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Old 06-04-2013   #81
ebolton
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I'm very happy with the heavy moderation that exists on the political stuff. I must admit I haven't added images to the gallery in a long time, and don't look at the gallery now. I tune in sometimes to catch the various discussions that go on in many fields. It seems to be more intelligent than I find elsewhere.
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Old 06-04-2013   #82
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I agree with most of what's been said.

Inclusive and open and civil !

The one thing I would like to see more of is inclusion of EXIF data for every photo posted!
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Old 06-04-2013   #83
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I'm very happy with the heavy moderation that exists on the political stuff.
... but that is a very, very American thing. To us Europeans, a civilized political discussion is a everyday matter, and many of our conservative parties are somewhere left of where the American definition of socialist begins (and the ruling party or coalition often is left of them).

On the other hand, constant salutes to the troops and flag are far more bizarre and irritating to us. Personally, I could do with less heavy-handed moderation of the former, and a bit more moderation of the latter whenever it spills into off-topic areas.
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Old 06-04-2013   #84
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... but that is a very, very American thing. To us Europeans, a civilized political discussion is a everyday matter, and many of our conservative parties are somewhere left of where the American definition of socialist begins (and the ruling party or coalition often is left of them).

On the other hand, constant salutes to the troops and flag are far more bizarre and irritating to us. Personally, I could do with less heavy-handed moderation of the former, and a bit more moderation of the latter whenever it spills into off-topic areas.


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Old 06-04-2013   #85
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RFF is a result of it's members, like other forums. I think if we try to limit it to say, Rangefinders, as the name suggests, then do people not get to talk about their latest Fuji device, or OM-D?
I say, unless it's causing a problem, let it be. If you don't want to read about a particular topic, don't open the thread.
It's a gear forum, nothing wrong with that. We all like gear.
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Old 06-04-2013   #86
Michael Markey
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... but that is a very, very American thing. To us Europeans, a civilized political discussion is a everyday matter,
On the other hand, constant salutes to the troops and flag are far more bizarre and irritating to us.
Not in the UK where it is still considered not polite to discuss politics in public.

As to the later ... it was once the case but now very common in the UK.

In my area alone there are now a number of flagpoles in gardens flying either the Union Jack or more commonly the flag of St George.

Commercial premises and pubs have them on display now all year `round.

I think that the moderation on RFF is both effective and balanced.
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Old 06-04-2013   #87
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Originally Posted by Michael Markey View Post
Not in the UK where it is still considered not polite to discuss politics in public.

As to the later ... it was once the case but now very common in the UK.

In my area alone there are now a number of flagpoles in gardens flying either the Union Jack or more commonly the flag of St George.

Commercial premises and pubs have them on display now all year `round.

I think that the moderation on RFF is both effective and balanced.


To a point I agree with that ... but occasionally it gets a little ridiculous IMO.
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Old 06-04-2013   #88
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Talking

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I can only draw two conclusions from the postings so far...
  1. Most people are pretty happy with the way things are
  2. We all need to remember that this is an international site - just consider each other's sensibilities and be polite

As many people would say, when I was a child, "it'll all be the same in a hundred years".

Were they correct?
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Old 06-04-2013   #89
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To a point I agree with that ... but occasionally it gets a little ridicuolous IMO.
Yes sometimes judgements are made which at times do seem odd.
That`s always going to be the case though given some of the subjects that come up and the different cultural backgrounds.

I don`t see this as a forum which should allow me to express anything that I feel like saying.

You couldn`t allow ,for example ,the time honoured practise of banter which you and I would understand but would sound very different to anyone reading the post

I think politeness and decorum has to always play a part in forums such as this.
For the majority I think it does.

For the rest the mods usually weed it out ...I often am surprised at how tolerant they are.
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Old 06-05-2013   #90
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Not in the UK where it is still considered not polite to discuss politics in public.
... but then the British as a whole may care less about politeness than their upper class believes. During my time in the UK (mostly in the Thatcher era) they certainly were quite vehemently political in public.
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Old 06-05-2013   #91
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... but then the British as a whole may care less about politeness than their upper class believes. During my time in the UK (mostly in the Thatcher era) they certainly were quite vehemently political in public.
I can't speak for perhaps older generations, but discussing politics is completely fair game in my peer group.

