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I just joined the Micro Four Thirds club!
Old 02-25-2018   #1
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I just joined the Micro Four Thirds club!

For many years, all of my digital work was shot with large fullframe SLRs. The Canon 5DmkII and a set of lenses for it have been my main kit for color work for the last six years. The image quality was magnificent, and the camera has been reliable, but I've gotten to the point where I just cannot carry that much weight around anymore.

I'm someone who carries a camera EVERYWHERE I go, and with all of my health problems, I needed something smaller and lighter.

For 35mm film, I have used the Olympus OM system since I was a kid. They were the ideal cameras for me; tiny, light, well built, and excellent lenses. I wanted a digital version. I thought of going with a Fuji Xpro-2 or X-T2, but I don't like the Xtrans sensor.

I started thinking about Olympus again. I had always thought the M4/3 sensors were too small, but I began looking at images made with them, and decided to try one. I bought a Pen-F and two Olympus lenses, the 17mm f1.8 (35mm) and the 45mm f1.8 (90mm).

Once I got all the settings figured out, I have been VERY impressed. The images are slightly noisier than those from the Canon at the same ISO settings, but Lightroom's noise reduction eliminates it without losing detail. I think I like the tone and color reproduction better on the Olympus!

Here's a few snapshots I have done to test it out:


17mm lens, ISO-200



My son! He'll be 21 next month. Shot with the 45mm lens, ISO-400



My mother's fat cat. 45mm lens, ISO-3200



17mm lens, ISO-200



Same image as above, converted to Black & White in Nik Silver Efex 2. The files make beautiful BW images with less processing than my Canon camera's files did.


So far I love the camera. My only complaint is that it has way too many buttons all over it. The control layout is too complex; most of the buttons are ones I would never use. I love the small size, the tiny lenses, the in-body IS, and the image quality.
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Old 02-25-2018   #2
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Cool...Congrats Chris, Looks Good !

I always loved the Olympus Om’s and the digital E1
Have not tried the Pen F but would love to
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Old 02-25-2018   #3
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Originally Posted by helenhill View Post
Cool...Congrats Chris, Looks Good !
+1

234567890 enough characters already?
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Old 02-25-2018   #4
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Enjoy the new gear. Is transitioning to the electronic viewfinder hard?

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Old 02-25-2018   #5
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Congrats, Chris. I have been using the old model OM M4/3 cameras a lot. I love them particularly for portraits. I set the camera to Natural Color.
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Old 02-25-2018   #6
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My only slight disappointments with M43 over FF are..........

- The crop factor can be an issue when shooting wide angle. Mostly I prefer to shoot longer lenses so it is not a major problem but sometimes I need to go wider. I purchased a rectilinear Samyang 12mm f 2 for this purpose. (And in any event who would have thought an f2 12mm to be achievable a few years ago - well it maybe would not have been if not for smaller sensors).
- In general M43 cameras do not have the best dynamic range compared even with APS sensors let alone FF ones but they are still good up to say 1600 ISO and getting better by the year (we forget that compared to film this is still way ahead).
- The focus speed and certainty is still a tiny bit behind DSLRs in my estimation but that is also getting better and better. For example I recently bought a 2nd hand Panasonic GX7 and think its better than the Olympus OM D EM5 in this regard though they are both pretty new cameras so its changing quite rapidly.
- For manual focus I still prefer the MF confirmation system my Nikon D700 uses - a bright green dot lights up in the VF when the subject is in focus. Full stop! This system is simple, fast and reliable. Much faster to use in practice than any focus peaking on any non mirror camera I have ever used (I find that focus peaking is not reliable enough for critical focus with fast lenses so I still have to enlarge the VF image to check and refine focus even if FP says its in focus. This slows things down enough to miss a lot of shots).

Against this of course is the size and weight of the M43 (I now almost always use my M43 cameras when traveling by plane due to cabin baggage restrictions etc). Also the ability to adapt any number of vintage lenses for use on an M43 is invaluable for gear heads like me.

In general therefore despite some shortcomings I still think it is worth it.

Having said that a friend has asked me to take some shots in a nightclub venue for an opening night and I know it will be dark and require good dynamic response. I will be using my D700 and a good system flash for that without doubt. I just know an M43 will struggle. (A Sony A7 would not however so there are other options too).

PS My experience is that it is ALWAYS necessary with these cameras to play with the menu settings - often things like noise reduction are set too high resulting in poorer outcomes for people who prefer to fix these things in post processing using more sophisticated tools. I have to say that every M43 camera I have used has complex menu systems though making mastery and exercise in frustration.
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Old 02-25-2018   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterm1 View Post
My only slight disappointments with M43 over FF are..........

