Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Classic Film RangeFinders & Other Classics > SLRs - the unRF

SLRs - the unRF For those of you who must talk about SLRs, if only to confirm they are not RF.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Moving from RF to SLR first impressions
Old 09-06-2017   #1
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Moving from RF to SLR first impressions

Hello all
After being a RF user (Leica m3/2) for many years, I recently decided to try using an SLR (Nikkormat) for more accurate framing, longer lenses etc.
My first contact sheets show quite obviously that my hand held technique needs more consideration with an Slr. Many of the frames exhibit a distinct lack of sharpness in comparison to my usual results with an M. This includes higher shutter speeds.
Is this just a question of practice? I generally feel I am pretty confident at holding a camera steady at least an Rf.
Any tips or advice much appreciated.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #2
jamin-b
Registered User
 
jamin-b is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 346
My anecdotal impressions are that the difference if felt particularly with longer lens lengths, and the cause of blurring is hand motion rather than "mirror slap" (since a shot taken with the camera immobilized generally not have the same blur).

I assume you are aware of the rule of thumb that the shutter speed should be the inverse of the lens length, i.e. for a 90mm lens the slowest shutter speed "should" be 1/90). I can't say I particularly honor the rule in practice...
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #3
RichC
Registered User
 
RichC is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Brighton, UK
Posts: 1,113
You don't say whether the lack of sharpness is blur from misfocus or camera shake. If the latter, I suspect it's simply a need to get used to the new camera with its different weight, shape and ergonomics - especially as you've used another camera for a long time. The problem might possibly be down to the heavier weight of the Nikon making it more difficult to hold steady, so perhaps change how you grasp the camera.

If the blur is due to misfocus, and the viewfinder shows perfect focus, then your Nikon may need a service - it's not unheard of for SLR mirrors to become out of whack with the film plane. It should be a straightforward fix for a camera tech.

Sticking the camera on tripod and taking test shots with a cable release will show you where the problem lies...
__________________

-=Rich=-


Portfolio: www.richcutler.co.uk
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #4
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichC View Post
You don't say whether the lack of sharpness is blur from misfocus or camera shake. If the latter, I suspect it's simply a need to get used to the new camera with its different weight, shape and ergonomics - especially as you've used another camera for a long time. The problem might possibly be down to the heavier weight of the Nikon making it more difficult to hold steady, so perhaps change how you grasp the camera.

If the blur is due to misfocus, and the viewfinder shows perfect focus, then your Nikon may need a service - it's not unheard of for SLR mirrors to become out of whack with the film plane. It should be a straightforward fix for a camera tech.

Sticking the camera on tripod and taking test shots with a cable release will show you where the problem lies...
I don't think this is a case of mis focus as some shots were taken at f8/11 so any misalignment of the mirror would I presume, be negligible. It may be a question of ergonomics and getting used to holding a heavier camera. I should have mentioned the lenses used were no longer than 50.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #5
RichC
Registered User
 
RichC is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Brighton, UK
Posts: 1,113
In that case, look to how you hold the camera. With its extra weight, size and mirror "slap", the way you hold it may need improving, despite not having problems with a rangefinder. I personally brace the upper part of one arm flat against my chest with the camera mashed hard into my face! Not necessarily the best way for everyone, but I find that's the best way or me to keep the camera steady.

There's no fundamental difference between using a rangefinder and an SLR though - just that the former is easier to hold steady.
__________________

-=Rich=-


Portfolio: www.richcutler.co.uk
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #6
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
I'm also wondering whether the effectiveness of the old but usable mirror foam may also play a part too.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #7
chrism
Registered User
 
