds me. And I’m old.

But if the photography is just a sideline, and your focus (argh) is on the travel not the pictures, just take the M9 and the 35 like someone else suggested. You’ll get every memory you need.
That means you leave the K1 here, and I’d like to use it while you are away, because it yields the best files.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #18
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Age: 37
Posts: 4,548
going off of your gallery, i’d just take the pentax with the zoom, and maybe the leica with the 35mm.
__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #19
Benjamin Marks
Registered User
 
Benjamin Marks is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,651
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanskDynamit View Post
I never understood this kind of posts..
Well everyone has a point of view, and those points of view are interesting to me, which is why I asked the question. There is always the chance that an argument made here, or an approach that someone takes to their own work, will be useful. So I ask.
__________________
Benjamin’s Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #20
Mute-on
Registered User
 
Mute-on is offline
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 282
In my three trips to Tokyo I’ve only ever taken Leica Ms with a combination of two lenses selected from 28, 35 and 50.

I’d go with 35 and 50, given your choices. Add one of the 21 or 90 if you desperately want a third option, but that will be the 10% lens.

We tend to do a lot of walking in Japan, so you will need comfy shoes that provide excellent support, and a backpack for your camera(s) and additional lens(es).

You will love Tokyo. Have a great trip!

Cheers

J
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #21
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Marks View Post
it will be winter in Japan -- plenty of darkness.
We haven't had much of a winter here so far - its 24C in Yokohama today. The days will be short, but Tokyo is on about the same latitude as Charlotte, so longer than in Vermont no doubt.

As for your kit, my choice would be one camera and a 35mm (or equivalent) and maybe a 21mm (or equivalent). That's what I shoot normally anyway. Maybe something super wide like a 12mm would be fun as well. Getting around Tokyo involves a lot of walking, so the lighter the kit is the better. Have a great trip!
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-09-2018   #22
DanskDynamit
Registered User
 
DanskDynamit's Avatar
 
DanskDynamit is offline
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Marks View Post
Well everyone has a point of view, and those points of view are interesting to me, which is why I asked the question. There is always the chance that an argument made here, or an approach that someone takes to their own work, will be useful. So I ask.
thats fine, I'm not judging you, I just don't understand how someone who is into photography can't figure out what gear to use.
If I think about other kind of arts, I can't imagine a painter asking (or even doubting about) which brush to use, a drawer which pencil, a musician which guitar to play in the next song or a sculptor what kind of rasp and let alone asking other people about it.



I hope this thread helps you to find it out.
__________________
DanskDynamit
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #23
Benjamin Marks
Registered User
 
Benjamin Marks is offline
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,651
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanskDynamit View Post
thats fine, I'm not judging you, I just don't understand how someone who is into photography can't figure out what gear to use.
If I think about other kind of arts, I can't imagine a painter asking (or even doubting about) which brush to use, a drawer which pencil, a musician which guitar to play in the next song or a sculptor what kind of rasp and let alone asking other people about it.



I hope this thread helps you to find it out.
I think you will find that at RFC folks enjoy talking about the gear choices they may as much as they enjoy making the photographs that are meaningful to them. My father was a painter, and I can tell you that choice of materials/gear was of intense interest to him. I think it is part of the creative process. And have you ever hung out with guitar guys? Whoo. Guitar guys can make camera enthusiasts look positively tame.

Perhaps I misunderstood your comment, though. Are you saying that I appear uncertain about my own choices and that apparent confusion is itself difficult to understand? As I explained in the OP, choosing what to take and tailoring the choices to the subject is fun for me. So this activity. . . the one I am engaged in as I type this . . . is part of the pleasure of photography.
__________________
Benjamin’s Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #24
Prest_400
Multiformat
 
Prest_400's Avatar
 
Prest_400 is offline
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Sweden/Spain
Posts: 893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Marks View Post
And have you ever hung out with guitar guys? Whoo. Guitar guys can make camera enthusiasts look positively tame.
1959 Les Paul sunburst of course! (All I know about guitar is just from listening to music, can't play the instrument itself. That year and model was quite featured in Classic Rock)
For some reason, Fountain Pen and Clock guys are on that side as well.



I'd pick the Pentax with the Zoom. 24-70 is quite versatile and IBIS is gorgeous on darker streets, gets you some stops back. I seldom Shoot UW so it'd be fine to me.