I think that's basically because although younger people may care about issues, they seem to care far less about party politics. I could have a group of friends, all voting for different parties, discussing their merits, but it would be 100% civil, as in the end, we don't really care.

Whether the UK gets a Labour or Conservative Government next time around does not seem to excite the interest of anyone I know. The parties differ on little, and it would seem to make scant difference to policy or our lives.
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Old 06-05-2013   #92
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I agree with most of what's been said.

Inclusive and open and civil !

The one thing I would like to see more of is inclusion of EXIF data for every photo posted!
Could be difficult, given how many people here shoot film.

Cheers,

R.
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Old 06-05-2013   #93
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Originally Posted by Michael Markey View Post
Not in the UK where it is still considered not polite to discuss politics in public.

As to the later ... it was once the case but now very common in the UK.

In my area alone there are now a number of flagpoles in gardens flying either the Union Jack or more commonly the flag of St George.

Commercial premises and pubs have them on display now all year `round.

I think that the moderation on RFF is both effective and balanced.
It is where I come from, and among the people I know. It is true that a few people have what I regard as a an "American" attitude, and refuse to discuss politics, but they are hardly numerous. Most of them are covered by the old saying, "My mind is made up. Do not confuse me with the facts." Of course this applies to many other subjects than politics, including, yes, choice of rangefinder camera.

Dunno how old thegman is but I'm 63 next week and my great-grandmother ardently discussed politics until her death at 85 or so in the 1960s, so it ain't just young people. Likewise, party politics doesn't necessarily excite older people. I joined the Young Liberals in 1966 and voted liberal for many years but I wouldn't give you tuppence for the current so-called Liberal Democrat party. Chat-show Charlie was the last credible Liberal leader.

Cheers,

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Old 06-05-2013   #94
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The most interesting threads in the past years that I have been a member here were to me:

Keith's thread on the scanned negatives of a 1930's world voyage
Bill Pierce's forum threads
TightSqueeze's thread on his deployment to Iraq
The wartime Sonnar and German wartime camera thread
The Turkey threads
The historical Leica threads (particularly in the LTM forum)
Many street photography threads, though not all
John's thread with his coverage on the Syria conflict

All in all, I consider the rangefinder camera's and Compact System camera's to be particularly valuable when it comes to photo journalism, street photography and travel.

IMHO all the rest is nice but not 'core business'.

Guess I'd like RFF to be a forum that centers on (the reporter camera's that were, are and will be used to record) news and daily life, both near and far.

I'm not that interested in lens characteristics, sensor specifications, paint jobs and coverings, bags and straps anymore. But it took me quite some time to grow out of it and I can therefore see why others are into it. And that's okay.


Mods, you people are doing a great job in keeping RFF a positive place. Thanks for that! Pls keep up the good work!
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Old 06-05-2013   #95
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Dear Roger

Happy birthday.
I`ll be 63 in November.

As to political discussion or lack thereof , perhaps its a hang over from my years as a Civil Servant where any form of political opinion was considered a disciplinary offence.

Maybe its conditioned by the area where I currently reside which is predominantly Conservative .

Staunch is usually the adjective which describes this state of affairs.

The old saying that you could pin a blue rosette on a donkey and they`d still vote for it has yet to be disproved.
Here Cameron is considered hopeless left wing ,a wet in the old jargon.

I`m reminded that you originally hail from the west country.
I think it true to say that the area has always been predominantly liberal ...in the English sense ... and I`m not surprised that active political debate was/is perhaps more the norm.

Best

Michael
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Old 06-05-2013   #96
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... wet enough to shoot snipe off?
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Old 06-05-2013   #97
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I'm a bit younger than you two. I came to maturity in the 80s in Derby and Sheffield, experiencing the shutdown of steel and engineering companies, the miners strike, and grinding poverty first hand, as well as grassroots politics, the growth of new communities, the green and peace movements etc. Politics is just a normal part of everything, and it is hard to imagine conversations which don't include some politics at least.

For example, I work in the NHS, and, every day, we are struggling with the effects of cuts. My life at work, at home, with friends, and travelling on the roads on my bike is suffused with politics, of course it is, and it would be really weird not to acknowledge that.

Every photograph I take has a political aspect, even if it is not made with a political or campaigning intent, there is a context to the selection of every image. Undoubtedly.

