Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Photography General Interest

Photography General Interest Neat Photo stuff NOT particularly about Rangefinders.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Solar Eclipse!
Old 08-03-2017   #1
giganova
Registered User
 
giganova is offline
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,421
Solar Eclipse!

Hi all!

What are your plans for the solar eclipse on August 21? If you haven't seen one, it will be spectacular!

In order to see a total eclipse, you need to be on the path of totality, which is the gray shaded area in the map below. Problem is, of course, that all hotels along this path have long been booked. But don't worry if you are not along the path; you will be able to see a partial eclipse from everywhere in the Continental US.



I will be in the Rocky Mountains (Sun Valley Idaho) and will look for a cool landscape with a tree in the foreground.

According to the nifty exposure time calculator below, I will set up two Leica M4s on a small travel tripod, loaded with FP4, one with a 21mm and one with a 50mm lens, will set the lens to f/5.6 and will cycle through exposure times of 1/500, 1/125s, 1/30, 1/8, 1/4 and 0.5 sec. This should give me at least a few useable images of the sun's corona and will hopefully not have the un-illuminated foreground too dark. Then I will cycle through 1/30, 1/8, 1/4 and 0.5 sec with the flash on to illuminate the foreground tree a bit. That should take about a minute, which will give me another minute or so to enjoy the eclipse with my own eyes.

  Reply With Quote

Old 08-03-2017   #2
wolves3012
Registered User
 
wolves3012's Avatar
 
wolves3012 is offline
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Wolverhampton, UK
Age: 62
Posts: 2,815
I hope "your own eyes" will include appropriate protection, it's never safe to view eclipses with the naked eye. Hope that's not patronising you but I'd rather say it than someone pays the price.

If you're planning on 21 and 50mm lenses, don't expect to see much of the eclipsed sun in the end result - you'll need more like 500mm+ to achieve anything useful in that sense. That's not to say you can't get artistic shots, if that's your intention.

I took some shots of the 1999 near-total eclipse here, I seem to remember using a 300mm, as that was the longest I had, and a welding-goggle filter. Got a lovely sequence as the moon chipped away and "ate" most of the sun but the FL was a bit on the short side (actually, quite a lot!).
__________________
Zorki: 1e (x2), 2C, 3M, 4, 4K, 5, 6
FED: NKVD, 1g, 2e
Kiev 4, 4A
Leica IIIC
Yashica Minister III
Zenith C, Zenit C, Zenit E
Minolta XG-M, XD-5
Nikon P50
Panasonic Lumix G2, 14-42 Kit lens + 45-150mm

"The way to see by faith is to shut the eye of reason." - Benjamin Franklin
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-03-2017   #3
css9450
Registered User
 
css9450's Avatar
 
css9450 is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,944
We had a partial back in 1994. I remember using my trusty Luna-Pro light meter and getting a reading that was about 3 and a half stops less than sunny bright daylight. So on Kodachrome 64, instead of 1/500th at 5.6 I was shooting somewhere around 1/250 between 2 and 2.8. I didn't shoot AT the sun, just at my surroundings. But since my exposure was correct, they look just like a normal sunny day! It was neat.

I'll probably do something similar this time.
__________________
Nikon S2, S3, F, F2, F3, FM2, FA, N90S, D80, D7000, D750, Sony a6000, Canon IIf, Leica CL, Tower type 3, Zorki 4, Vito B, Perkeo II, Rollei 35....
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-04-2017   #4
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,319
A session with one's favorite search engine will reveal the proper way to photograph eclipses.

As far as I know, the only way to be certain your eyes are safe is to use a ISO certified solar filter. These confrim to the ISO 12312-2 safety standard. Besides blocking visible light, a solar filter blocks UV light.

Unfortunately there are many products out there that claim ISO compliance but lack actual ISO certification. Even a compliant solar filter can be compromised by a scratch in the lens coating.

So study up and be careful.

I am a 90 minute drive from totality. I will not photograph the eclipse. Depending where we end up, there will be approximately 100 to 165 seconds of totality. I decided I want to spend all of those seconds immersed the experiemcing totality instead of fiddleing with my camera.