chrism is offline
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 597
Not knowing which lenses you used on the Leicas and the Nikkormat, this might not be a factor, but my experience is that wide open Nikkor lenses will never look like wide open Leica lenses. Not enough to matter if it happens to be a good photo in other ways, but visible all the same.
It's true as well that we get spoiled with small, light Leicas and their lack of vibration. Whatever speed you can handhold with a Leica is going to have to be one or two stops faster with an SLR. Combine that with using longer focal lengths and you have an explanation for quite a lot of blurriness.
The last factor is the act of focusing itself. A rangefinder is easy to focus, even with imperfect vision provided you use contrast rather than alignment for the final touch. Split screens and microprisms do need perfect, or corrected, vision. Of all the SLRs I've used, none have had focusing screens comparable to the microprisms found in the OM series.
Having said all that, the main reason I find myself using an SLR more often than my M2 is the convenience of seeing the DOF 'live', rather than having to imagine it the way I have to with the M2. And since I seem to be addicted to exploiting shallow DOF this is a great help and lets me concentrate on framing and composing.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #8
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
I am generally a 50mm user in both formats and normally shooting around f4-8 which points to my technique more than anything I fear:
I am also thinking the added weight of the Nikkormat could also be playing a part.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #9
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 69
Posts: 4,252
No one asked, what was your shutter speed? Another relevant question, what is your age? As people age, often they have problems with shaking. A good friend can hardly hold his camera steady now compared to 5 years ago. Also have your examined your negs, not the contacts, with a loupe. Contacts aren't very sharp especially if you contact through sleeves or pages.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #10
RichC
Registered User
 
RichC is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Brighton, UK
Posts: 1,113
Anyway, stick it on a tripod and shoot a few (urban?) landscapes. That way you'll definitely know if the blur is your fault or not!
__________________

-=Rich=-


Portfolio: www.richcutler.co.uk
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #11
peterm1
Registered User
 
peterm1's Avatar
 
peterm1 is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,233
I do recall that when I moved from SLR to rangefinder I was surprised (pleasantly) at the ability to shoot quite sharp images at low shutter speeds with my Leica M3. I was quite unable to do that with SLRs. It would therefore not altogether surprise me if you were a rangefinder shooter only, before, to find that going the other way requires you to refine your shooting technique. It might also be that "stabbing" at the shutter button is a culprit which helps account for blurring at higher speeds. The release delay in older SLRs is small but can be a little noticeable and require time to adapt. You say you bought the SLR for longer lenses - your technique will be more critical here as they are more prone to the effects of release technique etc.

One thing you can try is that you can get an original Nikon accessory that screws into the shutter release collar to raise it quite considerably - these help position the finger tip nicely for a more gentle release. If you cannot find the original Nikon accessory an ordinary shutter button from ebay may help too although these are not as tall. I use the original style one on my Nikkor mat and it works a treat. The photo below appears to be similar to the original Nikon version but looks like an after market version. (I forget the Nikon accessory's official designation but I am sure someone here will know it.)

Alternatively pick up a screw in old style shutter release cable, put the camera on a tripod and run a roll through it at various speeds to see if that improves things at all. That at least will clarify if the problem is technique or something else.

EDIT here it is. It is called the AR-1 shutter release.

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2047675.m570.l1313.TR0.T RC0.H0.XNikon+AR-1+sHUTTER+RELEASE+BUTTON.TRS5&_nkw=Nikon+AR-1+sHUTTER+RELEASE+BUTTON&_sacat=0

Save
Save
Save


Save
Save
Save
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #12
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
No one asked, what was your shutter speed? Another relevant question, what is your age? As people age, often they have problems with shaking. A good friend can hardly hold his camera steady now compared to 5 years ago. Also have your examined your negs, not the contacts, with a loupe. Contacts aren't very sharp especially if you contact through sleeves or pages.
Shutter speeds no lower than 1/60. 1/250 on average. Age 42 and in relatively good shape!
The point about viewing the contacts is a very good idea. I hadn't considered that but i've seen various degrees of sharpness/unsharpeness on the contacts when i've bracketed which again points to my technique.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #13
seagrove
Registered User
 
seagrove is offline
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Georgia, USA
Posts: 174
One thing I learned early on in shooting was the position of my elbows. I started out with SLRs and quickly learned that keeping my elbows tight to my body made a tremendous difference in sharpness of images. BUT I would think that this little tidbit also applies to hand-holding a RF. Later on in my news career when I shifted to Nikons, I was able to handhold a 300mm f2.8 lens at 1/60th of a second by bracing myself against just about anything stable. I know this is very basic but, since retiring and shifting from SLRs to Fuji mirrorless (specifically my "poor man's Leica" - an X100s with a TCL-X100), I have had to adjust my technique a little due to the smaller size of the Fuji. Just food for thought....
__________________
Rich
http://www.richard-owen.com
http://meandmyx100s.blogspot.com
Yashica Electro35 GS, Fujifilm X100S, TCL-X100, WCL-X100, sold everything else!
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #14
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by seagrove View Post
One thing I learned early on in shooting was the position of my elbows. I started out with SLRs and quickly learned that keeping my elbows tight to my body made a tremendous difference in sharpness of images. BUT I would think that this little tidbit also applies to hand-holding a RF. Later on in my news career when I shifted to Nikons, I was able to handhold a 300mm f2.8 lens at 1/60th of a second by bracing myself against just about anything stable. I know this is very basic but, since retiring and shifting from SLRs to Fuji mirrorless (specifically my "poor man's Leica" - an X100s with a TCL-X100), I have had to adjust my technique a little due to the smaller size of the Fuji. Just food for thought....
Yes, thats very helpful advice. To be honest, I haven't paid much attention to readjusting my normal posture. I do however think that my elbows are generally braced close to my body but I could be mistaken. I also shoot a lot of verticals which may make a difference in this instance re rf vs slr.
I should add that i'm not a sharpness obsessive but some shots could obviously be sharper than they are.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #15
oftheherd
Registered User
 