I admit, as a Northerner, I see politics rather differently from someone in a true blue area (though the safest seat in the UK for the Tories is in North Yorkshire, my home county, to our eternal shame). But being allowed to air those differences through words and images can enhance understanding and cut through divisions.
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Old 06-05-2013   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevo View Post
... but then the British as a whole may care less about politeness than their upper class believes. During my time in the UK (mostly in the Thatcher era) they certainly were quite vehemently political in public.

I would agree ,those were turbulent times and it would be silly of me to suggest that the English are not political.

But here you may be judging the UK ...well as the UK
I think it true to say that the Scottish , Irish and Welsh have always been more politically demonstrative than the English.

You only need listen to parliamentary debates and you can hear that .

It was the English who I had in mind when I made that statement.

As in all things that too is changing.
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Old 06-05-2013   #99
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Ohh..forgot in my last post in this thread:

Thank you so much to Stephen, Jorge and the mods for making RFF what it is!
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Old 06-05-2013   #100
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Originally Posted by Rodchenko View Post
I'm a bit younger than you two. I came to maturity in the 80s in Derby and Sheffield, experiencing the shutdown of steel and engineering companies, the miners strike, and grinding poverty first hand, as well as grassroots politics, the growth of new communities, the green and peace movements etc. Politics is just a normal part of everything, and it is hard to imagine conversations which don't include some politics at least.

For example, I work in the NHS, and, every day, we are struggling with the effects of cuts. My life at work, at home, with friends, and travelling on the roads on my bike is suffused with politics, of course it is, and it would be really weird not to acknowledge that.

Every photograph I take has a political aspect, even if it is not made with a political or campaigning intent, there is a context to the selection of every image. Undoubtedly.

I admit, as a Northerner, I see politics rather differently from someone in a true blue area (though the safest seat in the UK for the Tories is in North Yorkshire, my home county, to our eternal shame). But being allowed to air those differences through words and images can enhance understanding and cut through divisions.
My experience too more or less, but in the 60s for me ... Grammar School exposed me to the other side of the coin, even if the uniform was a bit of a brick-magnet were I lived ... I don't always understand why people are so partisan online sometimes
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Old 06-05-2013   #101
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Originally Posted by Rodchenko View Post
I'm a bit younger than you two. I came to maturity in the 80s in Derby and Sheffield, experiencing the shutdown of steel and engineering companies, the miners strike, and grinding poverty first hand, as well as grassroots politics, the growth of new communities, the green and peace movements etc. Politics is just a normal part of everything, and it is hard to imagine conversations which don't include some politics at least.

For example, I work in the NHS, and, every day, we are struggling with the effects of cuts. My life at work, at home, with friends, and travelling on the roads on my bike is suffused with politics, of course it is, and it would be really weird not to acknowledge that.

Every photograph I take has a political aspect, even if it is not made with a political or campaigning intent, there is a context to the selection of every image. Undoubtedly.

I admit, as a Northerner, I see politics rather differently from someone in a true blue area (though the safest seat in the UK for the Tories is in North Yorkshire, my home county, to our eternal shame). But being allowed to air those differences through words and images can enhance understanding and cut through divisions.

I agree and if posts were as measured as this is it could ,in my opinion , only enhance the forum.
Sadly some aren`t.
As a matter of record , I`m a northerner too and have spent my entire career in the public sector (health ).
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Old 06-05-2013   #102
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even if the uniform was a bit of a brick-magnet were I lived ... I don't always understand why people are so partisan online sometimes

At least it taught you to be quick on your feet...
I agree with the last bit too.
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Old 06-05-2013   #103
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I can't help reading through this thread and seeing it as a fairly accurate representation of RFF as a whole.
One or two comments taken as a barb whether meant as such or not, lots of differing opinions and beliefs that originate from the various experiences and cultures we have been party to as individuals. On the whole these are expressed with some level of care and thought for an international audience as well as following the old maxim of treating others as we wish to be treated. The result appears to be that with discussion dissenting voices come closer together, in understanding if not in agreement. Can we realistically ask for more from such a diverse group of people?

