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A burglary changed my mind
Old 01-28-2018   #1
p.giannakis
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A burglary changed my mind

I have to say, when it come to cameras, i generally split them into two categories, the ones i use and the ones i hold and admire. This is how i ended up with a collection of 20 cameras - Nikons, Canons, Olympuses, Voigltlander and a Leica.

I am a cheap-skate too - with the exception of the Leica (which i got for £300 anyway) i never paid more than £150 for any camera (more likely to be around £50-£80 in car boot sales). So I can't say that I have spent a lot of money for my camera collection - if anything my film negatives are more valuable (to me).

Last night there was a burglary next door - the alarm went on for an hour - i feel sorry for the guy but made me think. I thing i should just sell all of my cameras except from the ones i use regularly and buy film and photographic related chemicals.

Better this way than stolen i suppose...
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Old 01-28-2018   #2
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Hard to believe that burglars are interested in your old fashioned cameras. This kind of people usually think that film is no longer available and that those cameras are worthless.

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Old 01-28-2018   #3
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It's better not to worry about it. Bad things happen all the time but that doesn't mean you have to change your life. If you want to keep your cameras, keep them. If you want to sell them to fund other exploits, then sell them. Selling them to keep them away from thieves makes no sense.
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Old 01-28-2018   #4
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I reckon I'd keep them too. Quite a lot of work selling cameras, especially 15-20 in one hit. And the financial return is not great.

I was very worried when we went away two weeks ago and the house was unattended for eight days for the first time in a long time. I took with me my M9-P and the Hasselblad. My M2, given to me by my father and my first camera, I just put on a higher shelf, and the main shelf with all my cameras I festooned with unfiled rolls of 35mm and 120 negatives, empty films canisters, box-ends etc etc. and I was banking on Erik's view prevailing. I did hide the Monochrom and three lenses in a new bag in a very high cupboard where all the cases, folding chairs, backpacks, sleeping bags etc are kept. In a sense I am hoping my old film cameras are good camouflage for the more expensive digital ones.
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Call me naive, but I don't worry about things like that
Old 01-28-2018   #5
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Call me naive, but I don't worry about things like that

Dear P. Giannakis.

I do have the benefit of living a bit out of the way, but I never locked my vehicles up until 5 years ago when a fly reel and my prized Buck 110 knife that I had from when I was kid were stolen from my truck.

I can tell you this. While I understand the how and why for some who have responded regarding saying that they stash their gear when traveling, I could never do that. I'd forget where I put most of the stuff and wind up re-purchasing replacements.

Regards,

Tim Murphy

Harrisburg, PA
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Old 01-28-2018   #6
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Thieves have to be careful in the Southern US, because most home-owners here have guns - lots of them. The thieves are likely to be after the guns too, since they are quite valuable. Most of these idiots are drug addicts looking for something cheap to pawn off so that they can buy their next hit of drugs.

Worst case I know of happened to a colleague. His wife came home one day, thief followed her into the house. I guess her situational awareness was low. He robbed her, and shot her in the face 9 times, killing her. He got away with $15 in the purse. He never even bothered to ransack the house. When the husband got home, he was wondering why the car in the garage had the driver's door open, and the keys still in it. The garage door to the house was open. His wife was dead in the kitchen.

Killer tried to make a withdrawal at an ATM, and was identified by police using the ATM cameras. There is a death penalty here. I hope they use it on this scum.
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Old 01-28-2018   #7
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Don't worry about older cameras.
When I was burglarized in March, 2013, the thief took my favorite camera bag and two Nikon 2nd generation digital bodies. D2x and D2Hs. They also got a 14mm lens, 17-55mm and a 24mm f/2.8 Ai that I had just rebuilt.

They opened the green Domke bag with a Nikon SP with 3.5cm f/1.8 mounted and Leica M4 with DR Summicron mounted but I guess they thought they were worthless. Just the Leica body was worth more than the whole digital kit EXCEPT for the fact that with that theft, I lost my job. I had just moved there and I didn't have insurance covering my gear for professional work. Not to worry, the bureau of Newsday I was working for closed two months later.

