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Availability of 110 Cartridge Film
Old 1 Week Ago   #1
Lobalobo
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Availability of 110 Cartridge Film

Lomography manufactures new 110 cartridge film, including Orca B&W 100 ISO film, or used to. Supplies have dwindled over the last year and it is not impossible to find any Orca or any new film with an ISO of 100. Lomography's own site used to list the Orca, sometimes out of stock, but now not listed at all. And although it promises new Metropolitan ISO 100 - 400 film in 110 Cartridge format, that's still a Kickstarter campaign.

My fear is that 100 ISO film in the 110 Cartridge format is now about to disappear again from the market, and perhaps all 110 Cartridge film. (The significance of 100 ISO, by the way, is for a Pentax Auto 110 camera or other sophisticated 110 cameras that read ISO from cartridge and set exposure accordingly; 200 ISO film, the only speed now available, is too fast the low settings on such a camera and too slow for the high settings.)

Anyone have any other information on this topic? Thanks in advance.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #2
Doug
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobalobo View Post
...The significance of 100 ISO, by the way, is for a Pentax Auto 110 camera or other sophisticated 110 cameras that read ISO from cartridge and set exposure accordingly; 200 ISO film, the only speed now available, is too fast the low settings on such a camera and too slow for the high settings.
Well, one pleasant thought is that color negative films typically perform better with a bit of "overexposure", say 2/3 to 1 stop over. So a ISO 200 color neg film is quite happy at EI 100! And, it certainly should not harm a B&W film either. You gain better detail and tonality in the lower tones, shadows, etc.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #3
Steve M.
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You could always put a filter on the lens. A yellow one will make your 200 film a 100 film. No good for colour of course, but for that use a neutral density filter.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #4
Mackinaw
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Take a look at the FPP store website. They sell several types of 110 film.

https://filmphotographystore.com/col...s/all/110-film

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Old 1 Week Ago   #5
Lobalobo
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Thanks to all for the responses. The filters are an option, but a pain as there are many lenses, each of different sizes. Overexposing is not an option I want to use, because I haven't liked the results doing this (too little contrast). Cutting tabs off the ISO 200 cartridges (if they are set for low) and then slightly underexposing using a backlighting adjustment on my camera should work well, but it's a nuisance cutting the tabs. Reloading empty 110 cartridges could get me the ISO I need, but still a nuisance. So I will use some or all of these options, but was hoping I was wrong about the film being discontinued.

As for FPP. That was my source for 110 film, but it is Sold Out of the 100 ISO from Lomography and now stocks only Fukkatsu 110 film, which, I believe, is long expired. But to be fair, I haven't tried any. I should, and if it works, I could by a bunch and stick it in a freezer (as it will soon run out too and is no longer being manufactured).

Again, thanks to all.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #6
ka7197
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Have a look at Fotoimpex in Berlin (Germany): https://www.fotoimpex.com/films/
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Old 1 Week Ago   #7
Huss
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I don't see low contrast by using Lomo's 200 films in my Rollei A110 that reads them as 100:



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Old 1 Week Ago   #8
burninfilm
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Doesn’t the Pentax 110 have a TTL meter? In that case, a filter over the lens won’t do any good, as the camera’s meter will simply alter the exposure to compensate for the filter, and still over-exposing the 200 speed film.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9
Faintandfuzzy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burninfilm View Post
Doesnít the Pentax 110 have a TTL meter? In that case, a filter over the lens wonít do any good, as the cameraís meter will simply alter the exposure to compensate for the filter, and still over-exposing the 200 speed film.
Overexposure by one stop will only make things better for this film
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Old 1 Week Ago   #10
burninfilm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faintandfuzzy View Post
Overexposure by one stop will only make things better for this film
Iím sure it would. I was just trying to inform that filters arenít an option for exposure compensation on the Pentax Auto 110 due to the TTL meter.

The OP did specifically state they didnít like the results of the overexposed 200 speed film.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #11
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IIRC the Pentax Auto 110 can also set itself for ISO 400.
Notches on the 110 film cartridge determine the setting.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #12
Dan Daniel
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https://bluemooncamera.com/store/pro...m-24-exposures
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Old 6 Days Ago   #13
Murray Kelly
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With the Rolleis I tape a piece of film leader of the right density over the meter aperture. I measure the density with a light meter and try various bits until I find the reading drops by the number of stops I want it to shut down.
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Old 5 Days Ago   #14
Lobalobo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burninfilm View Post
Doesnít the Pentax 110 have a TTL meter? In that case, a filter over the lens wonít do any good, as the cameraís meter will simply alter the exposure to compensate for the filter, and still over-exposing the 200 speed film.
This is of course correct. Not thinking straight in agreeing that the filters were even an option. Thanks.
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Old 5 Days Ago   #15
Lobalobo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisPlatt View Post
IIRC the Pentax Auto 110 can also set itself for ISO 400.
Notches on the 110 film cartridge determine the setting.

Chris
Yes, and I mention this in my original response. But that would lead to slight underexposure, even when using the 1.5 stop EV adjustment-button.
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Old 5 Days Ago   #16
Lobalobo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murray Kelly View Post
With the Rolleis I tape a piece of film leader of the right density over the meter aperture. I measure the density with a light meter and try various bits until I find the reading drops by the number of stops I want it to shut down.
A piece of tape inside the camera body? Interesting, but I'm not that ambitious for this project. Also, convincing the light meter that there is less light than there actually is will lead to relative overexposure, right? The opposite of what I want.
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Old 5 Days Ago   #17
Lobalobo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huss View Post
I don't see low contrast by using Lomo's 200 films in my Rollei A110 that reads them as 100:



Nice images. I'll try again simply overexposing by a stop, the easiest solution, of course.
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Old 5 Days Ago   #18
Lobalobo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Daniel View Post
Thanks, I hadn't tried Blue Moon. And I might buy these, though they are a bit pricey. But that's only a year's supply for me and then I'm back to searching unless Lomo makes more ISO 100 110 film (which they say they will, but we'll see).
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Old 5 Days Ago   #19
Lobalobo
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An update: Lomo customer support wrote me back and said that they will produce more Orca 110 film, this even though the site no longer lists the film at all, not even as out-of-stock. Hope that's right.
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Old 5 Days Ago   #20
Murray Kelly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobalobo View Post
A piece of tape inside the camera body? Interesting, but I'm not that ambitious for this project. Also, convincing the light meter that there is less light than there actually is will lead to relative overexposure, right? The opposite of what I want.
You are correct of course. My particular problem was a camera stuck on 400 ASA. To use slower film I had to fool the meter. In this case the ND can be stuck on the outside for simplicity's sake


Good luck.
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