A quick comment on the political aspect of Brits that has become a slight side issue. My great grandmother on the 'posh' southern side of my family was a part of the Suffragette movement and my great grandmother on my Geordie (NE England) side of the family was the real power and motivator behind my great grandfather's Miner's Union work. I think, as thegman said, the only difference now is young people are less interested in party politics; social politics is as vehemently debated as ever.
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Old 06-05-2013   #104
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I don't always understand why people are so partisan online sometimes
I think some photographers can be very partisan, just look at places like apug where although there is a fantastic wealth of knowledge amongst its userbase, a lot of 'helpful' responses come off as being rude in tone or untolerant to other approaches or philosophies. Perhaps this is a symptom of the nature of photography, where with technical processes there are areas where things are very black and white (no pun intended), as well as probably attracting people of a technical mind.

I think as mentioned above, the anonymity of the web then only enables the righteous-minded or angry to abandon any cloak of civility online. At least thats my take on it, plus think a lot of the anger seen on the web tends to be from those defending themselves from what they see as an affront to the beliefs/ choices/ way of life.

Moderation is necessary I think, and a tough gig. As in sport though, my favourite referees are the ones who know use the red card only when absolutely needed, and at their best are a key element of the collaborative dance with the players to ensure the game reaches its highest potential. No one wants a game that ends with only half the players, yet at the same time no one wants one that descends into chaos. Thats key for me, I guess, and a tough balance.
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Old 06-05-2013   #105
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Old 06-05-2013   #106
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I can't help reading through this thread and seeing it as a fairly accurate representation of RFF as a whole.
One or two comments taken as a barb whether meant as such or not, lots of differing opinions and beliefs that originate from the various experiences and cultures we have been party to as individuals. On the whole these are expressed with some level of care and thought for an international audience as well as following the old maxim of treating others as we wish to be treated. The result appears to be that with discussion dissenting voices come closer together, in understanding if not in agreement. Can we realistically ask for more from such a diverse group of people?

A quick comment on the political aspect of Brits that has become a slight side issue. My great grandmother on the 'posh' southern side of my family was a part of the Suffragette movement and my great grandmother on my Geordie (NE England) side of the family was the real power and motivator behind my great grandfather's Miner's Union work. I think, as thegman said, the only difference now is young people are less interested in party politics; social politics is as vehemently debated as ever.
Dear Simon,

Fascinating family history, by the way. But then, most family histories are. My great-great grandfather was a very, very rich man -- the owner of a major iron foundry -- who lost his money on the grand scale, as was far easier in Victorian England. His daughter Flo (my great-grandmother) joined the Party in 1917. Her children (my grandmother, aunts and uncles) were hard-left socialists -- the sort that regarded Wedgie Benn as a dangerous revisionist -- and my father started out on the left of the Conservative Party and now (at 86 next week) is on the right of it. And I joined the Young Liberals at sixteen (partly because there were girls there).

Cheers,

R.
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Old 06-05-2013   #107
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i would love more photo related discussions here but the bag threads seem much more popular for some reason.

it is easier to say i don't like this bag than to say i don't like this image...i guess.
Bags, equipment are "safe" subjects open for discussion. To discuss or critique someone's image is less so. I feel that sometimes people are a bit too "nice" in their discussions of someone's images. A little open criticism, within reason, can go long way.

Politics, as Roger said, is part of life. To insult someone by their religious, ethnic background, etc., should not be tolerated, especially in this day and age. I am sorry, but I think those who post hate and vitrol, should be banned from this site. There are plenty of other forums on the internet for them to voice their feeble comments.
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Old 06-05-2013   #108
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I think some photographers can be very partisan, just look at places like apug where although there is a fantastic wealth of knowledge amongst its userbase, a lot of 'helpful' responses come off as being rude in tone or untolerant to other approaches or philosophies. Perhaps this is a symptom of the nature of photography, where with technical processes there are areas where things are very black and white (no pun intended), as well as probably attracting people of a technical mind.

I think as mentioned above, the anonymity of the web then only enables the righteous-minded or angry to abandon any cloak of civility online. At least thats my take on it, plus think a lot of the anger seen on the web tends to be from those defending themselves from what they see as an affront to the beliefs/ choices/ way of life.

