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Old 05-23-2017   #41
Beemermark
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Get a crown Graphic and you won't go wrong to start with. Another good inexpensive camera is the Tachahari, I recently sold mine after 25 years and used it better than my far more expensive Toyo 45AX. Also, monorails are dirt cheap, super light and as long as you don't start trying gymnastics with them will do you fine. Go over to Largeformatforum.com and look around. You only need one lens to start. Learn the process before getting wrapped up in tilts & swings, lenses and expensive cameras.
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Old 05-23-2017   #42
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monorails are dirt cheap, super light
LOL what?

My first 4x5 camera was a Toyo 45GII - official specs say over 12 pounds for just camera.

My favorite hiking camera is a Chamonix 45n1 - weight clocks in at about 3 pounds.

There's of course many other kinda of monorails and/or field cams but as a rule monorails are pretty much always heavier. That was the point of a "studio camera." A bog-standard Calumet CC400 is almost 10 pounds. Paired with the appropriate tripod you are looking at 20 pounds before even adding the auxiliary stuff. My 4x5 bag with Chamonix and a few lenses plus a CF tripod is only about 10 pounds itself.

I lugged around my Toyo on a trip exactly ONCE, and then I went home and bought a Crown Graphic. The Toyo is still great for architecture and extreme movements as I have a bag bellows and all that, but definitely not a good choice for lugging around.
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Old 05-23-2017   #43
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When I started out with LF I had no idea what I wanted or needed until I got a kit and shot for a few months. After that I knew exactly what camera with what specs and which lenses and what coverage, etc. This is all based on what I shoot and how I shoot. I think LF is something you'll need to dive in. Not sure if this helps but I wish someone had told me this before I bought my first kit which turned out to be inappropriate for my needs.
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Old 05-24-2017   #44
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I have a Speed Graphic but also have an Intrepid on order. I have already got a 90mm Super-Angulon f8 as a starting lens. It's equivalent to a 28mm.

If I were you I'd go for the Intrepid above all others.

I got into 5x4 via the Harman Titan pinhole which is capable of lovely results.

Also get a MOD54 film holder for processing the film and a Paterson 3 reel tank if you don't have one already.
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Old 05-24-2017   #45
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Originally Posted by jusxusfanatic View Post
Thanks, will get the intrepid then after someone refund me. And yea I will need to get a mod54 or another kit
I didn't like the mod54, but YMMW. Have you looked at the SP-445? Eventually for 5x7 I went with the BW KING tank, they have a 4x5 model as well, but it's pricey.

I have a FLM FT38 head that I outgrew, if you're looking for a good tripod head. Works well on 4x5 and small 5x7, but for the heavier 5x7 I found that I needed the larger ball.

A good thing with the FLM ballheads is that you can set it in one direction at a time - almost like a 3D head!
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Old 05-24-2017   #46
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Originally Posted by jusxusfanatic View Post
Which 4x5? (Beginner)

I’m wanting to get into 4x5 lately, and was wondering which body I should get? Why does no one suggest getting a speed graphic in existing forums as they’re cheap? I want to get a Charmonix 4x5 F1 but I need to save up. Any more suggestions? Thanks

I just had a look at some cheaper options, here’s the list

Intrepid Gen II 4x5
90mm f8 Nikkor SW
90mm f/8 Fujinon SW
150mm f/5.6 Nikkor-W
I'd recommend getting on the Facebook Large Format Buy / Sell Group.

There's a dude there, Kumar, living in Japan. He gets access to a lot of Toyo stuff, ships fast and cheap, and the prices are very good.

Something like a Toyo45A is the right place to start. It's a tank and can take a beating. It's a beefier Graflex and has more movements.

As for Chamonix, they're ok... but they're fiddly cameras with no detents so getting that sucker square (if that's your cup of tea) is hard.

Personally, I have an Arca Swiss. That's your next GAS upgrade.
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Old 05-24-2017   #47
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Someone offered me a Tachihara 4x5 at a decent price. I know it's popular to LF shooters, but I don't really like the look of it. Any opinions?

Of course, you will get lots of attention while set up in the street! That's with the cherry and golden brass finish. Anyways, think that a bellows camera is quite a novelty to see, and a great ice breaker. Bellows and TLR cameras have this allure.

I suppose you will go for slower tripod setups, handheld relegates you basically to press cameras, as commented before.

You are the one that will be shooting it and has a rough idea of the usage. Landscapes will not care about the look of the camera.