Anyway, I know who the thief was. It was my neighbor. I could never prove it though. Had the Leica M4 been gone, I would have made a rash decision and my neighbor would have been at least scared, if not injured.

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Old 01-28-2018   #8
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No homeowners insurance?
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Old 01-28-2018   #9
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No homeowners insurance?
I'm a poor renter. I had renter's insurance but no renter's insurance policiy will cover photo gear which is used in a professional capacity.

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Old 01-28-2018   #10
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I agree that selling gear on the offchance that it might be stolen doesn't quite make sense.

Most burglaries are done by junkies who want easy money in the form of cash, jewelry, and easily pawnable items. Film cameras look like nothing to the average junkie burglar, touch wood.

If you have more expensive gear, leave it at the bottom of a pile of cheap plastic cameras. I'm only half-kidding here. That's probably the best camouflage.

Having said that, if I'm away for an extended period of time, my more important gear either goes with me, or is put into cases and stashed with family. This includes harddrives containing photos.
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Old 01-28-2018   #11
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Don't worry about older cameras.
When I was burglarized in March, 2013, the thief took my favorite camera bag and two Nikon 2nd generation digital bodies. D2x and D2Hs. They also got a 14mm lens, 17-55mm and a 24mm f/2.8 Ai that I had just rebuilt.

Anyway, I know who the thief was. It was my neighbor. I could never prove it though. Had the Leica M4 been gone, I would have made a rash decision and my neighbor would have been at least scared, if not injured.
Sufficient time has now passed. Revenge is a dish best served cold. Especially when it looks like an accident.
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Old 01-28-2018   #12
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Years ago you could get coverage from different "Associations" (groups of like professionals). Can't speak to today, but some folks out here might have coverage for professional stuff. Riders for small collections may not be a big deal, but I have no experience with insurance on that side of the pond.

Odd are they will take what they think they can sell quickly. Jewelry, watches, cell phone, tablets, game consoles, TVs, laptops, desktops, quick cash is the goal, easy carry is what they need. On this side of the pond, guns are another favorite target for threat. Use to be you would see LOTs of NRA stickers on cars. Then the owners put two and two together that the rash of truck gun thefts was caused by knowing who had a gun locked somewhere inside. Don't see hardly any these days.

Do you have the model/serial number and pictures of all in the cloud for easy access?

Will having the cash in the bank bring you as much fun as your collection? If not, enjoy them.

Do you need the cash? If not, enjoy them.

They are things that you have spent time and had fun tracking them down. Things can be replaced. Time, friends, family can't.

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Old 01-28-2018   #13
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Thieves have to be careful in the Southern US, because most home-owners here have guns - lots of them. The thieves are likely to be after the guns too, since they are quite valuable. Most of these idiots are drug addicts looking for something cheap to pawn off so that they can buy their next hit of drugs.

Worst case I know of happened to a colleague. His wife came home one day, thief followed her into the house. I guess her situational awareness was low. He robbed her, and shot her in the face 9 times, killing her. He got away with $15 in the purse. He never even bothered to ransack the house. When the husband got home, he was wondering why the car in the garage had the driver's door open, and the keys still in it. The garage door to the house was open. His wife was dead in the kitchen.

Killer tried to make a withdrawal at an ATM, and was identified by police using the ATM cameras. There is a death penalty here. I hope they use it on this scum.
this was very difficult to read. one of the reasons why I escaped to Japan

life is not perfect here but at least its safer than most places, even Singapore where I spent part of my life in.
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Old 01-28-2018   #14
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Last night there was a burglary next door - the alarm went on for an hour - i feel sorry for the guy but made me think. I thing i should just sell all of my cameras except from the ones i use regularly and buy film and photographic related chemicals.

Better this way than stolen i suppose...
Around here, burglars steal anything they can sell for their next dose of meth... TV's, computers, jewelry, cell phones, cash, stereo components, documents they can use to do identity theft, and especially guns. Old film cameras would be seen as valueless, since they can't really be traded for drugs.

If you're worried about someone rifling through your camera gear, store them in some back closet in unmarked boxes that make them look like you got tired of them and haven't touched them for years. We humans have quite an instinct to beautify the presentation of possessions we love... not just camera collectors, but everyone. As much fun as it is to store cameras in lighted display cases, nothing draws the eye of visitors (wanted or not) than a fancy presentation. We may as well have flashing Las Vegas signs pointing at something that says "take me."