I am confident there will be plenty of eclipse imagary to enjoy afterwards.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-04-2017   #5
BLKRCAT
99% Film
 
BLKRCAT's Avatar
 
BLKRCAT is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by giganova View Post
But don't worry if you are not along the path; you will be able to see a partial eclipse from everywhere in the Continental US.
when is the Canadian version of the eclipse coming?
__________________
TumblrYoutube
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-04-2017   #6
pharyngula
Registered User
 
pharyngula's Avatar
 
pharyngula is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by willie_901 View Post
I am a 90 minute drive from totality. I will not photograph the eclipse. Depending where we end up, there will be approximately 100 to 165 seconds of totality. I decided I want to spend all of those seconds immersed the experiemcing totality instead of fiddleing with my camera.

I am confident there will be plenty of eclipse imagary to enjoy afterwards.
I could not agree more.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-04-2017   #7
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 70
Posts: 4,625
We live in East Tennessee directly in the path. The exact center is just a few minutes south of us and We'll see a 100% eclipse. Schools are out that day and businesses are cloasing. The little town just a few minutes from us is shutting the Main Street down and the merchants are making a big event of it. Farmers are even setting up for huge cookouts and viewing area in the fields. Hotels are getting booked up too. My wife and I are going to lay back in our chairs on the deck and drink wine and enjoy good food.

In the 70's we had a ~98% here and it's very cool. Streetlites come on, the birds quit singing and the air gets calm.

I bought a filter for my 300 and 1.4 extended and some glasses. I'll see what I get. Be safe and have fun.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-04-2017   #8
rfaspen
Registered User
 
rfaspen's Avatar
 
rfaspen is offline
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 1,683
People in my town are making a killing renting out spare bedrooms. I'm unlucky to have a brother who really wants to see the eclipse..... Just kidding, it will be a tremendous experience to have my brother with me for this once-in-a-lifetime event.

I have cameras at the ready, but I plan to abandon photography if it becomes a chore. The experience is more important and there will be millions upon millions of photos after the big day.

So, I have a D700 with a 400/5.6 set up with the special filter, and a film M with a 50 (summicron), and an M240 that will probably sport the summicron 90. The Nikon will sit on a tripod, the others in my hands. The Nikon will give me those "technical" images I like, including the totality images with corona (my main objective) and the M's will give me "environmental" shots that will show enough of the sun (or moon?) to be obvious eclipse images.

During totality, no filter. Remember that. During partial eclipse, no matter how small that sliver of sun is, you NEED a filter. The sun is one powerful atomic furnace and the tiny sliver at either end of the period of totality will gladly fry your retinas forever (it will fry your Kodak Retina's too). Yeah, that does sound patronizing. Couldn't help it. I've had to deal with teenagers. Parents will know what I mean.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-05-2017   #9
dmr
Registered Abuser
 
dmr's Avatar
 
dmr is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Somewhere in Middle America
Posts: 4,521
16 days 2 go!

This will most likely be my last opportunity to see (and to photograph) a total solar eclipse, and I've convinced myself that I will NOT miss out on this one. I've taken the day off and have "Plans A through F" in mind.

The path of totality is just southwest of me. My Plan A is a spot I've found near Lewiston, NE (translated: Middle Of Nowhere) right in the darkest of the dark.

My biggest concern is crummy weather, so I'm willing to drive a few hours into better weather if need be. I've plotted out locations from roughly Hyannis, NE to Boonville, MO, all in the path of totality, and all reachable within a few hours of drive time from me. I plan to be following the forecasts very closely over the next two weeks!

I'm considering (don't know if I'll go this far, but this is a YOLO experience!), if and only if the weather is gonna be overcast all along the path above, catching an early morning flight to a better location. For example, I can get an early morning nonstop to Portland, rent a car, and haul {expletive} into the Salem area. I've checked with our in-house TA and that flight seldom sells out and since it originates in OMA it's almost never late. Ditto with a similar early morning flight to Atlanta, drive northeast into the toolies. Both are do-able timewise.

I've picked up a 100000 ND filter (some time ago, missing the price gouging) and (please throw soft stones!) I think that in this case the correct tool for the job is one of the d{mumble} cameras. I've been playing around with test shots and more or less settled on ISO 100, 1/500, f/11 for the partial eclipse shots. Here's one of my test shots, taken after those I posted here in another thread.



This is, of course, manual focus, using live view to compose. I've found it somewhat clumsy trying to focus on the sun, so I plan to focus on a far-far away object with the filter off and then pop the filter on. That's what I did for the shot above.