Moderation is necessary I think, and a tough gig. As in sport though, my favourite referees are the ones who know use the red card only when absolutely needed, and at their best are a key element of the collaborative dance with the players to ensure the game reaches its highest potential. No one wants a game that ends with only half the players, yet at the same time no one wants one that descends into chaos. Thats key for me, I guess, and a tough balance.
... well that's what I'm saying, I'm not responsible for any of that, I go by my real name and just speak my mind and try to be truthful ... I've never understood why folk pay such attention to these anonymous people
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Old 06-05-2013   #109
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When I joined, back in the olden days, it was 99% Rfs and 99.8% film. The Contax G2 was only grudgingly accepted as a valid tool and the Epson R-D1 was thought of as a passing fad of little interest. RFF was a closer knit community then, a product of size and narrow interest (the gear and film rather than the individual beliefs). Threads were generally good natured although there were one or two major trolls (anyone remember Frank - not FrankS). The leica M8 burst into the forum and the membership increased dramatically and tolerance levels diminished, primarily as a result of the film versus digital threads. More general interests (gear) became acceptable and we even embraced SLRs There were rarely any discussions about politics or religion, but when there were, they usually descended into vitriolic personal exchanges and expulsions. I can do without the politics and the religion, but have no problem if discussions are civil. Invariably they start out fine but end in the same place with polarised views and a lack of understanding. Arguing about semantics is meaningless . I like it as it is, anything in moderation.
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Old 06-05-2013   #110
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I was reading this forum (not posting) when Frank was here. It astounded me then (and still does) that someone would go to such lengths as to set up a parody website just to gain revenge on those he thought had wronged him. Much worse than anything happening now.

RFF was the source of good info on some rangefinder cameras I had purchased way back then, and remains a great source of gear insight as well as general reading in photography. A big thanks to the moderators for keeping things from getting out of hand!
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Old 06-05-2013   #111
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Arguing that discussions about politics and religion end up as slanging matches, and should therefore be banned as soon as possible, is a bit like saying we all die and therefore nothing we do is of any consequence. It's not the end that necessarily matters: it's the exchange of views on the way. Barring exchanges of views is... well, it's what Erdogan is trying to do in Turkey at the moment.

Of course Stephen can ban anything he likes. It's his forum. But given that the title of this thread is "What do you want RFF to be", this is a good thread to discuss the role of politics in everything, including photography. "Every act is a political act" including restricting photography to kittens and coffee cups...

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Old 06-05-2013   #112
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Overall, the RFF has kept my interest for quite a while now and this is, for me, entirely because of the diverse group of people and their opinions.
I certainly do not agree with all of those opinions nor do I expect that they would agree with mine.

I do have strong opinions on, well most things, in fact but I have gained enough perspective to know that my opinions are not facts.
I have learned much from the "gear" threads but I have learned a bit more from the many "image" threads.

So, what do I want RFF to be?
Mostly what it is now, actually. Inclusive as broadly as possible, exclusive only where necessary*, and ongoing.

On a practical note, I wonder if simply disabling the "quick reply" button would ameliorate much of the excess?
Rob


*I do remember that other Frank and that's an example of necessary exclusion, I think.
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Old 06-05-2013   #113
anjoca76
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Arguing that discussions about politics and religion end up as slanging matches, and should therefore be banned as soon as possible, is a bit like saying we all die and therefore nothing we do is of any consequence. It's not the end that necessarily matters: it's the exchange of views on the way. Barring exchanges of views is... well, it's what Erdogan is trying to do in Turkey at the moment.

Of course Stephen can ban anything he likes. It's his forum. But given that the title of this thread is "What do you want RFF to be", this is a good thread to discuss the role of politics in everything, including photography. "Every act is a political act" including restricting photography to kittens and coffee cups...

Cheers,

R.
There is a very wide gulf between political discussions and "kittens and coffee cups," let's be honest. It doesn't have to be, nor is it, that extreme. Asking, or even insisting, that political discussions (which almost immediately devolve into arguments and hurt feelings) be a minimal presence here does not dumb-down RFF to kittens and coffee cups.

Plain and simple, political discourse makes many uncomfortable, including most of the people I know in my life, and if too many feel uncomfortable and don't come here any longer, that is a bad thing for those of us who enjoy all of the other aspects of RFF.

I also do not in any way agree that politics is at the core of photography. Discussing politics for politics' sake...I get enough of that everywhere else--and believe me, I'm a politics junkie. But I don't come here for that and would be really turned off it ended up being that way. And from the 5 pages of responses, it's very clear that the overwhelming majority of members don't want that either.

