Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Leicas and other Leica Mount Cameras > Voigtlander Lenses and Images

Voigtlander Lenses and Images Post threads showing images from Cosina Voigtlander Leica mount lenses here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

15mm Heliar, Old Soviet Sub
Old 06-08-2008   #1
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
15mm Heliar, Old Soviet Sub

So, if you take pictures with a Cosina lens inside an old Soviet Sub, should there be some sort of FSU tie in?
I spent 6 years in the US Navy, 5 of that on a fast attack sub. It was interesting to see the other half.

Bessa R3A, 15mm Heliar, Tri-X at 1250 iso in Diafine.
All taken at f5.6 or f8









__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #2
Ronald_H
Don't call me Ron
 
Ronald_H's Avatar
 
Ronald_H is offline
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Helmond, The Netherlands
Age: 48
Posts: 1,731
Great stuff! Where did you find this sub?
__________________
"The only substitute for Tri-X is more Tri-X"

My Flickr

My regular website: www.lookupinwonder.nl
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #3
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
The boat is on permanent exhibit along side the Queen Mary (now a hotel) in Long Beach California.

Leave it to California to exhibit a communist sub instead of an old US boat! ;-)
__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #4
rxmd
May contain traces of nut
 
rxmd's Avatar
 
rxmd is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Kyrgyzstan
Posts: 5,806
That looks like a Foxtrot class boat. I don't know when you were in the Navy but given your age, it must have been in the 1980s when these boats were already hopelessly outdated.

I also wondered who painted the stars on the sail and the torpedo tubes. Like this it looks a bit like the Disney version of a Soviet submarine.

A 15mm is probably just barely wide enough in there, but for 100% FSU goodness, next time take a Russar MR-2 on a Zorki.

Philipp
__________________
Bing! You're hypnotized!
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #5
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
It was a Whiskey class.
Yea, well it is in LA. You have to expect some embelishments.

I was in the Navy from 1980 to 1986. We never came across anything like this old boat. It was mostly Sierras and Alphas back then.
__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #6
Krosya
Konicaze
 
Krosya's Avatar
 
Krosya is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,476
Very cool! And I really like how CV 15mm lens did in there! If you have any more photos from there - please post!
__________________
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
35mm Rangefinders : Leica M5 and RD1S w/ many M and LTM lenses

Folders
:
Welta Weltur 6x6/645, Welta Weltur 6x9/645


flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #7
ampguy
Registered User
 
ampguy's Avatar
 
ampguy is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 7,019
A good (true) book on identifying the last U-boat off the NJ coastline a few years back is a book called "Shadow Divers". The divers who finally ID'd it used the example in a Chicago museum and photos extensively to know where to dive to look for ID hints in the deteriorated sub. Great read.
__________________
My photo blog

  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #8
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
15mm was ideal in those tight spaces.
Even at f5.6, focus was pretty much not an issue. Certainly I didn't have to worry about infinity in the tight confines of an old sub.
I may have a few more worth posting.
__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #9
FrankS
Registered User
 
FrankS's Avatar
 
FrankS is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Canada, eh.
Age: 62
Posts: 19,391
I couldn't handle being in such a confined space under all that water. Subs and tunnels/caves. It's the stuff of nightmares for me!
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #10
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankS View Post
I couldn't handle being in such a confined space under all that water. Subs and tunnels/caves. It's the stuff of nightmares for me!

If you're the type to think about it, you're screwed. Most people naturally do not think about it. Some people learn not to think about it.
It really was a good way to serve in many ways. In cold war times, it was about as exciting (between long periods of boredom) as it gets without being in an actual shooting war...which would cross the line from exciting to terrifying.
Hard to believe it was only 6 years of my life...since it had such a lasting influence on who I am.
__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #11
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
The wardroom, navigation, and the engine room.







__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter

Last edited by dazedgonebye : 06-08-2008 at 18:36.
  Reply With Quote

an idea
Old 06-08-2008   #12
ampguy
Registered User
 
ampguy's Avatar
 
ampguy is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 7,019
an idea

Interesting. The Germans in WW2 considered them "iron caskets", most knew they weren't coming back.

I suppose if you could rig your lens up to the periscope you could get some nice whale and other ocean nature photos.

How often did you get to land in a port and get some fresh air?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dazedgonebye View Post
If you're the type to think about it, you're screwed. Most people naturally do not think about it. Some people learn not to think about it.
It really was a good way to serve in many ways. In cold war times, it was about as exciting (between long periods of boredom) as it gets without being in an actual shooting war...which would cross the line from exciting to terrifying.
Hard to believe it was only 6 years of my life...since it had such a lasting influence on who I am.
__________________
My photo blog

  Reply With Quote

Old 06-08-2008   #13
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
Things improved considerably after WWII, and having no one actually shoot at you made your odds a heck of a lot better too!
The food starts to run out as you approach 3 months...so sometime before that, we'd have to go in.
We'd be out for as little as a few days for training, or underwater till the food was gone, depending on the needs of the Navy.
__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter
  Reply With Quote