oftheherd's Avatar
 
oftheherd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 7,734
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism View Post
Not knowing which lenses you used on the Leicas and the Nikkormat, this might not be a factor, but my experience is that wide open Nikkor lenses will never look like wide open Leica lenses. Not enough to matter if it happens to be a good photo in other ways, but visible all the same.
It's true as well that we get spoiled with small, light Leicas and their lack of vibration. Whatever speed you can handhold with a Leica is going to have to be one or two stops faster with an SLR. Combine that with using longer focal lengths and you have an explanation for quite a lot of blurriness.
The last factor is the act of focusing itself. A rangefinder is easy to focus, even with imperfect vision provided you use contrast rather than alignment for the final touch. Split screens and microprisms do need perfect, or corrected, vision. Of all the SLRs I've used, none have had focusing screens comparable to the microprisms found in the OM series.
Having said all that, the main reason I find myself using an SLR more often than my M2 is the convenience of seeing the DOF 'live', rather than having to imagine it the way I have to with the M2. And since I seem to be addicted to exploiting shallow DOF this is a great help and lets me concentrate on framing and composing.
I'm sorry, I must be missing something. How do you check contrast through a viewfinder that never changes regardless of the lens used (assuming different lines for different focal length lenses) or the focus point? I have used contrast successfully with SLR in low light though.
__________________
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #16
splitimageview
Registered User
 
splitimageview is offline
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,340
My guess is there are several things at play here, but one of them may be the difference in the tactile feel of the Leica shutter button vs the Nikkormat. You might be inadvertently and unknowingly moving the camera when firing it.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #17
oftheherd
Registered User
 
oftheherd's Avatar
 
oftheherd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 7,734
Megido,

Lots of good advice above. One of the last things many forget is that they may be discounting the differences between the Nikon and the Leica shutter release pressures, if there are any. I shot SLR a lot, and when I get the chance to take photos, normally still do. Finding a good position was quick for me as I was used to shooting weapons (was in the US Army at the time). So was holding breath when I could. As some mentioned, bracing oneself is good too. I took a photo inside a dimly lit temple by bracing my head against a wall. At 1/2 second, it was surprisingly sharp.

I guess I would simply say look at all the advice given and start experimenting. Also, see if you photos improve over time simply because you are getting stronger in your stance. That will count for a lot when using longer lenses and vertical format. It's all good, just takes time to adjust.

EDIT: I see splitimageview has already hit on part of the possible problem with depressing the shutter. I think someone else above did the same.
__________________
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #18
splitimageview
Registered User
 
splitimageview is offline
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,340
As far as 'wide open Leica' vs 'Wide open Nikon' - the technical term here is 'balderdash.'


Quote:
Originally Posted by oftheherd View Post
How do you check contrast through a viewfinder that never changes regardless
referring to contrast of the RF patch?
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #19
Rob-F
Not a Leica Collector
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Posts: 5,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by seagrove View Post
One thing I learned early on in shooting was the position of my elbows. I started out with SLRs and quickly learned that keeping my elbows tight to my body made a tremendous difference in sharpness of images.
Yes. Also, stand with your feet a foot or more apart; take a breath, and exhale halfway before firing the shutter; brace elbows against your sides; rest the camera in the heel of the right hand as you squeeze the shutter button gently without jerking. All these things contribute to steadiness.
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #20
Rob-F
Not a Leica Collector
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Posts: 5,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamin-b View Post
I assume you are aware of the rule of thumb that the shutter speed should be the inverse of the lens length, i.e. for a 90mm lens the slowest shutter speed "should" be 1/90). I can't say I particularly honor the rule in practice...
The reciprocal of the focal length should be the minimum speed, not the preferred one. Faster is better. So if it's a 90mm, 1/125 is useful (most cameras don't have a 1/90 speed anyway); and 1/250 is better yet (and so on). Faster film is a good idea when hand holding long lenses, to facilitate shorter exposures.
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #21
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 4,699
Maybe you are moving your body with the SLR because you're holding it differently?