In other words, if forced to choose between politics or kittens and coffee cups on RFF, I'm choosing the latter.
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Old 06-05-2013   #114
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And that would be a political choice.
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Old 06-05-2013   #115
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Good things about RFF:

1) I have never had a technical question that did not receive a helpful response on RFF. Please do not discourage people from being 'gear heads'. As a whole our society suffers from a lack of technical knowledge. (Too many people imagine they are 'advanced' because they have a smart phone - for all they know it runs on vacuum tubes.)

2) I like the gallery very much, many contributors provide images that set a high standard.

3) People on the forum are intelligent and opinionated, and I like the political component that seeps into a large share of the threads. Unlike many Americans, I do not take offense at people whose viewpoints differ dramatically from mine - they are just misguided, after all.

4) The moderators do a wonderful job.

5) There is no shortage of contests, challenges, etc to provide incentive to try something different, or at least shoot with a purpose.

I have been too swamped as of late to spend much time with RFF, but I would be very upset to see anything happen to it. It is my only online home.

Randy
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Old 06-05-2013   #116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbg32 View Post
Politics, as Roger said, is part of life. To insult someone by their religious, ethnic background, etc., should not be tolerated, especially in this day and age. I am sorry, but I think those who post hate and vitrol, should be banned from this site. There are plenty of other forums on the internet for them to voice their feeble comments.
Totally agree.

Yet - am I really too rousseauist ? - I can't find those "who post hate and vitrol" yet. I actually never read their posts here, nor can I drop some nicknames at the moment.

So there is no perish risk for the forum IMO. This is remaining an excellent forum in spite of its very large baselength.
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Old 06-05-2013   #117
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I joined RFF very recently, as I finally acquired my first rangefinder (well, actually, six of them... long-ish and not very interesting story). And I've seen references to various useful topics here in the discussion threads of a couple of Flickr film groups, so it seemed like a good place to join.

I do like, though, that it's not just rangefinders - there's plenty of discussion of SLRs, TLRs, and other things here too. While it's nice to have a place with all the accumulated knowledge about rangefinders, I really appreciate all the other information and discussions here. Yes, it moves fast and I find it really easy to "lose" topics (without subscribing to them), but that's ok.

So - to answer the original question - I'm ok with RFF just as it is. I can ignore topics I'm not interested in, no problem.
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Old 06-05-2013   #118
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I joined RFF after discovering it via Brian Sweeney and Raid and the old ZI forum. Other than those guys online in my personal photography milieu I was a film shooter of old Zeiss SLR cameras amongst a bunch of Nikon and Canon DSLR shooters. Those folks never held it against me and still don't but I was out to learn the fundamentals and figured the key to becoming a good digital photographer someday was to learn and really understand the f stops and etc. So I read and read and read a bunch of these RFF threads and I practiced and I learned stuff. Thanks guys that is what you have done for me. I now own several RF cameras (more RF than SLR now) BTW but I am increasingly more of a digital user. If they could just make a digital camera with a viewfinder like my old F2 DE-1 I would be really happy.

Moderation is a necessary thing but I have always thought that just deleting something without any explanation or warning was sort of crass. I think a gentle "I am watching you" as I once heard Godfrey say is a great way to moderate things. It seems to be a way of asserting one's authority without having to assert one's authority if that makes any sense.

The thing about RFF which I feel is it's prime strength and the reason it is one of the best if not the best photography forums on the net is the knowledge of it's membership. Just incredible. It reminds me of a particular fish forum of which I am a member. That place is a place where one can actually have an online discussion with heavy hitter fish people like Heiko Bleher for example. They actually find the time to interact with forum members and these are the guys that write the books and magazine articles and are the authorities in their field. Same thing here at RFF. I can pick up a magazine and read an article by Roger and Frances..or I could PM him if I wanted/needed to...that kind of thing just blows my mind. And the rest of you are just phenomenal in your own right too.