If anyone wants to play with a simulation, here's one of several out there on the Interwebs:

https://eclipsemega.movie/simulator?...40777587890625

There is a SME from NASA posting on this astronomy board who has been most helpful to me. They have a dedicated section for the upcoming eclipse here:

https://www.cloudynights.com/forum/1...-eclipse-2017/

The postings in that section appear to pass sanity checks. I've also found that there's a lot of misinformation out there.

Anyway, I'm excited about it, and look forward to seeing what everyone here (and elsewhere) has to show on that Tuesday.
__________________
My (NEW) Gallery
My Blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-07-2017   #10
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,489
I guess people are gonna get crazy?

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/201...ural-disaster/
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-07-2017   #11
john_s
Registered User
 
john_s is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 851
I know there's lots of info out there, but wanted to mention that in one of the Ansel Adams books there is a recommendation for pyrocatechol development to control extreme contrast that you might get with an eclipse.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-07-2017   #12
ornate_wrasse
Moderator
 
ornate_wrasse's Avatar
 
ornate_wrasse is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,215
I live in Oregon and the path of totality is about an hour and a half drive from here in normal conditions. I plan on driving to Albany, OR where a friend has offered to let me stay at his house. Part of the drive will be on I-5 which I expect will be full of eclipse-related traffic. The drive may end up taking many hours :-(

My daughter, who is an attorney, lives in Redmond, OR and normally it is a drive of about 20-30 minutes to the courthouse in Madras, OR where she works defending clients. On the day of the eclipse, that drive is expected to take over 5 hours! She is debating what to do as her job necessitates her being at the courthouse and she cannot take the day off as most people would do.
__________________
Images

www.pbase.com/ornate_wrasse

Leica M9, Leica M6, Leica M3 - 21mm 3.4 Super Angulon, 28mm 2.8 Elmarit, 35mm Summicron, Nikkor SC 50mm 1.4, Carl Zeiss Jena 50mm 1.5, CV 75mm 2.5, Nikkor 8.5cm 2.0

Mamiya 6 - 50mm f4, 75mm f3.5, 150mm f4.5

Fuji X-Pro1 - 16-55mm f/2.8, 27mm f/2.8
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-07-2017   #13
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,489
Quote:
Originally Posted by ornate_wrasse View Post
I live in Oregon and the path of totality is about an hour and a half drive from here in normal conditions. I plan on driving to Albany, OR where a friend has offered to let me stay at his house. Part of the drive will be on I-5 which I expect will be full of eclipse-related traffic. The drive may end up taking many hours :-(

My daughter, who is an attorney, lives in Redmond, OR and normally it is a drive of about 20-30 minutes to the courthouse in Madras, OR where she works defending clients. On the day of the eclipse, that drive is expected to take over 5 hours! She is debating what to do as her job necessitates her being at the courthouse and she cannot take the day off as most people would do.
I'd camp out, rather than having to work after sitting in traffic for hours. When I have morning appointments away from home, I leave a day early (late evening)and stay in a motel, rather than get up at 3am to drive to a 9am appointment in order to miss 2 hours of bad freeway traffic. It cost a little, but really improved my life. Work/meetings go better too.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-07-2017   #14
davidnewtonguitars
Family Snaps
 
davidnewtonguitars's Avatar
 
davidnewtonguitars is offline
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Beaumont, TX
Posts: 1,391
In Texas in March 1970 I set up my Pentax H1a w/ a 200mm lens in the parking lot where I worked. I don't remember what preparations I made for the camera as for filters n stuff, but I got some pretty good shots of what passed for a corona, the negatives are still in a box of stuff out back. I made one of those cardboard box pinhole deals to watch it with, and passed it around to people who wandered up.
I didn't even give this eclipse a thought until my older brother called to say he needed someone to go with him to Nebraska. I'm always up for a road-trip, and I'll take snaps, but not of the sun this time.
He says all the buzz says to "plan for trouble" as the route of totality could be packed with crazies.
What film would be best if a riot ensues, or heretics are burned? Color, huh?
__________________
Leica M2 / 7artisans 35-f2 / Leitz Summitar
http://davidnewtonguitars.squarespace.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-07-2017   #15
ornate_wrasse
Moderator
 
ornate_wrasse's Avatar
 
ornate_wrasse is offline
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
I'd camp out, rather than having to work after sitting in traffic for hours. When I have morning appointments away from home, I leave a day early (late evening)and stay in a motel,
Your plan would work for "normal" times. However, every hotel, motel, camping spot and even the lawns of private homes have been totally booked in Madras, Oregon for probably a year or more.