All if these cameras are capable of excellent results.

Tastes differ and opinions are singular...
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Old 05-24-2017   #48
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Someone offered me a Tachihara 4x5 at a decent price. I know it's popular to LF shooters, but I don't really like the look of it. Any opinions?
If it's the Tachihara 4x5 I'm thinking of:



And you say you don't like how it looks, then I think we have very different opinions of what looks good.

If you're saying this particular one doesn't look good, well, I'd like to know why.

I started shooting 4x5 on a Monorail camera. That opened my eyes to how movements work and how best to apply them. Great learning experience! I gave it away, and recently re-acquired a monorail camera and am going to have fun using that for the things a monorail is good at.

I'll echo above statements: TRIPOD is just as important as the camera.

I moved from the first Monorail to a Super Graphic. The super was a *great* platform for both hand-held shooting with the RF, and use as a field camera with its generous front movements. No FP shutter, but built like a tank. You could crack walnuts with it and not worry.

I did eventually get fed up with the Super Graphic's limited movements for my 75mm lens, and the death of the 4x5-format instant from Fuji made it much less appealing to shoot handheld, so I moved to a Toko 4x5 wood field camera, not dissimilar to the Tachihara but for only about $400 USD used.



I am extremely pleased with it.
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Old 05-24-2017   #49
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Originally Posted by jusxusfanatic View Post
True! But I guess the look doesn't matter to me. Gonna buy the intrepid then, light weight and sturdy, looks good too!

Isn't the intrepid a kit camera? I had a better perception about the tachihara. LOL Don't say look matters, and later on say it doesn't 😂😂😂
Btw, the tachi is quite light and a certain blogger (Mr. R) praised it very much



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Old 05-24-2017   #50
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I' m doing my first steps in lf and made myself a pinhole with some alu sheet I have around. It is forseen to put a fuji swd 75 on it but still a bit work before that bappens. If this goes well I have set my target on a Wista. For developing I got a mod45 but I really don't like the lid and amount of chemicals needed. So I got a jobo 2509n that fits my cpe2 and couldn't be happier.

After reading this thread I agree that building a pinhole for 4x5 is not only fun but also worth it. It let you get some feeling with the work needed when using 4x5 without spending much.
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Old 05-24-2017   #51
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Wow! You think the Intrepid looks nicer than that Tachihara?? I guess we all have opinions... I have a Wista that looks very similar to the Tachi, in my opinion, the cherry wood/brass combo is the quintessential wooden 4x5 field camera.

I'd jump all over the Tachihara if you could get it for a good deal.
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Old 05-24-2017   #52
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I' m doing my first steps in lf and made myself a pinhole with some alu sheet I have around. It is forseen to put a fuji swd 75 on it but still a bit work before that bappens. If this goes well I have set my target on a Wista. For developing I got a mod45 but I really don't like the lid and amount of chemicals needed. So I got a jobo 2509n that fits my cpe2 and couldn't be happier.

After reading this thread I agree that building a pinhole for 4x5 is not only fun but also worth it. It let you get some feeling with the work needed when using 4x5 without spending much.
I'm currently waiting on the Intrepid camera I bought and I happen to have plenty of black-core foam board around...think I know what I'll be doing later today and tomorrow morning!

While I was deciding if I wanted to pursue 4x5, one of the major things that led me to a "yes, I will" answer was the Stearman SP 445 daylight tank. It uses relatively minimal amounts of chemistry, about 500ml for 4 sheets of 4x5. Intended for BW processing. Not too expensive at around $80.
Rob
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Old 05-24-2017   #53
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Originally Posted by gnuyork View Post
Wow! You think the Intrepid looks nicer than that Tachihara?? I guess we all have opinions... I have a Wista that looks very similar to the Tachi, in my opinion, the cherry wood/brass combo is the quintessential wooden 4x5 field camera.

I'd jump all over the Tachihara if you could get it for a good deal.
I chose the Intrepid not for looks--cherry wood and brass is, generally, very pretty to me--but for two other reasons: cost and weight. When I paid for mine it was 250. As I was buying from the US, my cost was less--subtract the 20% VAT and the $ was pretty strong against the . So including a pinhole lens board and shipping my cost was 246. Just over $300 at the time.
Not as pretty as the Tachihara but for my first--other than paper neg. pinbholes I've made over the years--foray into LF, it made sense.
And, the camera is only 900 grams. And new.
I couldn't resist.