One of the best ways to ward off burglars as to simply have a dog... the bigger the better....

Scott
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Old 01-28-2018   #15
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I can't believe none of you have gun safes, I own two. They range in price from a couple hundred dollars to a few thousand. Chances are you don't need a very large one and the cost would be cheaper than getting an insurance policy.

I have both in closets with one anchored in concrete downstairs and the other anchored in a wooden floor upstairs. They both have dial combination locks that would require someone with safe cracking experience to get in. These things are extremely secure.

You can lock all your valuables in it and important papers with your cameras and lenses. It's smart, secure and inexpensive. Most sporting goods stores carry a variety of sizes as prices.
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Old 01-28-2018   #16
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Yup. We were robbed by a gang of 13 year olds. Can’t live in fear.
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Old 01-28-2018   #17
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All replies point to the obvious - no need to spoil my enjoyment over something that might never happen.

Actually a PC visited us last night and told us that there is a gang of thieves that target high performance cars in the estate. I own a 20y.o. Volkswagen Polo, I can run faster than it. So no need to panic.

But it is interesting how the mindset changes when you perceive you are in danger.
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Old 01-28-2018   #18
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I can't believe none of you have gun safes, I own two. They range in price from a couple hundred dollars to a few thousand. Chances are you don't need a very large one and the cost would be cheaper than getting an insurance policy.

I have both in closets with one anchored in concrete downstairs and the other anchored in a wooden floor upstairs. They both have dial combination locks that would require someone with safe cracking experience to get in. These things are extremely secure.

You can lock all your valuables in it and important papers with your cameras and lenses. It's smart, secure and inexpensive. Most sporting goods stores carry a variety of sizes as prices.
You are right. I have looked a few times. Never seen quite the right thing. And unless it's really locked down in concrete, maybe it's a temptation for the thieves to really have a go to get it out and take it with them, causing a lot of damage. But I will get one and ought to do it soon, for the papers and a few family photos mainly.
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Old 01-28-2018   #19
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don't worry, be happy.
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Old 01-29-2018   #20
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Make sure you have a list of serial numbers. Then if you are burgled, they might turn up in a local camera or second-hand dealer, or these days, on eBay. If they are daft enough to have accepted a cheque in payment, the police can go round and charge them with at least a minimum of handling stolen goods. I speak from experience.
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Old 01-29-2018   #21
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Don't worry and be happy AND . . .
make sure you have an off-site backup of your photos, in case they do not go for your cameras but take the more easily sold computer hardware . . . .
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Old 01-29-2018   #22
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My homeowner's insurance includes the list of camera gear (under "personal items") that I update every year.
Also have an alarm system.
That aside, a druggie will just kick the side door in, steal some stuff and be gone long before the police get here. Even the alarm installer said that nothing is going to prevent a determined thief.

As said above .... your photos are probably worth much more to you than your cameras, so store copies offsite.
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Old 01-29-2018   #23
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You should be so lucky that they just take your cameras.

Our neighbour here (Barcelona) was broken in to last year while she was away for work. They *emptied* her flat, taking everything from the computer and camera to her clothes and even the cans of coke in the fridge. Nothing prepares you for such loss.

We ourselves had our new home broken in to while away for christmas. The police disturbed them but could not enter because we were not there, and the house was subsequently occupied and the locks changed before I was able to return. After a pointless year of fighting to recover access through the courts, we eventually re-entered after the main door was broken. We spent three days and nights defending the our home while builders bricked everything up. The house was completely destroyed inside - walls broken, the bathroom smashed and every piece of metal stolen - from the water heater to the taps and door knobs. The highlight was at 4am having to fight off one of the occupiers trying to get back in by climbing the wall and brandishing a 12 inch knife - and not being able to call the police because we were afraid that they might determine that we were in our own house illegally. We fought him off with buckets of his own piss (which still sounds as absurd as it was). Two years on and the house is still unusable, needing almost complete reconstruction.

Insurance is completely useless in these cases. And no one here will provide cover at any reasonable price for anything as expensive as a Leica.

