Colour film for a long trip.. Velvia 50 (and K64)
Old 05-19-2013   #1
Bruno Gracia
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Colour film for a long trip.. Velvia 50 (and K64)

Hi there!

I have been watching videos and pictures made with Kodachrome 64.. what a beauty, sadly it's not possible to produce it anymore

And I'm wondering if the Velvia 50 is in some terms close in contrast and colours to this film.. I love much more the slide than negatives and I will do a very long trip for south Asia or Caribe, We don't know still.. with my leica M6 with 35 cron (don't know yet if asph or IV, which is better for colour?), and the FM2 with the 105 2.5 ..

Any suggestion in colour film?
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Old 05-19-2013   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno Gracia View Post
Hi there!

I have been watching videos and pictures made with Kodachrome 64.. what a beauty, sadly it's not possible to produce it anymore

And I'm wondering if the Velvia 50 is in some terms close in contrast and colours to this film.. I love much more the slide than negatives and I will do a very long trip for south Asia or Caribe, We don't know still.. with my leica M6 with 35 cron (don't know yet if asph or IV, which is better for colour?), and the FM2 with the 105 2.5 ..

Any suggestion in colour film?
Kodachrome is to Velvia as Renoir is to a cartoonist. Velvia is super saturated (overly so in my opinion).

I stopped shooting slides over 25 years ago. Modern negative emulsions like Portra give so much more to work with in sharpness and exposure latitude...

G
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Old 05-19-2013   #3
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Velvia 100 is beautiful for travel and landscapes. I love the saturated colors! And the 35 cron asph is a perfect match for this film, incredible color and resolution even wide open, you can shoot into light without any worry about flare, worth every penny. Velvia 50 is beautiful too but you lose a stop, so your preference should be what stop you mainly shoot at, wider apertures would benefit from the speed of the 50 film. You really need to nail the exposure with slide film, I had no problem with the exposure meter in the m6, but remember to expose for the highlights, otherwise the colors will become washed out, this is the opposite of c41 and black and white film. Enjoy shooting slide film!

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Old 05-19-2013   #4
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Thank You both!

So.. for color film (slide or negative) it does exists a real advantage shooting the Asph instead the IV? And what about black and white?
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Old 05-19-2013   #5
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I don't think you would see the difference in black and white unless you were shooting extremely fine grained film into a light source wide open
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Old 05-19-2013   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno Gracia View Post
Thank You both!

So.. for color film (slide or negative) it does exists a real advantage shooting the Asph instead the IV? And what about black and white?
For slide film, with its low ISO you want a lens that is sharp at wide apertures; with black and white film you want a low contrast and high resolution lens.

If you don't shoot slide film at a decent shutter speed, you're going to lose the edges and acuity, so keep the shutter speed twice the focal length and open the aperture.


for 35mm 1/60, and min 1/25.
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Old 05-19-2013   #7
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Bruno, there will be a lot of light, down there... So, I'd choose Velvia 50 which is, at least in my opinion, a little better than Velvia 100 (deeper yellows, no magenta cast, etc) for landscape and nature. Besides, with a "slower" slide, you won't be obliged to close the diaphragm too much at noon, in particular with your M6.
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Old 05-19-2013   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Etabeta View Post
Bruno, there will be a lot of light, down there... So, I'd choose Velvia 50 which is, at least in my opinion, a little better than Velvia 100 (deeper yellows, no magenta cast, etc) for landscape and nature. Besides, with a "slower" slide, you won't be obliged to close the diaphragm too much at noon, in particular with your M6.
But the tricky part with slide film is to shoot when there is not 'too much' light.
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Old 05-19-2013   #9
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You're right but I'm not a landscape or nature shooter, just people or some colour textures

Here in London.. with the cloudy days is most difficult than my country (south Spain).
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Old 05-19-2013   #10
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I would imagine Provia might be closer to Kodachrome than Velvia, but Velvia is great in it's own right. For me, Velvia is my "go to" film for travelling in places of natural beauty.
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Old 05-19-2013   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno Gracia View Post
You're right but I'm not a landscape or nature shooter, just people or some colour textures

Here in London.. with the cloudy days is most difficult than my country (south Spain).
People are even more tricky with slide film because people move and when things move, shutter speed increase is even more important - unless of course you freeze people into a dead stare - Steve McCurry approach.