Rob
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Old 05-24-2017   #54
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If I recall I got my Wista in 2004ish for $400 used on Ebay...I'm not sure if that's in line with today's pricing... or even if they are readily available used. I do know that was right around when people were leaving film for digital. The guy I bought it from was switching fully to Digital with the Canon 1Ds full frame.

I already had the 1DMKII at the time (which is now a paperweight- a heavy one), but I wanted to try 4x5. Glad I did. In fact I don't shoot this enough. Need to change that.
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Old 05-24-2017   #55
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While I was deciding if I wanted to pursue 4x5, one of the major things that led me to a "yes, I will" answer was the Stearman SP 445 daylight tank. It uses relatively minimal amounts of chemistry, about 500ml for 4 sheets of 4x5. Intended for BW processing. Not too expensive at around $80.
Rob
Got the jobo because I already had the cpe2 but I certainly like that it only needs 270 ml for 6 4x5's when using rotation. Also reasonably easy to find second hand and easy to load.
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Old 05-24-2017   #56
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The Intrepid is certainly not a bad looking camera, but there is something classic about brass and wood that I love. "Corny" maybe, but we all like what we like!

As far as developing, I have a Paterson Orbital Color Print Processor tray thingy, and it's perfect for my needs.
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Old 05-24-2017   #57
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Ha! I guess I need to get more into 4x5 till i understand how good looking those things are

The mod45 is definitely not on my list. Gonna have a look at the jobo
Seeing them in person and using them may be different from just pictures. But don't let us push you into thinking you need to "like" something. After all, the looks of the camera don't matter so much as the pictures that come out of it.
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Old 05-24-2017   #58
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Someone offered me a Tachihara 4x5 at a decent price. I know it's popular to LF shooters, but I don't really like the look of it. Any opinions?
I had a Nagaoka GB back in the day. It was very very similar to the Tachihara. I found that it was an excellent fit for my shooting, which was primarily "rocks & trees" landscapes. It handled my 180 Nikkor-W fine, but it would have had stability problems with a larger 210 or 240, particularly for close work where its bellows would be extended to near its max (~300mm).

I also would have preferred a slide-lock (e.g. "Graflok") back instead of a spring back, but its springs would swallow a Polaroid 405 pack back and my Calumet 6x7 roll holder fine. Backs like the Calumet roll holder and the Polaroid 545 holder, with their heavy mass outside of the back, can be issues with older spring back only cameras was their springs weaken with age and the holders can shift, fogging the film. When using a camera with a combo spring&slidelock back (classic Graflok design), I would alway use the slide locks even when I was sliding the hold in under the ground glass' springs to avoid the isssue.

It should also be noted that one downside to the old Graphic press cameras is their small lens board and the resulting small front opening. They can't "swallow" may modern SW lenses, 90mm and shorter. If you have a Graflok model, you can remove the rear cell, mount the lens, remove the ground glass, and reinstall the rear cell from the back. You still have limitations with the movements as the rear cell will hit the bellows with any significant front movement.
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Old 05-24-2017   #59
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A Wista 45n is a lot more camera than an Intrepid.
That Tachihara is an outstanding shooter and one of the lightest. Much like my Nagaoka.
Just remember, if you want to shoot any street images, you won't be able to do that without a rangefinder. You can't do it with the ground glass, looking at an upside down image under a dark cloth. In fact, I would never do this on the streets of Philadelphia or NYC and I have a lot of experience, combat included. Wearing a dark cloth is just a great way to get run over in a crowd.

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Old 05-24-2017   #60
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Someone offered my a wista 45n, is it any good comparing to the one I want which is the intrepid
The Wista is probably better.
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Old 05-24-2017   #61
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Ive followed your posts for a while and I'd suggest buying the cheapest camera body that's light tight and lens that the shutter works on and covers the format with a little movement that you can find. You've never used a view camera, haven't gotten film processing down very well, don't understand metering and bounce from camera to camera every few weeks.

Forget about what looks cool and get a beater to try. You don't even know if you'll like doing large format. You may not want a monorail but they're super cheap and you can learn with it. Get something like a Calumet monorail from the 60's I used them at the studio I apprenticed in in the early 70's and then when I was an industrial photographer for Union Carbide Nuclear in the mid 70's. They're ugly, heavy, tougher than a tank, easy to use and very cheap. Get an ilex 6" or 8" or similar Tessa's design and learn to use the camera. I'll refer you to Ansel Adams book on the camera, also Exposure and the Negative for processing. You can really learn a great deal from these books.