And if you think that Barcelona is bad for crime when visiting, that is nothing compared to the reality facing the people living here.
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Old 01-29-2018   #24
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No homeowners insurance?
I had renter's insurance. My dealings with the insurance company was like getting robbed a second time.

Police are not like on TV. Basically indifferent. A big insult. Pretty much I became a P.I. and fed the detective on my case info. Three local crack heads were the perps and were responsible for about 25 break-ins in my neighborhood. These two brothers and cousin had rap sheets.

As further insult one of the guys plea bargained and only got probation and drug rehab.

My policy now is to live in a building at least three stories up without a fire escape with a steel door and deadbolt for security. Pretty much you would need to be a SWAT Team or be Spiderman to break in.

Also this bad experience carry's over into when I walk around. If someone pulls out a weapon: I have the right to use lethal force. Also I carry around the rage from being broken into, the violation, and my response to a robbery might be inappropriate.

Pretty much I learned the law does little to protect a victim, and the insurance companies do everything to resist settling a claim making a victim feel violated yet a second time. Nothing like old fashion street justice.

Cal
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Old 01-29-2018   #25
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@Mark. So sorry to hear that.

I actually apprehended a burglar on the way out of my house with a laptop etc. I have no interest in guns or violence but simply chased him and London bobbies turned up.

He was exceedingly arrogant, but not quite so arrogant when the police managed to find him in the nearby wood where he was hiding.

But the parallel crime story is that he'd been through the justice system and was around nine months into a four year sentence by the time we got the money from the insurers.

Thanks for the wise advice here about gun safes and similar - and backing up. I do have a separate portable HD with the last 10 years of family photos which I keep separately from other hardware. Although the rueful comments about being able to find the damn thing on return from holiday apply to me, too.
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Old 01-29-2018   #26
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A friend on mine got his car broken into, they took a 5x4 field camera body, the exposed film and threw 3 lenses into the bushes down the end of the street.

I have all my serial numbers recorded, home insurance (covers me out of the home up to £2000) and a naive sense of security.
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Old 01-29-2018   #27
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Yes, it was pretty scary.

For amusement here is a photograph of the guy climbing up the wall, and then of the knife he was carrying - abandoned the next night after after a police patrol passed and scared him away.





The guy was an illegal immigrant and clearly high on drugs.

I documented the full year of occupation using a pair of GRs, one of which was destroyed by the criminals while shooting. At the start, they intended to sell drugs from the house (which has a non-shared entrance to the street), but this failed after we kept calling the police and taking flash photographs of them and also the vans that we believe were being used for illegal trading to/from Morroco (these were eventually shut down by the police).

I have several thousand images from the year, but I still do not feel up to collating them for a proper project.

The worst part was the police informally advising us to hire some thugs to beat up the people in our house and kick them out, because the legal system here is so unbelievably broken. I do not want to live in a society in which the only response to violence and criminality is more violence and criminality.

Having lived through the year, and having been attacked several times I strongly recommend not tackling the criminals yourself if there is any other option.
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Old 01-29-2018   #28
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Yes, it was pretty scary.

For amusement here is a photograph of the guy climbing up the wall, and then of the knife he was carrying - abandoned the next night after after a police patrol passed and scared him away.

The guy was an illegal immigrant and clearly high on drugs.

I documented the full year of occupation using a pair of GRs, one of which was destroyed by the criminals while shooting. At the start, they intended to sell drugs from the house (which has a non-shared entrance to the street), but this failed after we kept calling the police and taking flash photographs of them and also the vans that we believe were being used for illegal trading to/from Morroco (these were eventually shut down by the police).

I have several thousand images from the year, but I still do not feel up to collating them for a proper project.

The worst part was the police informally advising us to hire some thugs to beat up the people in our house and kick them out, because the legal system here is so unbelievably broken. I do not want to live in a society in which the only response to violence and criminality is more violence and criminality.

Having lived through the year, and having been attacked several times I strongly recommend not tackling the criminals yourself if there is any other option.
Mark,

This is sad. Barcelona is said to be a beautiful city, and there must be such a sense of history.

