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Optics Theory - This forum is aimed towards the TECHNICAL side of photographic OPTICS THEORY. There will be some overlap by camera/manufacturer, but this forum is for the heavy duty tech discussions. This is NOT the place to discuss a specific lens or lens line, do that in the appropriate forum. This is the forum to discuss optics or lenses in general, to learn about the tech behind the lenses and images. IF you have a question about a specific lens, post it in the forum about that type of camera, NOT HERE.

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Kubrick`s Lenses
Old 04-23-2017   #1
Michael Markey
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Kubrick`s Lenses

I found this interesting ..... especially his use of modified stills lenses

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fb7Meqaz7Aw
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Old 04-23-2017   #2
ferider
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Thank you much for sharing, Michael.
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Old 04-23-2017   #3
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My thanks as well Michael. This makes me want to go back and revisit Barry Lyndon! I remember seeing it right when it opened in NYC that it was visually very rich.....but I didn't give any thought to that aspect of the film other than to be taken in
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Old 04-23-2017   #4
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Keep in mind that still lenses used in cinematraphy are not always a good idea in part because most still lenses eat more light then a lens designed for motion picture work.


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Old 04-23-2017   #5
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Great video, I much enjoyed the information.
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Old 04-23-2017   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by filmtwit View Post
Keep in mind that still lenses used in cinematraphy are not always a good idea in part because most still lenses eat more light then a lens designed for motion picture work.....
So a motion picture F-stop is different than a still camera F-stop? I donít follow.

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Old 04-23-2017   #7
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in cinema we operate t-stops not f-stops, f-stop is the measurement of the opening of the lens, the t-stop is how much light actually makes it to the sensor, there's always some transmission loses. It basically means your f1.4 is closer to T1.7 or T1.8, in cinema there's no place for exposure miscalculations.
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Old 04-23-2017   #8
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Fascinating. Thank you.
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Old 04-23-2017   #9
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Yes ... thanks for the clarification
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Old 04-23-2017   #10
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Thank you for the links ,PKR
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Old 04-23-2017   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlos Cruz View Post
in cinema we operate t-stops not f-stops, f-stop is the measurement of the opening of the lens, the t-stop is how much light actually makes it to the sensor, there's always some transmission loses. It basically means your f1.4 is closer to T1.7 or T1.8, in cinema there's no place for exposure miscalculations.
Iím aware of this, but thereís no reason you canít convert a still-camera lens from F-stop to T-stop. Kubrick used all sort of still camera lenses on his movie cameras. With good results too, I may say.

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Old 04-23-2017   #12
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That's really cool Michael. Back in the day I had an Arrilfex IIC and a complete set of Cooke Speed Panchro lenses (18mm SerIII, 25mm SerIII, 32mm SerII, 40mm SerII, 50mm SerII and 75mm SerII). Sold the whole lot for $11,000 before the prices really skyrocketed. Big regrets. The Speed Panchro's had such a lovely rendering on 35mm motion picture film.

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Old 04-23-2017   #13
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There is a translation error in the French subtitles. The Kilfitt Macro is 90mm, not 19mm.
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Old 04-23-2017   #14
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I don't get it. Other than stopping down, how can you add depth of field to a lens?
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Old 04-23-2017   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lukitas View Post
I don't get it. Other than stopping down, how can you add depth of field to a lens?
Yeah, I was gonna ask that, too. Maybe by sacrificing some resolution to get uniform sharpness, rather than maximum sharpness, over a range of distances? After all, there is no such thing as a free lunch--you can't outwit mother nature.
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Old 04-23-2017   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lukitas View Post
I don't get it. Other than stopping down, how can you add depth of field to a lens?
Take a look at this lengthy document:

https://www.zeiss.com/content/dam/Ph...cial_bokeh.pdf

On page 41+ it has some examples. Basically it seems you can improve sharpness for out-of-focus regions, but with other tradeoffs in image quality.
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Old 04-23-2017   #17
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If anyone here has not watched his movie, "Barry Lyndon" (in which he used the famous ultra fast lens) I would encourage you to do so. It is one of his very best films especially in terms of cinematography and design. He went to extraordinary lengths to be authentic. This is his reason for using the fast lens - some scenes are filmed entirely in candle light because that is how they would have been lit, back in the day. The muskets used in battle scenes were authentic and the British redcoats were actually custom made using original styles and and even original color dyes. This guy was a maniac for authenticity. And it shows to any history buff (or film buff) watching the movie. One of his best!
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Old 04-23-2017   #18
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A detailed look... http://www.visual-memory.co.uk/sk/ac/len/page1.htm

Interestingly these lenses are available for rent. I believe for the camera and lens combo it is like 3500 pounds a day!
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Old 04-23-2017   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helenhill View Post
Great Michael, Thans for that !

Loved that Kubrick would order 10 lenses and then decide which BEST fit his needs...
That's a Luxury I would love to have.
Yes Helen, and when he talks about the early Zeiss & Schneider lenses, they were made about the same time as many of the Leica lenses we discuss on this forum. And according to the video, most lenses were hand ground at that time. I've seen many of the Zeiss & Schneider lenses in ARRI standard mount that he talks about and the variation in optical quality is quite apparent. If the Leica lenses were also hand ground at the time, I wonder how the variation applies to those old lenses?

Did Cartier-Bresson sort thru multiple copies of the same Leitz lens to find the best sample? I have read of David Douglas Duncan doing just that with the early Nikkor glass.

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Old 04-23-2017   #20
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Also fun is the difference between spherical and anamorphic lenses. I keep meaning to acquire one or two fun anamorphics for my cine work.
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Old 04-23-2017   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquark View Post
Take a look at this lengthy document:

https://www.zeiss.com/content/dam/Ph...cial_bokeh.pdf

On page 41+ it has some examples. Basically it seems you can improve sharpness for out-of-focus regions, but with other tradeoffs in image quality.
Yeah, that's what I meant. DOF is "acceptable unsharpness." So if the in-focus image isn't too sharp, then you can't tell that the OOF part is any less less sharp by comparison. It's all relative. At least up to a point.
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Old 04-23-2017   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob-F View Post
Yeah, that's what I meant. DOF is "acceptable unsharpness." So if the in-focus image isn't too sharp, then you can't tell that the OOF part is any less less sharp by comparison. It's all relative. At least up to a point.
I have noticed that comparing a Sonnar-type lens to an Elmar-type that there is a more pronounced out of focus background look on the Sonnar. I'm talking about the same focal length and aperture, and the background is out of focus with both, but the defocused objects seem more discernible on the Elmar.
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