When you decide if you want to continue with large format, after a few months and exposing a few hundred sheets and getting good results, you can sell your rig and buy something better. You can't really make a judgment on what you need until you learn a little more about yourself and whether LF still has the charm you think it does. There are a lot of LF gear for sale because folks found it wasn't what they thought it was.
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Old 05-24-2017   #62
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There's a Calumet 4x5 monorail on eBay right for $230. Included with that is the case, film holders, darkcloth and a superb Caltar S 210mm. The Caltar S is a rebranded Schneider Symmar S with the Calumet name in it. The Symmar S is one of the best and worth the price of the entire kit. I've used several different FL Symmar S lenses in commercial work since they were introduced. If you buy that and learn to use a view camera, sell the body and keep the rest it like buying the lens at a reasonable le price and getting the rest free. You'll make money and have a lens for a wood field camera.
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Old 05-24-2017   #63
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Well then the Wista 45n would be the cheapest. I agree with what you say. Well I'm not gonna do a few hundred shots in a few moths, wayy less than that I suppose
The Wista is a great camera. Before taking that plunge, research it to get to know all the parts and its intricacies. Make sure to bring a very bright flashlight to check the bellows for leaks (that goes for any large format camera.) Run the camera through the full range of what it can do and make sure it is smooth doing it all.
Find a good 150mm lens if the camera doesn't come with one. The Fujinons in Seiko or older Copal shutters are great. I think you need offset lensboards for the Wista if I recall correctly. Don't forget all the other stuff you'll need and a stable tripod too.

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Old 05-24-2017   #64
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Monorails are that good! I've been a commercial photographer for nearly fifty years. I bought a new Sinar Norma in the late 60's and shot many thousands of sheets through it on jobs. It's just as tight and sturdy today as the day I bought it. The Sinar is top of the line as Linhof and Arca are but even the cheap calumet will last under heavy use for decades. Yes they are that good.

Calumet also had a more versatile model with interchangeable bellows and rails. I believe they were Cambo made. I bought one for a photo department in an ad agency I worked for back in the late 70's. They're great cameras.

Do consider a cheap one until you decide what you need and don't skimp on film. You need to get a book on technique and get out and shoot film, lots of film. You're not going to get very proficient shooting a 25 sheet box. Think about it, 25 sheets is basically the same as a 24 exposure roll of 35mm. You can't learn much shooting 24 exposures of 35mm can you?
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Old 05-24-2017   #65
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Rodenstock 150 f4.5? Has to be a Tessar formula. If so it won't cover much more than 4x5 with little to no movements. You'll be extremely limited.

Before you jump into something you don't know anything about you need to research the different types of lenses. You're going to wind up with something that's not going to work very well.
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Old 05-24-2017   #66
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The 150 f4.5 is most likely a Rodenstock Ysarex which is a Tessar formula. They're good lenses but as I said above it just covers 4x5 with almost no movements. You need a plasmat design like a Symmar (S), Fujinon W ( there are 3 versions), Nikkor W or Rodenstock Sironar. Some of these were found under different brand names at cheaper prices. Do your research first and avoid a costly mistake.
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Old 05-24-2017   #67
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Oh does it? So you mean I won't be able to use the tilt?
That's correct. You really need a book on view camera technique. Actually I think there's a good book by that name. Learn the basics of a view camera and optics before making a mistake. Learn why you need a lens with a large image circle.

I know you've made up your mind and anything I say makes no difference but I have fifty years of professional commercial photography experience of which much of my work was done with 4x5 to 11x14 view cameras.

I hate to see anyone jump into something that's as involved as this without knowing what they're doing. It'll wind up costing you more money in the long run plus a great deal of frustration because you don't understand the principals behind the movements.

With a 150 Tessar type you'll have almost no tilt with the front. You can tilt the back but it creates distortion. These are the things you need to know and why this is so.
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Old 05-24-2017   #68
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Nikkors are great and i've owned several but again know what you're buying. There are quite a few different Nikkor view lens types. You just can't say, oh Fujinons are good I hear. There are 3 versions of W Fujinon. All have different size image circles and some different coatings and shutters. Fujinon lenses are superb. I own several.
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Old 05-26-2017   #69
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I just bought a great Sinar P 4x5 outfit with pro case for $750

it used to sell for about $7K new

bought it use with the Fuji GFX as a digital back
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Old 05-26-2017   #70
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Stephen,
Thanks for bringing this thread back!