Bear in mind that, despite itinerary limits, if I were you I'd eventually end up in a camera store for film or other stuff somehow.
I personally ended up in m43 and should sometime upgrade to an EM or G series. Well sorted, in a small space one can carry large kit. Had a friend visiting with a 6D and sigma Art, and I carted the thing without battery juice for half a day.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #25
Skiff
Registered User
 
Skiff is offline
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Marks View Post
I am going to be in Tokyo for two weeks next month. I have almost as much fun putting together a kit for a trip, as I do actually going. Yeah . . . bit of a photo nut.

There are three camera choices before me, IQ is excellent in all three:

1) Leica M9/21-35-50-90. Pros: compact; cons: no IBIS, battery life marginal.
2) Nikon D3/21-50-105. Pros: great battery life; cons: heavy, no IBIS
3) Pentax K1/24-70(zoom), 50 (or 31/40/77). Pros: IBIS, better high ISO; cons: no ultrawide.

The Nikon is the old warhorse. Utterly dependable. I have a full selection of lenses -- no compromises on lens choice. It is heavy, but the battery will go for days. File sizes and resolution are moderate, by today's standards.
I will give you a complete different thought, from my own experience. And maybe you will hate me for that.....
I recommed the Nikon D3 (I have a D3s so I know this beast very well ).
You say the main disadvantage is the weight.
But in general when photographers today talking about camera weight they are often missing the essential point:
When you are walking around with your camera you are carrying
- your own body with its weight
- the camera and lens(es).
Body weight + camera equipment is the whole weight you have to "schlepp around". The Equipment is only a tiny percentage of this whole package. And the difference in weight between the Nikon and the Leica or Pentax for example is tiny in comparison to the whole weight you carry around. That are only some 100 grams.
The by far best way to carry less weight: Just loose some body weight. It is easy to loose 1-2 kilograms of fat.

I've experienced that by myself the hard way: Because of a hard time in my job and lots of stress and not enough time to do sports I've gotten 10 additional kilograms of body weight over some months.
That is the same as if I would carry a photo bag with 10 kilogramms of gear. With every single step I made! Very uncomfortable, and I got much sooner breathless because of the additional body weight.
It is the same result as always carrying a 10 kg Rucksack or 10 kg photobag.
After I reasiled that I started to change some things in my life and reduced my body weight.

And since then I have a complete different view on the "camera weight" topic. The differences in camera weights are negligible in comparison to the whole package (including body weight).
And most of us in the industrialised countries have too much body weight. So loosing 1-2 kg would be good in every case (improvind our health and general feeling) and that is much more of a difference as the difference between camera bodies or lenses.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #26
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiff View Post
Body weight + camera equipment is the whole weight you have to "schlepp around". The Equipment is only a tiny percentage of this whole package.
You're right of course, but I have to wonder if you do much walking carrying a camera bag.

I for one certainly notice the difference between carrying 1 kg of camera gear vs 2 kg of camera gear all day after a solid day walking around carrying it. Especially since the weight is all on one side of the body.

I walked 13 km (17,770 steps!) around Tokyo last Wednesday visiting photo galleries and camera shops. I carried one Leica MP with a 35mm lens. If I was carrying much more than that, I know I would have suffered back pain by the end of the day. YMMV.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #27
Skiff
Registered User
 
Skiff is offline
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 957
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonmanjiro View Post
You're right of course, but I have to wonder if you do much walking carrying a camera bag.

I for one certainly notice the difference between carrying 1 kg of camera gear vs 2 kg of camera gear all day after a solid day walking around carrying it. Especially since the weight is all on one side of the body.