- The crop factor can be an issue when shooting wide angle. Mostly I prefer to shoot longer lenses so it is not a major problem but sometimes I need to go wider. I purchased a rectilinear Samyang 12mm f 2 for this purpose. (And in any event who would have thought an f2 12mm to be achievable a few years ago - well it maybe would not have been if not for smaller sensors).
One thing I have found is that sharpness loss due to diffraction is a bigger issue with the very short focal length lenses used for wideangles on Micro 4/3 than it is on fullframe. My 17mm Olympus lens is incredibly sharp wide open down to f8. Smaller apertures, the images are very soft. Doesn't matter, as a 17mm lens at f8 has incredible depth of field. Its something I didn't think of when I first got it, and I had to figure it out by testing.

Quote:
- In general M43 cameras do not have the best dynamic range compared even with APS sensors let alone FF ones but they are still good up to say 1600 ISO and getting better by the year (we forget that compared to film this is still way ahead).
I haven't noticed this so far. Mine seems to have similar dynamic range to my Canon 5DmkII. I am going to profile the Olympus camera with my Sekonic L-758DR meter, and that will tell us exactly how it compares in dynamic range to the fullframe Canon.

Quote:
- The focus speed and certainty is still a tiny bit behind DSLRs in my estimation but that is also getting better and better. For example I recently bought a 2nd hand Panasonic GX7 and think its better than the Olympus OM D EM5 in this regard though they are both pretty new cameras so its changing quite rapidly.
- For manual focus I still prefer the MF confirmation system my Nikon D700 uses - a bright green dot lights up in the VF when the subject is in focus. Full stop! This system is simple, fast and reliable. Much faster to use in practice than any focus peaking on any non mirror camera I have ever used (I find that focus peaking is not reliable enough for critical focus with fast lenses so I still have to enlarge the VF image to check and refine focus even if FP says its in focus. This slows things down enough to miss a lot of shots).
Focus speed is good enough for me, I do not shoot sports or wildlife. I have never liked the focus confirmation systems in SLRs. The problem is, every single AF SLR I have ever owned, both film and digital, eventually went out of calibration. My Canon does not focus accurately anymore. That means the focus confirm light is off, too. I installed a focus screen in my Canon that has microprism focusing aids in the center, and I manually focus everything with it.

The Olympus focuses accurately, and mirrorless systems cannot go out of calibration, so its nice to have one that works.

Quote:
Against this of course is the size and weight of the M43 (I now almost always use my M43 cameras when traveling by plane due to cabin baggage restrictions etc). Also the ability to adapt any number of vintage lenses for use on an M43 is invaluable for gear heads like me.

In general therefore despite some shortcomings I still think it is worth it.
The size and weight is the big thing for me. I am in extremely bad health now. I just cannot carry a big SLR everywhere like I used to.

Quote:
PS My experience is that it is ALWAYS necessary with these cameras to play with the menu settings - often things like noise reduction are set too high resulting in poorer outcomes for people who prefer to fix these things in post processing using more sophisticated tools. I have to say that every M43 camera I have used has complex menu systems though making mastery and exercise in frustration.
I agree; the menu system is horrible on my Olympus. Way too complex.
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Old 02-25-2018   #8
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Here's some I shot this afternoon at my favorite book store:


17mm lens, ISO-200



17mm lens, ISO-3200



17mm lens, ISO-3200. Kitty was annoyed by the toddler in the background.



17mm lens, ISO-3200
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Old 02-25-2018   #9
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Congrats on your new Pen-F. I really enjoy using mine and the 17/1.8 makes for a nice small and versatile kit that I use frequently. I have many of the µ4/3 primes and just enjoy the overall size and quality of the camera and lenses. The 12/2, 15/1.7, 20/1.7, and 25/1.4 are other primes, besides the two you mentioned, I use a lot. I enjoyed all the pics you posted and wish you the best with your new Pen-F.
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Old 02-25-2018   #10
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I shoot primarily m4/3 these days (G85 and Gx8) for the same reason you do...after decades of carrying heavy cameras, my body just doesn't want to do that anymore. If I have to shoot in a really dark place, I take the Canon 80D, though. That thing can focus in the dark!