I read that probably a million people will be coming to Oregon to experience the eclipse, an increase of 25% in a state that has a total population of 4 million.
__________________
Images

www.pbase.com/ornate_wrasse

Leica M9, Leica M6, Leica M3 - 21mm 3.4 Super Angulon, 28mm 2.8 Elmarit, 35mm Summicron, Nikkor SC 50mm 1.4, Carl Zeiss Jena 50mm 1.5, CV 75mm 2.5, Nikkor 8.5cm 2.0

Mamiya 6 - 50mm f4, 75mm f3.5, 150mm f4.5

Fuji X-Pro1 - 16-55mm f/2.8, 27mm f/2.8
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-07-2017   #16
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,489
Quote:
Originally Posted by ornate_wrasse View Post
Your plan would work for "normal" times. However, every hotel, motel, camping spot and even the lawns of private homes have been totally booked in Madras, Oregon for probably a year or more.

I read that probably a million people will be coming to Oregon to experience the eclipse, an increase of 25% in a state that has a total population of 4 million.
Suggest your daughter take a sleeping bag and a change of clothes to work? I would avoid that mess of people if possible. I've seen an eclipse or two. I wasn't overly impressed. I would rather watch a big storm.

That's a lot of people.

Have fun.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-08-2017   #17
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmr View Post

I've picked up a 100000 ND filter (some time ago, missing the price gouging) and (please throw soft stones!) I think that in this case the correct tool for the job is one of the d{mumble} cameras. I've been playing around with test shots and more or less settled on ISO 100, 1/500, f/11 for the partial eclipse shots. Here's one of my test shots, taken after those I posted here in another thread.
Considering how carefully you've planned for the 21st, I apologize in advance if you have a plan in place to fully protect your vision while photographing pre and post-totality scenes.

Please research for yourself the how come UV protection is essential for eye safety during all but the 100 to 180 seconds of totality. A 1000 X ND filter is useful for non-totality exposures. But, speaking for myself, I would not assume it will protect my eyes.

Solar filters that are available for photography.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-08-2017   #18
Larry Cloetta
Registered User
 
Larry Cloetta is offline
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jackson, WY
Age: 69
Posts: 1,523
What follows is a copy of an email I got recently from a friend locally (we are in the path of totality) which some might find interesting and add some perspective. He had attached a couple of photos of the sun with this setup, but copying those into the message box here doesn't happen.
I've seen a total before, and, personally, I'm just going to watch this one, and enjoy it.
As a side note, here, as in much of the West, it's wildfire season. Which means smoke. If the eclipse were to happen today, I doubt that any of the thousands of people who booked extremely expensive hotel rooms and extravagant "eclipse packages" here 18 months ago would end up seeing very much at all. In two weeks it's anyone's guess.

Anyway, what follows is a small bit of information on how taking pictures of the eclipse is done if you're an astronomer, and it's just something you do:

I have been getting ready for the eclipse and one of the things I am going to do is to image the sun leading up to and after totality. For this I purchased a solar filter that has a 0.5 Angstrom pass band at the Hydrogen alpha wavelength where one of the prominent solar emission lies. This filter is mounted on my 85mm Takahashi telescope which rides on top of my 6” Takahashi. I bought that telescope telling my self I would use it for imaging but up to now it has just been the telescope for guiding the larger one. The camera used is a Canon 5Dmk iii which has been modified to allow IR radiation to pass through. Attached are two images. The first is one showing half the sun and there is some nice detail showing of the sun spots and waves of filaments on the surface. The second image is the same but zoomed in by 8X and there is some much higher detail which I think are spicules that make up the chromosphere top layer of the sun. To see this you may have to zoom in some more. There is a great deal of study trying to understand what causes these.
In addition to imaging with the solar filter using the 85mm telescope I will also image the sun during totality using the 6” Takahashi with no filter. It will be programmed ahead of time and I hope to get images of the corona as well as the diamond ring and Bailey’s beads that occur seconds before and after totality. The camera will be a Canon 5D Mk iv which I acquired this year.
Best, Mike
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-15-2017   #19
giganova
Registered User
 
giganova is offline
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,421
Do you think I could capture cool scenes with a 21mm lens on B&W film? Will the eclipsed Sun be too small to see that it is an eclipse?