I don't think anyone could want for something better really and I don't know if that would be possible anyways.
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Old 06-05-2013   #119
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I think it is mostly a gear forum, just compare the number of view of the "How to" with that of the "Leica Forum". For me this is ok, there are great sites about other stuff so one can get to other places for different discussions. Now which kind of gear is to be discussed it is tricky because rangefinder cameras are now a niche product or are antique cameras and a lot of other stuff come to replace them but I would say that it should be mostly about "small cameras" whatever that means, so yes to Micro4/3 but no to digital backs, there is a gray line (lights for example which could in principle be used with any camera but in practice are not very "rangefinderish") but mostly we know what is what. As for politics and other stuff it is hard to keep it out, I have seen politics appearing into discussion about food photography, you know, you put a small bowl upside down below a soup and you are "showing a distorted reality in order to support a capitalistic soup vendor and cheat poor soup consumers". In this regard I think that letting people decide to which threads they take part is better than a strict moderation.

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Old 06-05-2013   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
It's good like it is.

Sure there are a few people here who like to argue meaningless points until they run out of oxygen and there is a little sniping in threads between individuals occasionally but it doesn't dominate the place. Most members enjoy the place for what it is and go about their business in a friendly helpful manner. You tend to notice the nasty stuff because it's not the norm and it stands out!

Apart from which as a group we display typical group dynamics in that we don't all get on with each other all the time ... nothing unusual there IMO.

The quality of the photography is what makes this place different ... try p.net and you'll soon find yourself drowning in over saturated, over processed images that will make your lip curl! The work here is generally very earthy and connected to realty by comparison IMO.
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Originally Posted by Keith View Post
As for politics ... I can live without having to deal with that stuff here ... it's everywhere else and little is achieved by hammering it within a camera/photography forum.
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzardkid View Post
The most interesting threads in the past years that I have been a member here were to me:

Keith's thread on the scanned negatives of a 1930's world voyage
Bill Pierce's forum threads
TightSqueeze's thread on his deployment to Iraq
The wartime Sonnar and German wartime camera thread
The Turkey threads
The historical Leica threads (particularly in the LTM forum)
Many street photography threads, though not all
John's thread with his coverage on the Syria conflict

All in all, I consider the rangefinder camera's and Compact System camera's to be particularly valuable when it comes to photo journalism, street photography and travel.

IMHO all the rest is nice but not 'core business'.

Guess I'd like RFF to be a forum that centers on (the reporter camera's that were, are and will be used to record) news and daily life, both near and far.

I'm not that interested in lens characteristics, sensor specifications, paint jobs and coverings, bags and straps anymore. But it took me quite some time to grow out of it and I can therefore see why others are into it. And that's okay.


Mods, you people are doing a great job in keeping RFF a positive place. Thanks for that! Pls keep up the good work!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob-F View Post
I'd like to list just a few of the hundreds of things that make this a great site. Fell free to add lots more.

Chris Crawford's pictures, and all the help he gives.

Tom A, for his knowledge, help, entertaining comments, and his sense of humor.

Back Alley Joe for his inexhaustible range of interests: bags; practically every new digital camera from the Epson R-D1 forward; endless ideas for new thread topics (watches, knives, etc.)

New thread topics like watches, knives, and stuff.

Raid, for all he contributes

Helen, for all she contributes

Keith, for all he contributes

Roger Hicks for all the time and energy he puts in here, even though he has many other things to do.

Bill Pierce, for sharing his thoughts with us.

I think it's the people that make this forum what it is.

It's about rangefinders and photography with rangefinders.

It's about SLRs, DSLRs; tiny digital cameras; and photography with those.

And a lot of gear talk we use to distract ourselves from everyday ennui.

It's a community, that's what.

I would not change a thing. It's as close as anything will ever get to being all things to all people.
Above are things that I would wish to have been smart enough to say if I had gotten in before those posters. I have been interested in all the comments for that matter. There were a lot of good ones besides the ones quoted above.

Personally, I am well satisfied with RFF being the way it is. I enjoy the gear threads, and the photos shown whether in the gallery or threads. Some threads I get in and out of in a hurry, but some of those get to be quite popular with other members. I think that is good for all of us. There are things that each of us can relate to and contribute to. And enjoy.

I approve of the moderation. I generally understand and agree. The few times I haven't understood, I have accepted the decision. It isn't my site and I am not a mod, and don't want to be. To all mods, a tip of the hat to you, past and present. I appreciate you.

I can't imagine any changes the head bartender would want to make causing me to leave. But as I said, I am well satisfied with it as it is as well.
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