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View Poll Results: do you need protective filter
yes, a filter is always on my lens 249 60.44%
no, i don't need it 163 39.56%
Voters: 412. You may not vote on this poll

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Always Use Skylight, Rubber Hood, and Snap-on Cap.
Old 01-24-2014   #121
Nokton48
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Always Use Skylight, Rubber Hood, and Snap-on Cap.

Here are some medium and large format lenses I have recently acquired. I always add to each new lens, a good-quality Skylight Filter, Rubber Collapsible Lens Hood, and Snap-On Lenscap, just for peace-of-mind and protection. It's saved me from impact damage a few times I can recall.
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Old 01-24-2014   #122
Godfrey
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Just took the protective filter off the Summilux-R 50mm. It produced a noticeable softening/smearing.. Yet it's a very good quality filter.

Maybe I'll use it when I want a soft focus effect...

G
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Old 02-20-2014   #123
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I don't really feel the need of filter protection for my only Monochrom lens, but as I usually have either a B+W medium yellow or B+W orange filter aboard anyway, security is incidental.
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Old 03-11-2014   #124
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Click here to see what I saw when removing my camera from its bag after an air trip.

http://i975.photobucket.com/albums/a...i/DSCN1152.jpg

Now here to see how it looked after removing the filter.

http://i975.photobucket.com/albums/a...i/DSCN1154.jpg

Needless to say I immediately replaced the filter!
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Old 03-11-2014   #125
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An update to my earlier response, I keep cheap UV filters (Hoya HMC) on all my lenses but instead of unclipping lens caps, I unscrew the filters with the lens caps attached and set them aside. I've come to the (belated) realisation there's absolutely no point in putting a cheap $30 piece of glass in front of $2000 worth of glass.

For moisture, mud, or snow, I use B+W filters.
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Old 03-12-2014   #126
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I never use UV filters. As a few folks have pointed out, why add an extra piece of glass to a lens built to the exacting standards of an optical engineer. I use hoods on all my lenses for protection and always have the caps with me. I will use filters when needed for B&W - yellow and orange
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Old 03-25-2014   #127
Roger Hicks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LazyHammock View Post
I never use UV filters. As a few folks have pointed out, why add an extra piece of glass to a lens built to the exacting standards of an optical engineer. I use hoods on all my lenses for protection and always have the caps with me. I will use filters when needed for B&W - yellow and orange
The clue lies in the word "protective".

For a further clue, conduct tests for yourself and see when filters reduce image quality. When they do (and it's not often) -- take 'em off.

Finally, caps are great until you want to take pictures. Then, it's as well to leave 'em off. If you're taking pictures for several hours...

Cheers,

R.
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Old 03-25-2014   #128
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And caps with older Leica cameras are a classic way to shoot blanks. I don't particularly care about through the lens meters, but they do make a good lens cap warning device.
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Old 03-25-2014   #129
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It didn't seem to hurt people like Galen Rowell at all.
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Old 03-25-2014   #130
LazyHammock
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
The clue lies in the word "protective".

For a further clue, conduct tests for yourself and see when filters reduce image quality. When they do (and it's not often) -- take 'em off.

Finally, caps are great until you want to take pictures. Then, it's as well to leave 'em off. If you're taking pictures for several hours...

Cheers,

R.
Thanks for all the "clues" Roger. Testing under all lighting situations does not sound at all practical. I'll stick to using hoods for my lens protection rather than extraneous glass.

Finally, I should clarify that when I said I have the caps with me, they are in a pocket when I'm out shooting.
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Old 03-26-2014   #131
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I always use a hood (except my 90/4 Elmar) and a filter, preferably B+W filters. It gives me peace of mind, which is enough of a reason for me. Besides, I can't discern any noticeable loss of sharpness. My 21mm does sometimes flare in harsh, direct sunlight, but those are extreme circumstances.
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Old 04-27-2014   #132
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I answered yes but they're not always on the lens. In particular situations, such as a candlelit scene prone to ghosting, I'll take them off. Otherwise, I find them worthwhile on my pricey ASPH glass.
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Old 04-28-2014   #133
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Does not make much sense to keep a glass in front of some other glass to prevent damage. If something hits hard on your glass filter, it is most likely that it will damage your lens too. Dust and fingerprints are easy to be removed. Many people think that the slightest touch will damage the front element of their lenses, but they are much harder than they think.
I used to use clear filters found on lenses bought as protective caps whenever one was not available, but after a couple of clicks with them forgotten on I have stopped doing so.
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Old 04-29-2014   #134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikos72 View Post
If something hits hard on your glass filter, it is most likely that it will damage your lens too.
Check the image links on post #124. Others on this site have had similar experiences.
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Old 04-30-2014   #135
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No, a protective glass filter probably won't save your lens from damage in a car crash. Damage from a belt buckle or zipper? Yes, a $90 B&W probably will save that Noctilux.
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Old 04-30-2014   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
The clue lies in the word "protective".

For a further clue, conduct tests for yourself and see when filters reduce image quality. When they do (and it's not often) -- take 'em off.

Finally, caps are great until you want to take pictures. Then, it's as well to leave 'em off. If you're taking pictures for several hours...

Cheers,

R.
I agree, I had a m4/3 20mm lens that showed flare when using a protective filter so I took it off. Much later I noticed that the lens has gained a small scratch which thankfully doesn't affect the image. I continue to use a filter on my other lenses / cameras as I haven't encountered flare problems with them. I suspect that the cheaper the filter the more likely that flare will be an issue.
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Old 05-01-2014   #137
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....I didn't vote. Depends on the subject. I've shot at crazy concerts where alcohol hit my lens and killed spots on the coating. Same thing goes if you get too close to a graffiti artist. Also, when rain and dirt/dust is flying pretty bad, I'll use one. I take a lot of photos of my nieces too who throw stuff at me (snowballs, toys, dirt, stones) when I'm taking pictures of them. I never try to control the action, so I take precaution in these times. But landscape and most street stuff, I don't bother because it's relatively safe. So, 25% yes, 75% no.
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Old 05-20-2014   #138
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I use contrast filters on lenses when shooting B&W.
I use protective filters only:

- on lenses which are impossible to replace
- when I am shooting pictures in rain or dirt

I do not use UV filters but buy the best protective clear filters I can for a certain filter size, if I need one.

I feel the loss in sharpness and detail of a good filter is unimportant - I never saw the difference.
The issue with ghosts and reflections though is a real one and my sole reason, not to use filters, if I can.
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