My plan was to set my M4 with the 21/3.4 SA on a tripod, with a great scenery in the Rocky Mountains where I will be, and cycle through 1/500 sec to 1 sec exposures.

I was also wondering whether I should put a red filter in the lens. This would give pitch black skies with a B&W film but won't affect the sun's penumbra.

Any thoughts?
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-15-2017   #20
skucera
Registered User
 
skucera's Avatar
 
skucera is offline
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Harrisburg, Oregon, USA
Posts: 274
My house is in an area that will be approximate 99.6 totality. That's good enough for my wife, so she's thinking about drinking mimosas in the back yard and enjoying that. My middle daughter and I are slightly more ambitious, so we'll drive about 15 miles north into the totality zone.

I've seen several partial eclipses over the years, all of them above the clouds. So, in past years, I've seen the clouds darken and the street lights come on, but I've never seen the sun itself at that moment. In fact, the joke in Oregon is that if there is any sort of special astral or celestial event will be cloudy, but with any luck at all the forecast will hold and we'll have a clear sky. I'm crossing my fingers, because if it is cloudy, I'll just drink mimosas with my wife in the back yard.

I'm hoping that it is clear, because I want to put my old 500mm catadioptric telephoto to work to get a good shot of the penumbra. My Canon and Konica cameras won't be damaged by the intense magnification of direct sunlight, unlike my Leica or any of my digital cameras.

Scott
__________________
1917 No. 1A Autographic Kodak Junior
1940 Kodak 35 Rangefinder
1955 Leica M3
1969 Canon New Canonet QL17-L
1976 Konica Autoreflex T3n
1977 Canon 110ED 20
1979 Minox 35 GL
1979 Olympus XA
1980 Pentax Auto 110
1987 Polaroid Spectra
1996 Canon EOS Elan IIe
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-15-2017   #21
Daryl J.
Registered User
 
Daryl J. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 377
I'm ten minutes away from the north limit of the shadow in Portland. Work is near the middle of the shadow but we cancelled the day on account of the area going nuts with transit issues.

I saw the one in 79. It was awesome. So what I may do is shoot my Cinestill 800T outdoors that's in my Leica IIf/3.5 Elmar 5cm. Unless the marine air is overhead. In which case I'll read a book. And it sounds like we will be socked in with clouds until about noon......
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-16-2017   #22
Phil_F_NM
Camera hacker
 
Phil_F_NM's Avatar
 
Phil_F_NM is offline
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Age: 43
Posts: 3,975
Bethanne and I are going to our favorite cemetery, if it isn't overcast. Heck, we go there when it IS overcast anyways, so we might be there. I'll take my 4x5 and a few film holders with. I'm not getting caught up in the gear of this all. I think too many people get that mindset and instead of experiencing life, they just witness it behind a window or through a tunnel of sorts. Anyway, I'll have my camera pointed at the ground, looking at all the crescent shaped points of light that the holes between the leaves will be projecting like so many pinhole cameras. Actually, I may bring my pinhole camera as well, stick a ND4 filter on it and shoot a 3 minute exposure which will capture the entirety of the event. I can't get caught up in gear though! I've done that too much in the past. Two large format cameras, pointed at the ground. That's it.
We'll enjoy the birds and maybe see a groundhog.

Phil Forrest
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-16-2017   #23
froyd
Registered User
 
froyd's Avatar
 
froyd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmr View Post
16 days 2 go!



This is, of course, manual focus, using live view to compose. I've found it somewhat clumsy trying to focus on the sun, so I plan to focus on a far-far away object with the filter off and then pop the filter on. That's what I did for the shot above.

Why not set the lens to infinity?
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-16-2017   #24
css9450
Registered User
 
css9450's Avatar
 
css9450 is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by froyd View Post
Why not set the lens to infinity?
Might be that the lens goes beyond infinity. Turn it until it stops and everything will be out of focus.
__________________
Nikon S2, S3, F, F2, F3, FM2, FA, N90S, D80, D7000, D750, Sony a6000, Canon IIf, Leica CL, Tower type 3, Zorki 4, Vito B, Perkeo II, Rollei 35....
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-16-2017   #25
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 70
Posts: 4,625
Quote:
Originally Posted by giganova View Post
Do you think I could capture cool scenes with a 21mm lens on B&W film? Will the eclipsed Sun be too small to see that it is an eclipse?