There is a great moral debate. I for one think it is alright to fight evil and sometimes violence is appropriate, but I also try to be a kind and giving person. Revenge to me is too premeditated...

Cal
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Old 01-29-2018   #29
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The local police/CID could tell you if you live in a crime hotspot or else it was a one off. Insurance, a dog and a safe are the usual answers; plus that book of serial numbers.


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Old 01-29-2018   #30
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You should be so lucky that they just take your cameras.

Our neighbour here (Barcelona) was broken in to last year while she was away for work. They *emptied* her flat, taking everything from the computer and camera to her clothes and even the cans of coke in the fridge. Nothing prepares you for such loss.

We ourselves had our new home broken in to while away for christmas. The police disturbed them but could not enter because we were not there, and the house was subsequently occupied and the locks changed before I was able to return. After a pointless year of fighting to recover access through the courts, we eventually re-entered after the main door was broken. We spent three days and nights defending the our home while builders bricked everything up. The house was completely destroyed inside - walls broken, the bathroom smashed and every piece of metal stolen - from the water heater to the taps and door knobs. The highlight was at 4am having to fight off one of the occupiers trying to get back in by climbing the wall and brandishing a 12 inch knife - and not being able to call the police because we were afraid that they might determine that we were in our own house illegally. We fought him off with buckets of his own piss (which still sounds as absurd as it was). Two years on and the house is still unusable, needing almost complete reconstruction.

Insurance is completely useless in these cases. And no one here will provide cover at any reasonable price for anything as expensive as a Leica.

And if you think that Barcelona is bad for crime when visiting, that is nothing compared to the reality facing the people living here.
Note to self: Don't visit Barcelona.
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Old 01-29-2018   #31
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You should be so lucky that they just take your cameras.

Our neighbour here (Barcelona) was broken in to last year while she was away for work. They *emptied* her flat, taking everything from the computer and camera to her clothes and even the cans of coke in the fridge. Nothing prepares you for such loss.

We ourselves had our new home broken in to while away for christmas. The police disturbed them but could not enter because we were not there, and the house was subsequently occupied and the locks changed before I was able to return. After a pointless year of fighting to recover access through the courts, we eventually re-entered after the main door was broken. We spent three days and nights defending the our home while builders bricked everything up. The house was completely destroyed inside - walls broken, the bathroom smashed and every piece of metal stolen - from the water heater to the taps and door knobs. The highlight was at 4am having to fight off one of the occupiers trying to get back in by climbing the wall and brandishing a 12 inch knife - and not being able to call the police because we were afraid that they might determine that we were in our own house illegally. We fought him off with buckets of his own piss (which still sounds as absurd as it was). Two years on and the house is still unusable, needing almost complete reconstruction.

Insurance is completely useless in these cases. And no one here will provide cover at any reasonable price for anything as expensive as a Leica.

And if you think that Barcelona is bad for crime when visiting, that is nothing compared to the reality facing the people living here.
This is something simply enfuriating.

Occupation is a huge problem here, basically the law does nothing with it. For a long time nothing. Many do wish Politician's homes should be occupied as to have something done.
I think you may have the edge the first hours by claiming they are trespassing and stealing, but once they squat in... Lengthly and painful process. You actually did the most effective thing.

At least, by law, being able to call the police and have them effectively kicking them out of the place would be effective enough.

Many people live "freely" this way. Some with some fair reason, others without. A fault of the system was the huge evictions that happened during the crisis, there was a lack of nonrecourse debt option, which is just a worse prospect for those affected.
The craziest example are criminal organizations breaking in and taking over flats and then subletting this!

In which district are you living? Gothic quarter has a huge problem with the "narcopisos" AFAIK. Organized crime breaking in and using the flats as drug trafficking bases.
Eixample seems to be less affected by this, as the suburbs and outer towns.
I live further down the coast, where there's a huge stock of summer apartments and I've been told that Okupas are quite common, they come from the cities and just take over places here. My town has 25K registered residents but becomes 150K at summer...

Also, housing prices seem to be trending towards bubble status again but the economy is in shambles (to the locals). Basically there is a misadjustment between prices and salaries.
1000€ at least for any housing in Barcelona... That's the normal wage here.
The above issue of ocupation is a factor for rental prices being high too. Many histories of people not paying rent, and also, ransacking and destroying the propiety when they leave.