Negative film is always better for people because you're not going to destroy skin tones with high contrast and saturation of slide film - especially Valvia.
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Old 05-19-2013   #12
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Sensia 100, if you can find any, would be one of the best E6 choices. Otherwise Provia 100F. Velvia has many virtues, but portraiture is not one of its strong points. You can do portraiture with slide if you want to. Granted, neg has some advantages, but if transparency is what you love, go for it. How quickly we forget that generations of magazine photographers somehow managed to get by with reversal films for people photography until just a decade or so ago; it can be done.
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Old 05-19-2013   #13
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Thanks guys, Actually my favourite one is Provia 100F, some images with portra 400, first time using it!




Yellow man por Bruno Gracia, en Flickr



bus worker por Bruno Gracia, en Flickr



Sri Lanka President por Bruno Gracia, en Flickr
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Old 05-19-2013   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno Gracia View Post
Thank You both!

So.. for color film (slide or negative) it does exists a real advantage shooting the Asph instead the IV? And what about black and white?
Lenses see differently. I'm not familiar enough with the subtle differences between "IV" and "ASPH" to make much of a recommendation.

Basically, since I only rarely have more than one or two lenses in a particular focal length, and I only very rarely carry more than one focal length at a time, I use what I have and, knowing it, adjust what I shoot accordingly.

Too much time spent trying to analyze what might be "best" for an unknown situation leads to a paralysis...

G
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Old 05-19-2013   #15
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yes Godfrey.. more photography and books and less equipment.. Less is More.
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Old 05-19-2013   #16
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What about the Ektachrome for the skin tones?
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Old 05-19-2013   #17
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ektachrome e 100g or provia 100f are excellent for skin tones, astia 100f is even better if you can find any.

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Old 05-19-2013   #18
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Porta 160.... Love the palatte, so Painterly
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Old 05-19-2013   #19
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Astia 100F is fantastic for people, but I now use Provia 400X. Skin tones are where they should be. I've pretty well neglected my C-41 stock because of that one film.
I also found Velvia 100 was better than 50 if there are people in the frame - but 50 is better for everything else.








These were shot on Astia 100F at around 1400 in the very harsh Aussie summer sun.
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Old 05-19-2013   #20
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Try to find Agfa Precisa 100. I bought it recently in UK via ebay. Great unexpensive slide film. Otherwise Provia 100F is ideal.
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Old 05-20-2013   #21
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Thank You all.

I have been trying agfa precisa for a while but.. too orange for me.

I Think the provia will be the best option!

is the Astia discontinued?
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Old 05-20-2013   #22
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Both provia 100f and 400 are outstanding. Beautiful colors, great for skin tone, sharp, very little grain, and excellent tonality. Provia is my favorite color film.

But for landscapes in the right light, Velvia is king.
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Old 05-20-2013   #23
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Agfa Precisa CT very likely is Provia 100F: http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...d.php?t=119594
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Old 05-20-2013   #24
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Yes Astia has been discontinued sadly, the various Sensia types, also. There may be a little still to be found if you check around, one of my local stores was still selling out some Sensia 100 stocks just a few months back, which was said to be closer to Astia than Provia. The few portraits I made with Sensia were very satisfactory (which is why I suggested it) but if you can locate a few rolls of Astia in 35mm (discontinued before Astia in larger formats was completely killed off, so harder to find, IIRC?) so much the better for you. I think you will probably have to settle for Provia 100 or 400 (or, maybe, Sensia if you can find a few rolls of that).
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Old 05-20-2013   #25
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Thank You guys!

I Don't know but I find AGFA too much warmer or.. with orange tones, isn't it?
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Old 05-20-2013   #26
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iīm a portra fan, but i kind of like ektar as well, you should check it out if you havenīt done that already.
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Old 05-20-2013   #27
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If I were going on holidays and could only choose from the currently produced transparency films, I would take Velvia 50 for landscapes and Provia 400X for everything else. If it had to be one film only it would be 400X. I've finally bought some in 120 after loving it in 135 and can't wait to try it out in the larger format.

For interest, check out these fine photos from forum member tsiklonaut:

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...&postcount=802

Edge code RVP50 is Velvia 50 and RXP is Provia 400X. Good idea of what they can do.
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Old 05-20-2013   #28
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Most people are raving about neutral films here.

If you want a little unusual color palette, then use velvia 50 there sure is more to this film than pure saturation, it's also how the yellows, blues and reds shift.

Kodak Ektar 100 will also give you a nice palette response.

None of them are really suited for caucatian skin, as they can give a color cast.

For people, as a neutral film, provia 100f is
IMO the best film out there, the resolution beats porta into a pulp. (Porta is IMO the best negative color film for people though).
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Old 05-20-2013   #29
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Thank You very much to everybody.