My plan was to set my M4 with the 21/3.4 SA on a tripod, with a great scenery in the Rocky Mountains where I will be, and cycle through 1/500 sec to 1 sec exposures.

I was also wondering whether I should put a red filter in the lens. This would give pitch black skies with a B&W film but won't affect the sun's penumbra.

Any thoughts?
A 21 will give you a tiny speck in the sky. You also run the risk of burning a hole in the shutter before and after the total eclipse.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-16-2017   #26
JoeV
Thin Air, Bright Sun
 
JoeV's Avatar
 
JoeV is offline
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA
Posts: 1,703
Here's my recent video on how to make a pinhole eclipse viewing telescope.

~Joe
__________________
"If your eye is clear, your whole body will be full of light"

Inventor of the Light Pipe Array
My Blog
My latest book
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-16-2017   #27
dmr
Registered Abuser
 
dmr's Avatar
 
dmr is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Somewhere in Middle America
Posts: 4,521
Quote:
Originally Posted by froyd View Post
Why not set the lens to infinity?
This was discussed over on the astronomy board (as well as here in another totally unrelated topic) and the consensus is clearly that setting the lens hard at the infinity stop is a Bad Thing {tm}.
__________________
My (NEW) Gallery
My Blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-16-2017   #28
Richard G
Registered User
 
Richard G's Avatar
 
Richard G is offline
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 37,47 S
Posts: 5,175
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLKRCAT View Post
when is the Canadian version of the eclipse coming?
The Canadian version is not as well made......
__________________
Richard
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-17-2017   #29
farlymac
PF McFarland
 
farlymac's Avatar
 
farlymac is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 6,237
I'm right on the line for 90%, and that's good enough for me (Otherwise I'd have to drive darn near 300 miles towards the TN/NC border for a view of tonality). Won't be shooting any sun photos though. A viewer box may come in handy for sharing with the neighbors. Will have to go looking for the dapple on the ground as no trees in the immediate vicinity. If it isn't raining or cloudy that is. This valley is notorious for ruining astronomical events.

PF
__________________
Waiting for the light
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-18-2017   #30
B-9
Devin Bro
 
B-9's Avatar
 
B-9 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,239
We are planning a 6 hour drive south to view. No reservations just going to drive until we find a nice dirt road to tailgate on then trek back home for work.

No intention on photographing the eclipse as many images will be available after by people much better prepared with deeper pockets.

We will be bringing one of my telescopes, likely the Tasco 14T I restored last fall it has attachments for solar projection, should work fine for us to view the eclipse indirectly.
__________________
Made in Michigan

RangefinderGuy @ Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-18-2017   #31
giganova
Registered User
 
giganova is offline
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by B-9 View Post
We are planning a 6 hour drive south to view. No reservations just going to drive until we find a nice dirt road to tailgate on then trek back home for work.
You better leave the night before. With millions of people migrating from all sides to this narrow strip of totality, what would otherwise be a 6 hour drive will likely become a 12 hour drive.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-18-2017   #32
froyd
Registered User
 
froyd's Avatar
 
froyd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,113
70% cloud cover predicted for where I'll be... I guess I'll just be looking at clouds changing to various shades of brightness unless the forecast changes. On a positve note, overcast skies will make for good portrait photography
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-18-2017   #33
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
A 21 will give you a tiny speck in the sky. You also run the risk of burning a hole in the shutter before and after the total eclipse.
Details, details...


But fair warning.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-18-2017   #34
taemo
Registered User
 
taemo is offline
Join Date: Apr 2012
Age: 34
Posts: 1,082
boggles me that we have to remind people not to stare at the eclipse (sun).

dont really care for this phenomenon but looking forward to the thousands of pictures at the comfort of my phone
__________________
earldieta.com - flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-18-2017   #35
skucera
Registered User
 
skucera's Avatar
 
skucera is offline
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Harrisburg, Oregon, USA
Posts: 274
Yup, and my sister asked yesterday if pointing her cell phone at the sun during the eclipse might damage its camera, and I confirmed that it would and that she should protect it with the same sort of eclipse glasses that she's going to use for her eyes. That's when she had that "aha" moment because she was just going to look up at the sun from her place of work without any eye protection. She's looking for glasses or welding goggles now. She's getting some for our mom too. They're both up in the Portland area, so they'll have 99% coverage.

