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Canon Leica Screw Mount Film Rangefinders For classic Leica Screw Mount Canon Rangefinders.

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Old 07-23-2008   #41
dmr
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So I'm just very carefully drilling a couple holes in the slanted metal part right next to the lens to allow a spanner or other wrench to grip that part and unscrew it?
Yes, and I would really use the term "dimples" rather than holes. It really did not take that much effort to unscrew it once I got a good grip on it.

There are some more detailed instructions on this out there on the web somewhere. Maybe somebody will chime in with the link.

I swear that the next time I need to take one of those apart, I will photograph the entire process, as others will need to do it.

Lately I've heard of people getting it out with a rubber stopper, by friction fit only.
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Old 07-23-2008   #42
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Okay, so I'm not actually making a whole, just a dent to get a grip with.

I know that all rotary tools are not Dremels, but if I'm going to spend $19 on something like that, I'd rather spend another $10 and get a likely more reliable one from the big name company.

Thank you both for all your help.
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Old 07-23-2008   #43
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Okay, so I'm not actually making a whole, just a dent to get a grip with.
Yes, just enough to allow a lens spanner to get a good grip on it.

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I know that all rotary tools are not Dremels, but if I'm going to spend $19 on something like that, I'd rather spend another $10 and get a likely more reliable one from the big name company.
There is another option, but I don't know exactly what you call it, but you see them in hobby shops. It's kind of a spindle that holds a very small drill bit allowing you to drill small holes, manually, by hand. Somebody reported doing this using one of these things.

I already had the Dremel, for jewelry making and such. It's one of the most handy things there is in the world! Any large hobby shop will have them, along with countless wheels, bits, and whatzits for them.

LOL, whenever I join in the real-time chat on another camera board, one of the guys there gives me a hard time about destroying things with the Dremel.
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Old 07-23-2008   #44
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Originally Posted by RFOBD View Post
Okay, so I'm not actually making a whole, just a dent to get a grip with.

I know that all rotary tools are not Dremels, but if I'm going to spend $19 on something like that, I'd rather spend another $10 and get a likely more reliable one from the big name company.

Thank you both for all your help.
I've got both. A real Dremel has too much torque for some things. use a wire wheel on a Dremel, for example, and both you and everything around you will get pierced by bits of flying needle-sharp wire.
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Old 08-11-2008   #45
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...There is another option, but I don't know exactly what you call it, but you see them in hobby shops. It's kind of a spindle that holds a very small drill bit allowing you to drill small holes, manually, by hand. Somebody reported doing this using one of these things....
DMR, I believe you're referring to a "Pin Vise". For this application, I'd suggest one with a revolving head so you can use a finger to maintain alignment of the central axis while turning the tool and bit. Here is a link to an example.

...and remember, the bit only cuts in one direction, so try to only turn it clockwise (going back and forth may seem a bit easier but will dull the bit faster and lower the quality of the cut).

FallisPhoto - thanks for the heads up on Jon Goodman's (ebay seller interslice) light seals in another thread, just ordered a kit from him.

ATB, eDerek
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Old 12-08-2019   #46
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bumping up this thread simply to add my experience. I bought two GIII both of them as "working condition", both of them with sticky shutter. I tried to contact a professional repair shop, but they discouraged me saying the labor is way higher that the market value of the camera. So I have two "dead cameras" I can sacrifice to the science. In regards to the central group I tried any method but the space is really narrow and none of my lens spanners can go there. So the idea: rather than drill holes, or buy additional tools, I simply decided to create two dents on the ring retaining the lens gently hammering down a flat screw driver. Voila, now I can use my lens spanner.
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