Have someone watch you using both cameras.

At one point, I discovered slight forward body motion at the worst possible time was causing problems. I had to unlearn that habit.

While f 8 and short shutter times should eliminate many possibilities, I too suspect the focus alignment.

The above-mentioned tripod test seems useful. Old mirror foam is also worth checking out.
__________________
To see what is in front of ones nose needs a constant struggle. George Orwell

williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #22
raid
Dad Photographer
 
raid's Avatar
 
raid is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 28,148
I had no such problems with using SLR cameras for speeds 1/30 and up.
__________________
- Raid

________________
Top 12 Images;

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/rffg...n.php?cid=7007

http://raid.smugmug.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #23
charjohncarter
Registered User
 
charjohncarter's Avatar
 
charjohncarter is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Danville, CA, USA
Posts: 7,788
It might be focusing. I find my old Spotmatic is the easiest to focus for me. And I use a Pentax P3n which has a bright finder with split image focus. 50mm lens are fine with these SLRs but give me a RF when you go wider. The P3n is the best SLR for me with a 28mm and 20mm but still the RF gives me more confidence.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #24
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post


While f 8 and short shutter times should eliminate many possibilities, I too suspect the focus alignment.
Do you think the mirror could that much out of alignment to have an effect at f8 and its corresponding depth of field?
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #25
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by oftheherd View Post
Megido,



I guess I would simply say look at all the advice given and start experimenting. Also, see if you photos improve over time simply because you are getting stronger in your stance. That will count for a lot when using longer lenses and vertical format. It's all good, just takes time to adjust.
Thank you very much for the encouraging words!
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #26
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 69
Posts: 4,252
Quote:
Originally Posted by megido View Post
Shutter speeds no lower than 1/60. 1/250 on average. Age 42 and in relatively good shape!
The point about viewing the contacts is a very good idea. I hadn't considered that but i've seen various degrees of sharpness/unsharpeness on the contacts when i've bracketed which again points to my technique.
Bracketing should have nothing to do with sharpness.

First look at the negatives direct with a loupe on a light box.

If you have motion blur with a 50mm at 1/250 of a second you either have a serious issue with your camera like the actual speed is a 1/30 or you're seriously moving like jogging or shooting from a moving car. I'm not trying to be funny, It's not easy to get motion blur at 1/250 with a 50mm lens. You have to work at it to get a blur. At 1/60, yes you can get motion blur.

Go back and look at each neg with a loupe. Motion blur is different than out of focus. You do know that apertures like f11 to 22 you're getting int the helm of diffraction what images are less sharp? On a 50mm like the f1.4 your optimum apertures are around f5.6-8.

Out of focus and diffraction show up as a general softness. Motion blur is a smear and looks different than the other two sharpness killers.

Really without seeing you shoot and looking at negs it's hard to say what you're doing or what's going wrong.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #27
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
I think after all this generous advice the best thing to do is shoot another roll and check the results.
Thank you all for your time and advice. Very much appreciated. Will report back.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #28
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 69
Posts: 4,252
Quote:
Originally Posted by megido View Post
I think after all this generous advice the best thing to do is shoot another roll and check the results.
Thank you all for your time and advice. Very much appreciated. Will report back.
Try half of the roll on a tripod and the other hand held. Examine the negs under a loupe. Don't examine them through any sort of sleeve or page. Just look direct at the negs.

Honestly I can't imagine anyone not being able to hold a camera steady with a 50 at 1/250, except my ex mother in law.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #29
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
Try half of the roll on a tripod and the other hand held. Examine the negs under a loupe. Don't examine them through any sort of sleeve or page. Just look direct at the negs.