Scott
__________________
1917 No. 1A Autographic Kodak Junior
1940 Kodak 35 Rangefinder
1955 Leica M3
1969 Canon New Canonet QL17-L
1976 Konica Autoreflex T3n
1977 Canon 110ED 20
1979 Minox 35 GL
1979 Olympus XA
1980 Pentax Auto 110
1987 Polaroid Spectra
1996 Canon EOS Elan IIe
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-18-2017   #36
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Pacific NW, USA
Posts: 13,053
Scott, it's a bit scary to think just how many people will make that unthinking mistake!
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-19-2017   #37
froyd
Registered User
 
froyd's Avatar
 
froyd is offline
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by skucera View Post
Yup, and my sister asked yesterday if pointing her cell phone at the sun during the eclipse might damage its camera, and I confirmed that it would and that she should protect it with the same sort of eclipse glasses that she's going to use for her eyes. That's when she had that "aha" moment because she was just going to look up at the sun from her place of work without any eye protection. She's looking for glasses or welding goggles now. She's getting some for our mom too. They're both up in the Portland area, so they'll have 99% coverage.

Scott
She might find the same shortage of both glasses and welder's masks that we have in my area. Some people are selling paper frame eclipse glasses for $50 a pair!

As a photographer, and a good brother, why don't you give your sister a nice present and develop a roll of BW film, preferably in 120 format after unspooling it in bright light? According to the NASA site and other authoritative sources, fully dense/black silver-based film is an appropriate filter for solar rays. I've used this method several years ago and it works very well. If you use 120, you have enough material to cut the film into the shape of an eye mask, but that's gettin' awful fancy.
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-19-2017   #38
B-9
Devin Bro
 
B-9's Avatar
 
B-9 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,239
Quote:
Originally Posted by giganova View Post
You better leave the night before. With millions of people migrating from all sides to this narrow strip of totality, what would otherwise be a 6 hour drive will likely become a 12 hour drive.
very true,

We do plan to leave Sunday afternoon in anticipation of serious traffic.

Here in mid-Michigan the wal-mart, meijer, and even the tractor supply stores are sold out of glasses and welding masks.

The local eye glass store made out like bandits, there was literally a line of people waiting outside for "Official NASA Eclipse Glasses" last week.

I have seen on Facebook people from our area driving over an hour east/west to find any kind of glass or spectacles to view with. Frantic pleas for known locations with glasses in stock...

It going to be crazy... how many will actually try to view this event with their naked eyes
__________________
Made in Michigan

RangefinderGuy @ Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-20-2017   #39
willie_901
Registered User
 
willie_901's Avatar
 
willie_901 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,319
Some cardboard viewing glasses are certified by ISO to comply with the ISO 12312-2 solar-filter safety standard.

Some cardboard viewing glasses have an ISO logo (but no ISO 12312-2 text). One can not find documentation or only incomplete documentation regarding authentic ISO compliance. Some sellers offer on-line documents from non-ISO labs that claim although there is no actual ISO certification, the solar film meets the ISO12312-2 standard.

Amazon has automatically refunded the purchase price of all solar protection products if the sellers can not provide Amazon a complete set of ISO certification documents. About three weeks ago NASA and other legitimate organizations published a list of ISO certificated manufacturers and the companies who sell these products. Other professional astronomy organizations published similar lists.

Solar filters for viewing and photography do three things:
  1. attenuate visible light energy brightness by at least 16 stops
  2. filter IR to levels that will not damage the retina
  3. filter UV above 800 nm to levels that will not damage the retina

The main cause of retina damage is phototoxicity rather than thermal burning. Initially, retinal biochemistry is disrupted because of molecular damage. Then molecular oxidation products cause further damage to retinal cellular function.

The primary cause of camera damage would be excessive temperatures.

Materials that can achieve [1] may, or may not achieve [2] and, or [3].

Products that actually comply with ISO12312-2 do all of these.
__________________
Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-20-2017   #40
charjohncarter
Registered User
 
charjohncarter's Avatar
 
charjohncarter is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Danville, CA, USA
Posts: 8,775
I got some glasses from B&H, I'll check with them before tomorrow. Thanks for that.

EDIT: I checked, B&H claims to comply with 1.2.3.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:11.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.