OK, gotcha
Old 06-08-2008   #14
ampguy
Registered User
 
ampguy's Avatar
 
ampguy is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 7,019
OK, gotcha

different decades. I guess it was not like Das Boot or U-571, that's good, nothing could be worse than life like in those times/movies, however exaggerated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dazedgonebye View Post
Things improved considerably after WWII, and having no one actually shoot at you made your odds a heck of a lot better too!
The food starts to run out as you approach 3 months...so sometime before that, we'd have to go in.
We'd be out for as little as a few days for training, or underwater till the food was gone, depending on the needs of the Navy.
__________________
My photo blog

  Reply With Quote

Old 06-09-2008   #15
rxmd
May contain traces of nut
 
rxmd's Avatar
 
rxmd is offline
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Kyrgyzstan
Posts: 5,806
Quote:
Originally Posted by ampguy View Post
different decades. I guess it was not like Das Boot or U-571, that's good, nothing could be worse than life like in those times/movies, however exaggerated.
Das Boot is rather authentic. It helped that the author of the original novel had been a war correspondent on a boat.

U-571 was bad.

I had several ancestors on boats that didn't come back. German submarines had loss rates of about 91% for boats and almost 80% for crew. By 1945 there were 16-year-old sailors and 20-year-old captains. I have great respect for them. An uncle-in-law (is there such a word?) of mine is engineer on a Russian submarine. It's hard for the family, who were living in semi-secret port towns in the far north for years and had no idea where their husband and father was for months on end. On the boat itself it's still bad but there is no comparison. Not having a war helps, of course.
__________________
Bing! You're hypnotized!
  Reply With Quote

You would probably enjoy Shadow Divers very much
Old 06-09-2008   #16
ampguy
Registered User
 
ampguy's Avatar
 
ampguy is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 7,019
You would probably enjoy Shadow Divers very much

The divers went to great length to find the families of those buried in the U-boat they found, and in some cases went to Germany to deliver things and let the families know where their relatives lay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rxmd View Post
Das Boot is rather authentic. It helped that the author of the original novel had been a war correspondent on a boat.

U-571 was bad.

I had several ancestors on boats that didn't come back. German submarines had loss rates of about 91% for boats and almost 80% for crew. By 1945 there were 16-year-old sailors and 20-year-old captains. I have great respect for them. An uncle-in-law (is there such a word?) of mine is engineer on a Russian submarine. It's hard for the family, who were living in semi-secret port towns in the far north for years and had no idea where their husband and father was for months on end. On the boat itself it's still bad but there is no comparison. Not having a war helps, of course.
__________________
My photo blog

  Reply With Quote

Old 06-09-2008   #17
gavinlg
Registered User
 
gavinlg's Avatar
 
gavinlg is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wellington NZ
Posts: 5,092
Awesome stuff - I suspect I'd get claustrophobic in one of those for any long period of time, but I still think they're awesome.

Thanks
__________________
NO PRAISE
@gavinlagrange
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-09-2008   #18
Livesteamer
Registered User
 
Livesteamer is offline
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Winston Salem North Carolina
Posts: 1,420
Great photos and Thanks to all you sailers who man the subs. Another good book to come out recently is "Red Star Under the Baltic." The only WW2 Soviet sub book I have ever read. Very scary and very different from our boats. Joe
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-11-2008   #19
Sam N
Registered User
 
Sam N's Avatar
 
Sam N is offline
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: California
Posts: 563
I remember wishing for a wider lens when I visited the same museum about 1.5 years ago. Very nice use of the 15.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-12-2008   #20
robin a
Registered User
 
robin a's Avatar
 
robin a is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pace,Florida
Age: 70
Posts: 754
Great stuff,Takes a certain kind of guy to "go down" for months on end.I did 23 yrs.on carriers.A whole different ball game...................Robin
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-12-2008   #21
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Pacific NW, USA
Posts: 13,134
Interesting shots, and the 15mm is clearly useful in that cramped space. I enjoyed seeing the insides.

There is (or was, 5 years ago) a Russian sub moored in Port of Seattle, similarly "enhanced" with theatrical Soviet-era markings. Sign says it's a "Cobra" submarine. Here's a shot across the harbor from May 2003...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 030524-50big.jpg (149.2 KB, 14 views)
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-12-2008   #22
dazedgonebye
Registered User
 
dazedgonebye's Avatar
 
dazedgonebye is offline
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Arizona
Age: 58
Posts: 3,927
Looks to be a Foxtrot diesel boat.
I think the whole "cobra," "scorpion" thing is just boob bait for the bubbas. I'm not sure the Soviets named their boats past the hull number. Even the Whiskey/Foxtrot designations I use are just names given by NATO for the class of boat.
__________________
Steve

"And I know now that the cure for my childhood was not to be looked after, as I once believed; it was to look after someone else." ~Philip Norman

Photography Blog
Flickr
Twitter
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-12-2008   #23
maggieo
More Deadly
 
maggieo's Avatar
 
maggieo is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 3,879
Outstanding photos, sailor!!! Well done!

Wish I'd had my 15 when I visited HMS Belfast...
__________________
My Flickr Photostream & My Photo Blog
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 18:24.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.