Honestly I can't imagine anyone not being able to hold a camera steady with a 50 at 1/250, except my ex mother in law.
Hahaha!
Yes, half tripod half hand held is what i was planning. I think I may be moving/flinching in anticipation of the (flipping) mirror. ;-)l
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #30
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 69
Posts: 4,252
Quote:
Originally Posted by megido View Post
Hahaha!
Yes, half tripod half hand held is what i was planning. I think I may be moving/flinching in anticipation of the (flipping) mirror. ;-)l
Squeeze with the finger. Breath normally. It's not a 44 magnum and won't break your wrist. I am amazed you can blur an image at 1/250.

Like anything else it takes practice. None of us are born with these skills.

Good luck.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #31
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
Squeeze with the finger. Breath normally. It's not a 44 magnum and won't break your wrist. I am amazed you can blur an image at 1/250.

Like anything else it takes practice. None of us are born with these skills.

Good luck.
Not a blur as such, just obviously not as in focus as it could be.
Thank you
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-06-2017   #32
farlymac
PF McFarland
 
farlymac's Avatar
 
farlymac is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 5,399
Look very closely at your negatives. If it is blurring due to camera shake, there will probably be a rotational factor to it, as most times it is caused by stabbing at the shutter release button, rather than squeezing one off like you would with a rifle. Things on one side of the negative will look like they are moving in the upward direction, while on the other side it will be downward. It's not as pronounced in the center.

My biggest problem with any camera is I sometimes rotate my hand while pressing the shutter button, so my horizons are usually out of kilter. Try as I might, I haven't been able to kill that habit yet, especially since it will cause some blurring.

A long shot is the mirror is not returning to it's resting spot, which can cause the focus to be off.

And for a really long shot, make sure there is no diopter lens on the viewfinder, except the one that would normally come with the camera. I think this is referred to as a 0.5 diopter, but is unmarked. A +1 or -1 might not be noticeable enough to your eyes, but could throw things off just enough.

The other thing is lens variability. You could own a half dozen copies of the same lens, but at least one will not be as good as the rest. Best way to check for this is at the focal plane. So open the back, put the camera on B while using a locking release cable to keep the shutter open, take a piece of clear plastic (you can cut one from a broken CD case) with some tape on the side nearest the lens, and place it on the film rails (the inside pair, not the outside ones), then check focus at different distances. Some lenses might perform better close up, while others will be good at infinity. I have a nice little Minolta 28mm that is no good at any distance, so I suspect it had been dropped at some point in time, damaging the internal element mounts.

Of course, it just may take time to get used to the Nikkormat. It is a pretty big camera for a second tier model.

PF
__________________
Waiting for the light

Last edited by farlymac : 09-06-2017 at 11:50. Reason: Spelling
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-07-2017   #33
chrism
Registered User
 
chrism is offline
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitimageview View Post
As far as 'wide open Leica' vs 'Wide open Nikon' - the technical term here is 'balderdash.'




referring to contrast of the RF patch?
You are correct in your second point.
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-13-2017   #34
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Well, I've just seen the results of my recent test roll and I'm happy to say that everything is a lot sharper thanks to all your generous advice. I was able to achieve acceptable sharpness at 1/30 f2. I think the two main problems were the different action of the shutter release button on the Nikkormat (my M3 is extremely sensitive and quiet) plus getting used to not having a continous view at the point of exposure.
Thank you all once again!
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-13-2017   #35
shawn
Registered User
 
shawn is offline
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by megido View Post
plus getting used to not having a continous view at the point of exposure.
I find it much easier to shoot longer exposures when there is no sort of blackout as I brace the camera against myself (elbows in) and then use visual feedback from the finder to try and hold everything steady. Same thing is true with tracking shots.

On the flip side, I have to break the habit of using visual feedback from the finder when shooting an SLR. Basically learn to ignore the finder right as I shoot. Otherwise as the mirror first starts to move (before blackout) the image shifts and I think I unconsciously try and compensate.

Shawn
  Reply With Quote

Old 09-14-2017   #36
megido
Registered User
 
megido is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by shawn View Post
I find it much easier to shoot longer exposures when there is no sort of blackout as I brace the camera against myself (elbows in) and then use visual feedback from the finder to try and hold everything steady. Same thing is true with tracking shots.

On the flip side, I have to break the habit of using visual feedback from the finder when shooting an SLR. Basically learn to ignore the finder right as I shoot. Otherwise as the mirror first starts to move (before blackout) the image shifts and I think I unconsciously try and compensate.

Shawn
I also find that it much easier to see if i moved the camera during exopsure with an continuous view.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 13:30.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.