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Originally Posted by Calzone View Post
Mark,

This is sad. Barcelona is said to be a beautiful city, and there must be such a sense of history.

There is a great moral debate. I for one think it is alright to fight evil and sometimes violence is appropriate, but I also try to be a kind and giving person. Revenge to me is too premeditated...

Cal
IMO. It's a great place to live and visit, just not for work (given the post-recession conditions) and there's a bit of circus around Politics, like the incompetence in regulating this issue. And of course, the issues of any city.
There's the option of living in the nice towns out of BCN (Sitges, San Cugat come to my mind), where many elites are located.
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Old 01-29-2018   #32
oftheherd
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Yes, it was pretty scary.

For amusement here is a photograph of the guy climbing up the wall, and then of the knife he was carrying - abandoned the next night after after a police patrol passed and scared him away.





The guy was an illegal immigrant and clearly high on drugs.

I documented the full year of occupation using a pair of GRs, one of which was destroyed by the criminals while shooting. At the start, they intended to sell drugs from the house (which has a non-shared entrance to the street), but this failed after we kept calling the police and taking flash photographs of them and also the vans that we believe were being used for illegal trading to/from Morroco (these were eventually shut down by the police).

I have several thousand images from the year, but I still do not feel up to collating them for a proper project.

The worst part was the police informally advising us to hire some thugs to beat up the people in our house and kick them out, because the legal system here is so unbelievably broken. I do not want to live in a society in which the only response to violence and criminality is more violence and criminality.

Having lived through the year, and having been attacked several times I strongly recommend not tackling the criminals yourself if there is any other option.


That whole situation just baffles me. I cannot imagine such a thing happening. Especially the reaction of the authorities to all that happened.

Did the police volunteer to be the thugs?

While I understand reluctance to resort to violence, personally, I would be very inclined at some point to test the waters and see who could be most violent. Especially if I caught the person climbing up to my window. If he does that enough he has to expect he might lose his grip at some point and fall.

But in general, however much I might wish to do things like that, I would know that I would have to be unbelievably cruel to have a chance of chasing them away and not having to worry about retaliation against my family. People like that only worry about satisfying their own desires, and don't really care how much they hurt anyone else. Some actually delight in exercising power over other people.

I really sympathize with you. What a terrible thing to have to go through.
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Old 01-30-2018   #33
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Don't let stories like this put you off Barcelona. It's a wonderful, and very safe place to visit. I'd go back for the Gaudi architecture alone. Hell, I'd go back for the amazing vegetarian food and craft beer!

Barcelona is just as safe as London, and a lot safer than most large American cities:

https://safearound.com/danger-rankings/cities/
I think you're right to say one should still visit Barcelona, but it would be naive to say there are fewer criminals preying on tourists in Barcelona than in London.

I love the city to bits; but the number of people attempting well-known scams (fake vomit etc where they 'clean' your coat, distraction techniques etc etc etc) in Barcelona is significant compared to London or Paris (which aren't perfect of course).

And I agree of course Barcelona is far safer than places like the West Side of Chicago etc, but of course not too many people are walking around the street gazing up at beautiful Modernista buildings in the West Side.
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Old 01-30-2018   #34
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This is something simply enfuriating.
In which district are you living? Gothic quarter has a huge problem with the "narcopisos" AFAIK. Organized crime breaking in and using the flats as drug trafficking bases.
All of the problems occurred in Clot, near Glories. The area is suffering from a combination of poverty, illegal immigration (mainly from North Africa) and a complete failure of governance. This is resulting in huge illegal markets with hundreds of people selling everything from junk to stolen items, and the development of several growing shanty towns around the highly misnamed Glories square.

The irony is that we were trying to move to Clot to get away from the Raval, where we currently live (a few minutes walk from Las Ramblas). The narco pisos were in the street next to us, where the flats had been illegally occupied and used for drug dealing. In the end it took months of nightly mass protests from local residents before the city council would allow the police to act. We have had bloody syringes inside our stairwell, after people managed to get in during the night to shoot up. Syringes are a regular fixture in the streets around here, and it is almost impossible to walk down the lower part of Las Ramblas at night without being solicited by the prostitutes and drug sellers. All of this then fuels the problems of general crime in the city.