Rob
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Old 06-09-2017   #71
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... You really need a book on view camera technique. Actually I think there's a good book by that name. Learn the basics of a view camera and optics before making a mistake.
x-ray,
You offered me good advice in the thread I started, thank you!, and this is also good.

So, I just looked at Amazon for View Camera Technique. Figured it will be a good addition to my book shelves.

I actually was looking for a Kindle version but that version was more expensive than the hardcover edition, and I like books better so I got the last hardcover copy in stock.

My Intrepid shipped today, finally, and so it is going to be a bit of a race between this book and my new camera.

Rob
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Old 06-09-2017   #72
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x-ray,
You offered me good advice in the thread I started, thank you!, and this is also good.

So, I just looked at Amazon for View Camera Technique. Figured it will be a good addition to my book shelves.

I actually was looking for a Kindle version but that version was more expensive than the hardcover edition, and I like books better so I got the last hardcover copy in stock.

My Intrepid shipped today, finally, and so it is going to be a bit of a race between this book and my new camera.

Rob
I think this is the book I checked out of the library in 1964 to learn how to use a view camera. It's been a long time so I may be wrong about which book it was but it should tell you everything you need to know.
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Old 06-09-2017   #73
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I'm not sure how many people are buying view cameras here, but you may try to get an understanding of Scheimpflug. It's covered in "View Camera Technique". All those moves the standards make allow for some advantages.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheimpflug_principle

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gR4m70xr9mE

Don't sweat the math, if it's something you aren't into, just understand the principle.

X-ray, I commend you for your patience .. way more than I have.
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Old 06-09-2017   #74
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I just bought a great Sinar P 4x5 outfit with pro case for $750

it used to sell for about $7K new

bought it use with the Fuji GFX as a digital back
Stephen, a photographer pal uses a P with a Phase One back. He got a set of Rodenstock digital lenses. They are designed for the 645 digital format. You might have a look. http://www.rodenstock-photo.com/en/p...lenses-digital

They are pretty amazing lenses. I guess you're using Capture One?
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Old 06-09-2017   #75
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When I started out with LF I had no idea what I wanted or needed until I got a kit and shot for a few months. After that I knew exactly what camera with what specs and which lenses and what coverage, etc. This is all based on what I shoot and how I shoot. I think LF is something you'll need to dive in. Not sure if this helps but I wish someone had told me this before I bought my first kit which turned out to be inappropriate for my needs.
My first camera was a calumet. I found from reading that I couldn't use a 90 as the bellows wouldn't compress enough to focus it at infinity. So, I got a short bellows camera that wouldn't properly focus my 210 Zeiss Jena. I built a special lens board for the 210. My next two cameras were Sinars which would accommodate both standard and bag bellows. They also come apart and will pack flat for travel, a big plus for me.

I went through a learning period of about a year. I didn't know anyone who used a view camera at the time and just spent some money making mistakes. I needed the camera for work and until I got a modular camera I had problems. x-ray mentioned he has a Norma. The Sinar Norma is a work of art. A really beautiful camera..

I learned from assisting a photographer who used 8x10 for table top work, all about bellows sag, film sag (mainly a 8x10 problem.. vacuum backs), moisture and film holders, why not to buy a wooden camera, etc . The main problem many experience with wooden cameras is: if the camera has some mildly extreme moves, usually the front standard, they won't hold position over a long period of time. Like, over night. This includes Deardorff . The standard locks slip. Lots of still life photographers complained about this. Often a set was created and photographed over several days. Coming in to work, in the morning, to find you were no longer in focus was common. They are great for portrait and field work. Penn used an 8x10 deardorff and his assistants took care of camera problems. I remember reading about Avedon's assistant buying a 8x10 Sinar and setting it up for a shot as a surprise. Avadon knew a new camera was coming but wasn't ready for it. He had used his wooden camera for years. His assistant was going crazy with the problems. He said it took just a few days to embrace the change. You can see him with the 8x10 in the field making portraits in one or more of his books.