I have a question.. for color film, how expired is expired? I mean.. I have provia 100f , 8 rolls from 2009 which I bought to a guy who has been keeping in the freeze..
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Old 05-20-2013   #30
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Provia 100 with a skylight 1B filter because otherwise the color balance is a little cool for me. I deeply mourn the passing of Astia and Sensia. Many people love Velvia for landscapes, but it's too contrasty for photographing people, in my opinion. Whatever slide film you use, be sure to bracket your exposures. You will likely find that you prefer the slide that's technically one-half stop underexposed. Overexposed slides are pretty much throwaways.
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Old 05-20-2013   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno Gracia View Post
I have a question.. for color film, how expired is expired? I mean.. I have provia 100f , 8 rolls from 2009 which I bought to a guy who has been keeping in the freeze..
It's probably okay. Shoot one roll and have it processed. If it looks good, the others are pretty sure to be good as well, if they all have the same expiration date and have been stored in the same manner.
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Old 05-20-2013   #32
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I still have bricks of virgin KC64 in the deep freezer. Is there any more possible method to develop them ?
If you find someplace to process your K64, please let us know.
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Old 05-20-2013   #33
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Provia (100F and 400X) are great films. For more saturation I find the Velvia 50 to be much better than Velvia 100 as it has larger 'dynamic range' and warmer colors. See the film comparison by Tim Parker HERE.

Of course - if the sun is high Ektar 100 or Even Portra films give great results.
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Old 05-20-2013   #34
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Thanks , I love this forum!

By the way, I have a Coolscan V... One day a Hasselblad, For sure the slide has a lot of DMAX..
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Old 05-20-2013   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruno Gracia View Post
Thank You very much to everybody.

I have a question.. for color film, how expired is expired? I mean.. I have provia 100f , 8 rolls from 2009 which I bought to a guy who has been keeping in the freeze..
They'll probably be fine. The film I used in the above photos was expired Astia from 2010. I'm using all my expired Astia first before the few packs I have that are still "in date". I've yet to have a problem using expired film. As mentioned, test shooting a roll first is fairly cheap insurance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goodtimes View Post
I still have bricks of virgin KC64 in the deep freezer. Is there any more possible method to develop them ?
From what I've read, you can still get them developed, but they'll be B&W slides only...
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Old 05-20-2013   #36
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They'll probably be fine. The film I used in the above photos was expired Astia from 2010. I'm using all my expired Astia first before the few packs I have that are still "in date". I've yet to have a problem using expired film. As mentioned, test shooting a roll first is fairly cheap insurance.



From what I've read, you can still get them developed, but they'll be B&W slides only...
If you keep your Astia, expired or otherwise, in the freezer (as Fuji themselves recommend), it will last for a very long time beyond its expiration.
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Old 05-20-2013   #37
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Quote:
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If you keep your Astia, expired or otherwise, in the freezer (as Fuji themselves recommend), it will last for a very long time beyond its expiration.
Regards,
Brett
Indeed they do, it's all in the freezer. Which must be made for film, it's got a great little top rack that seems to fit only small containers or film packs, perfectly.
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Old 05-21-2013   #38
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On a long trip especially on a hot climates you must consider "longetivity" of the films, especially after you've shot them.

I've traveled for years on a motorcycle and often 120 roll films with me staying unexposed or exposed for many months at the time, from ferocious heat to freezing cold, wet humid, dusty & sandy.

I wasn't so impressed with C41 films, but Kodak Portra series seem to do fine, Pro 160C also came out very good after many months of abuse.

Kodak E6 films weren't so impressive - I've gotten them back with color casts and shifts after development. I've found Velvia 50 ranks among the most "resistant" color films, almost never had a problem. The new Velvia 100 is acceptible as well. Provia 400X does fairly good while Provia 100F is more prone for "heat-treatment" (maybe because it's an older emulsion?) - loss of contrast and cast.

In any case, other than the mechanical damages, I've found the most critical is the quick temperature changes and condensation that abuses the film. You must really take care not to let them change temperature quickly, i.e. going quickly from desert up to high mountains or vice versa, throwing them into freezer every day in-out in tropical climates etc - don't do it or avoid as much as you can.

When taken care of color film is quite capable doing long journeys on harsh climates.
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Old 05-22-2013   #39
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Just another data point, but I just ordered a bunch of Portra 160 for my summer trip to the Adriatic. Seemed the most flexible option.
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