I walked 13 km (17,770 steps!) around Tokyo last Wednesday visiting photo galleries and camera shops. I carried one Leica MP with a 35mm lens. If I was carrying much more than that, I know I would have suffered back pain by the end of the day. YMMV.
I do indeed quite a lot of walking around with a camera bag. And often more than 10 km per photography tour.
But then I don't use a one-sided camera bag. I've done that in former times and find it not to be good. Partly for the reason you have mentioned.
I am using for several years a LowePro flipside. Perfect solution. Wether you have 1kg or 2kg of photo gear in it, it does not matter. You don't feel the difference in a significant way. It is ideal for longer walking photo tours.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #28
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiff View Post
I am using for several years a LowePro flipside. Perfect solution.
A one sided camera bag isn't ideal, but for around 2/3 of the year Tokyo is too hot and/or humid for wearing a backpack to be comfortable.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #29
shawn
Registered User
 
shawn is offline
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,136
I'd probably go with the Leica and bring all the lens but maybe only carry a couple at a time during the trip. If you are comfortable wearing the camera on the strap get a small belt pouch to hold the lenses and a battery to travel light. By some cheap M rear lens caps and hot glue them back to back to more securely hold two lenses in a small bag without having them banging into each other.

Or put a Domke F5XA on your belt (and look a little ridiculous) and that should easily hold the M9 with a lens mounted and two more lens back to back. It does with my M240 and a 28,50,90 combo. I have a spare battery in there as well but it isn't needed with the M240. Getting the weight on your hips really helps to make it less obvious on full days of walking and someone can't as easily grab the bag from you.

Shawn
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #30
Pioneer
Registered User
 
Pioneer's Avatar
 
Pioneer is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Age: 65
Posts: 3,108
Your best option by far is the K1 and the 31mm Limited. Put the 77 Limited in your pocket if you think you might be somewhere where a longer focal length is useful (not common in Tokyo.) You may use it for a few portrait shots but the 31 is better if you want to incorporate some environment.
__________________
You gotta love a fast lens;

It is almost as good as a fast horse!
Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #31
Roger Hicks
Registered User
 
Roger Hicks is offline
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aquitaine
Posts: 23,947
M9, because that's how I'd get the best pictures. Two, three or four lenses: they don't weigh much. What normally gives YOU the best pictures? Have you no idea?

Cheeras,

R.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #32
Yokosuka_Mike
The Beat Goes On
 
Yokosuka_Mike's Avatar
 
Yokosuka_Mike is offline
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Yokosuka, Japan
Age: 64
Posts: 1,890
Don’t take any of your camera gear with you to Tokyo except some SD cards and maybe your favorite camera strap.

When you arrive in Tokyo buy a Fujifilm X-Pro2 camera and a Fujinon XF 23mm f2 R WR lens.

Have a great trip!

All the best,
Mike
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #33
shimokita
白黒
 
shimokita's Avatar
 
shimokita is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Japan, Tokyo
Posts: 749
Leica M9 with the Biogon 21/2.8 and Summilux 50/1.4 will cover most locations in the city.

Since you will have a base (hotel or other) in Tokyo and because you have a good rapport with the lens... take the Nockton 35/1.2... and depending on your interest there might be some situations where a tele lens would "work best", the Summicron 75/2 would do the trick. If it was me the 21/50 combination would be enough ; )

For interior low light I carry the Fuji x100t... a smart phone would also work and load the photo-to-translation app for menus etc.

Have a great trip.
Casey
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #34
ellisson
Registered User
 
ellisson's Avatar
 
ellisson is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Elkins Park, PA
Posts: 516
M9 and 35mm lens as your default shooter kit, extra battery and charger, data cards, and if you like a longer or shorter focal length, bring one extra lens. Keep it simple and small. Take a look at your “Keepers” from prior trips to get an idea what lenses (focal lengths) give you what you want.
__________________
Respice Finem

flickrgallery
Pbase gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-10-2018   #35
Ronald M
Registered User
 
Ronald M is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,486
M9 and buy an extra battery or two. Use it like a view camera, think before you shoot.

No need to take 25 pics of everything because it is free.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-23-2018   #36
ChicagoMatthew
Registered User
 
ChicagoMatthew is offline
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 20
I would do the M9 and the 35/90 combo... you'll keep the 35 on most of the time.. and pop the 90 on when you want a portrait... I have the 21 and its just VERY specific.. almost too much so... the 50 is a good middle ground... but if you have the 35, its not really worth a lens change IMO... but 35/90... that's a big difference.

Also! When you are in Tokyo, you have to visit this amazing photo book restaurant I went to... they have 1000s of books from all over the world, and the food is amazing. Link below!

Photo Book Dining Megutama
3 Chome-2-7 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tōkyō-to 150-0011, Japan

https://goo.gl/maps/epirvZXxByv

Matt
__________________
Instagram: matthewm2
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:12.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.