Don't forget to get a good tripod.
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Old 06-10-2017   #76
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My recommendation would be for the Sinar Norma. This is a camera you will never outgrow and they are plentiful and not that expensive.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sinar-Norma-...EAAOSwK6RZMbfV

I have four Normas in my studio, 4x5 to 8x10


DSC05763 by Nokton48, on Flickr

My 8x10 Norma. There are close to a hundred accessories for this camera. I own most of them. I have been a Norma owner and user for nearly forty years.
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Old 06-10-2017   #77
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My recommendation would be for the Sinar Norma. This is a camera you will never outgrow and they are plentiful and not that expensive.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sinar-Norma-...EAAOSwK6RZMbfV

I have four Normas in my studio, 4x5 to 8x10

My 8x10 Norma. There are close to a hundred accessories for this camera. I own most of them. I have been a Norma owner and user for nearly forty years.
Nice rig! You should probably explain the Sinar shutter to these people. As some appear new to this and won't know what it is.
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Old 06-10-2017   #78
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My recommendation would be for the Sinar Norma. This is a camera you will never outgrow and they are plentiful and not that expensive.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sinar-Norma-...EAAOSwK6RZMbfV

I have four Normas in my studio, 4x5 to 8x10

My 8x10 Norma. There are close to a hundred accessories for this camera. I own most of them. I have been a Norma owner and user for nearly forty years.
I'm still using my Norma that I bought new in 1969. It's been the main 4x5 that I used for catalog work until digital came in. I added an 8x10 Deardorff to my system in 1973 and used it Until digital came in. The Deardorff I bought was a well used 1930's V8. I cant even guess how many thousand sheets I shot in both and both cameras functioned like new. I still use my Norma on occasion and finally replaced my Deardorff with a near new one. I now use it for collodion and fun photography. Out are great.
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Old 06-10-2017   #79
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I'm still sing my Norma that I bought new in 1969. It's been the main 4x5 that I used for catalog work until digital came in. I added an 8x10 Deardorff to my system in 1973 and used it Until digital came in. The Deardorff I bought was a well used 1930's. I cat even guess how many thousand sheets I shot in both and both cameras functioned like new. I still use my Norma on occasion and finally replaced my Deardorff with a near new one. I now use it for collodion and fun photography. Out are great.
Hi x-ray, I used a Sinar F field camera. My assistant now has it. It was great. My pal who has 2 8x10 Ps and a couple of 4x5 Ps has my other F. He was a big name food photographer. There were days when both 8x10 s were used on separate sets (two sets of lenses$$). I think he had 5 people in the studio back then. Times have changed. My studio neighbor used a Norma. What a great camera. I did/do most of my stuff with 35mm and now digital gear. Most of the people I knew who used 8x10 had at least 5000 w/s of light in their studios. Many had 10k. That's changed too with digital.
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Old 06-10-2017   #80
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Hi x-ray, I used a Sinar F field camera. My assistant now has it. It was great. My pal who has 2 8x10 Ps and a couple of 4x5 Ps has my other F. He was a big name food photographer. There were days when both 8x10 s were used on separate sets (two sets of lenses$$). I think he had 5 people in the studio back then. Times have changed. My studio neighbor used a Norma. What a great camera. I did/do most of my stuff with 35mm and now digital gear. Most of the people I knew who used 8x10 had at least 5000 w/s of light in their studios. Many had 10k. That's changed too with digital.
I closed my bag studio in 2000. I'd been in it for almost 20 years. I had 6000 sqft and could drive a semi truck in it. I was going to do an annual report shot with an executive and his Jet Ranger helicopter in it but the shot got changed to one of his factory locations.

I think at that time I had in excess of 50,000 ws of Speedotron black line and Norman strobes. I by far preceded the Speedotron. I sold a lot of it but still have a 4800 and 2400 with quite a few heads and 5 For e 10 1,000 Speedotron monolites and 5 Alien Bees for tiny stuff. I'm actually a big fan of hot lights and still use them a lot especially for illustrative product shots.

I foolishly sold a lot of equipment a few years ago as I was wooed by digital. After buying a Technikardan 23 with a Hasselblad digital back and a set of digital lenses I saw my mistake and bought a lot of my old view equipment back.

I have my original Norma and can never sell it. In the past few years I replaced my old beater 8x10 Deardorff and picked up a friends 4x5 Deardorff Special he bought new in 1960 and used it during his 70 years as a commercial photographer. I wanted to own something of his because he'd been such an inspiration to me as a kid. For my 60th birthday my wife gave me a new Ebony SV45TE, the ebony one. It's the finest wooden camera I've ever used.

Relatively speaking premium lenses are really cheap now. Some of the cult lenses like Dagor's aren't and Sironar S but they're not worth the extra money and not really better than 99% of the less expensive lenses.

I'll always keep my view cameras. Even if LF film were to go away I can mix collodion and pour my own plates and have done that in the past.
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