Several of the flats in our building have been broken in to and robbed in the last few years, and we now have a video surveillance system running 24/7. As others have suggested, we also keep off-site backups of everything important.

The problems of drugs, drunken tourists, prostitution and theft have exploded in Barcelona over the last three years - at least in part because the politicians only seem to care about largely meaningless idealogical battles rather than building a safe, sustainable and prosperous city environment. That said, most tourists visits here are safe so long as you avoid the worst parts of the Raval late at night, and are careful to take precautions against pick-pockets and bag snatchers on Las Ramblas and the metro system.
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Old 01-31-2018   #35
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I can't believe none of you have gun safes, I own two. They range in price from a couple hundred dollars to a few thousand. Chances are you don't need a very large one and the cost would be cheaper than getting an insurance policy.

I have both in closets with one anchored in concrete downstairs and the other anchored in a wooden floor upstairs. They both have dial combination locks that would require someone with safe cracking experience to get in. These things are extremely secure.

You can lock all your valuables in it and important papers with your cameras and lenses. It's smart, secure and inexpensive. Most sporting goods stores carry a variety of sizes as prices.
The thread focuses on cameras, not guns, but your point is a good one. I have two gun safes too, but I store guns in them, not cameras. However, in jurisdictions that ban guns, storing cameras in large gun safes would work very well. I have only one camera worth enough to inspire me to store it in the gun safe... I donít have room right now but I could sell off a few pistols to make room easily enough.

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Old 01-31-2018   #36
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Originally Posted by :: Mark View Post

The problems of drugs, drunken tourists, prostitution and theft have exploded in Barcelona over the last three years - at least in part because the politicians only seem to care about largely meaningless idealogical battles rather than building a safe, sustainable and prosperous city environment. That said, most tourists visits here are safe so long as you avoid the worst parts of the Raval late at night, and are careful to take precautions against pick-pockets and bag snatchers on Las Ramblas and the metro system.
This.

As I'm not commuting daily to BCN nowadays after having graduated (UPF), I'm not having much news about more local issues. I do recall the problems with illegal markets around GlÚries, and Narcopisos specially because of it being broadcasted around.
Raval itself, I've been told (and seen) that above C/Hospital is better than its below (historical Barrio Chino) side.

I'm not sure, but the inner-mountain districts as well as eixample don't seem to have as many widely reported squatting issues.

Last month I went around with some friends, who ironically live in the farther area of St. Andreu and don't frequent the center. Locals don't go downtown much I guess! We were surprised at the sheer amount of shady guys offering "coffee shop" in the Ramblas. Didn't see that even just a few months ago.
Saddened by the political circus and sheer neglect on this issues.

As visitors, Barcelona is a great place and just have to take the common precautions. The issues here are mostly important if you settle somewhere.
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Old 01-31-2018   #37
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Leave some trinkets out where they can be seen easily. Hide or lock up the rest. Generally burglars spend less than 10 minutes in a home.

My inlays used to leave a few hundred dollars on the dresser in the bedroom when they went on vacation. Please take it and leave was what they wanted.

Last advice, do not hide valuables in the master bedroom. That be the first place they go. Hall clothes closet second.
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Old 01-31-2018   #38
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Hard to believe that burglars are interested in your old fashioned cameras. This kind of people usually think that film is no longer available and that those cameras are worthless.

Erik.
I've usually found very little in the way of thinking involved in someone who'd do something like this. Its typically more of a "Grab it and figure it out later" mentality. But I agree, don't let the actions of a handful of jerks ruin your enjoyment of the vintage cameras in your collection.
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Old 01-31-2018   #39
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The burglars visited me in the form of a workers who was left alone doing some electrical work. Out of about 40 cameras and 100s of lenses, he only took the Optio Point and shoot. Same thing happened in L.A., when they broke into my car couple of years ago, and out of 30 CDs, they stole only one. That tells me I am getting old or the music I like is not good enough, they were mostly classical guitar pieces by Segovia.
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