Those are some great photos you posted. Looks like the Olympus will serve you well.
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Old 02-25-2018   #11
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Good stuff. I paired my m43 camera with the Panasonic 12-32 pancake zoom. Ming Thein recommended it, and he is serious about equipment so I figured if he says it's good, it's good.
He's right. (I also have the Oly 25 1.8 and 45 1.8, but for daytime outside use it's the zoom that gets the most use. As you have found out, that 45 is a cracker of a lens).
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Old 02-25-2018   #12
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Quote:
- In general M43 cameras do not have the best dynamic range compared even with APS sensors let alone FF ones but they are still good up to say 1600 ISO and getting better by the year (we forget that compared to film this is still way ahead).
I haven't noticed this so far. Mine seems to have similar dynamic range to my Canon 5DmkII. I am going to profile the Olympus camera with my Sekonic L-758DR meter, and that will tell us exactly how it compares in dynamic range to the fullframe Canon.


In relation to this and to clarify, I am thinking mainly of low light performance where a good deal of noise can still show up -more in my experience than with FF cameras like my D700 even though its a generation or two behind. However in good light my m43 cameras - especially the more recent ones - perform creditably. and are easily able to capture both highlight and shadow areas well.

One thing I should add as a general benefit of M43 is the sharpness of many of its best native lenses. I own the 30mm f2.8 Sigma, 45mm f1.8 Olympus, 60mm f2.8 Sigma, 60mm f2.8 Olympus, 75mm f1.8 Olympus and boy they are sharp from the get go. I also use a 4/3 (not m43) 25mm f1.4 Panasonic - Leica and in the centre from wide open it is superb at all settings (and even better across the frame stopped down). I guess designing lenses for this sensor size is just easier. I cannot comment on the wider lenses or lenses that are stopped well down as I seldom stop down more than about f11 as a matter of good practice to avoid diffraction issues.

Like you a further attraction is the physical effort involved in lugging big cameras (and assorted lenses etc) around all day. It usually is a recipe for a painful neck and back in my case.
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Old 02-25-2018   #13
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What made you choose m4/3 vs a Fuji?

B2 (;-?
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Old 02-25-2018   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillBingham2 View Post
What made you choose m4/3 vs a Fuji?

B2 (;-?
I don't know about others but in my case it was pure chance. I had the chance to handle an OM D EM 5 belonging to a gent from whom I was buying another camera. I was impressed with what I saw.

Some time later a fully optioned one (hand grip etc) came up locally at a very good price so I bought it. I had in fact been considering a Fuji as I preferred their bigger sensor and the sensor technology it is known for.

Once youa re in a system it is hard to get out. That OMD EM 5 was a gateway drug.
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Old 02-25-2018   #15
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Congrats, Chris. I'm looking forward to the results of your testing, as I trust your methodology.

Myself, I've been using micro-4/3 since the very first Lumix G1, back in December 2008 (seems like a long time). I currently use a G7 and GH3.

Regarding dynamic range comparisons between formats, I often wonder whether the differences between formats is more to do with the manufacturing process technology of the sensor, rather than the size. If you crop a larger sensor image to the same size as micro-4/3, would it suddenly have less dynamic range?

Anyway, I'm looking forward to your new adventure.

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Old 02-25-2018   #16
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Nice pictures Chris. Sorry to hear about your poor health. I hope things improve for you.

PS every book store should have a cat like that
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Old 02-25-2018   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillBingham2 View Post
What made you choose m4/3 vs a Fuji?

B2 (;-?
The Xtrans sensors have too many issues. I wanted something that would 'just work' using my normal workflow, and that meant something with a Bayer sensor.

I wanted a mirrorless system because I wanted small and light. My options were Fuji, M4/3, Sony, and Canon's EOS M5 system.

I rejected Canon because they have few lenses for their mirrorless system. I rejected Sony because their lenses were to expensive for me, and because I hate the ergonomics of Sony cameras. I teach photo lessons, and my students who have had Sony Cameras have been the most frustrating ones to work with because the cameras were so difficult to use.

Olympus has affordable, excellent quality lenses, and I have always loved Olympus gear going back to childhood when I got my start with an OM-G 35mm slr.
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Old 02-25-2018   #18
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Nice pictures Chris. Sorry to hear about your poor health. I hope things improve for you.

PS every book store should have a cat like that

Its not going to improve. I suffered a stroke that left my body greatly weakened. Permanent nervous system damage, it cannot be cured.

I agree on the cats. Here's more pics of them:









She is playing with a rubber snake in the front window.
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Old 02-26-2018   #19
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Congrats on getting the PEN-F. It's a beautiful and capable camera that I wanted.

Really there is no bad prime lens from Oly in the M4/3 pool. Even the body cap lenses are usable!

This one was taken with my humble pen ep3 with the humble 17/2.8. Jpeg.
Enjoy your Pen-F!

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Old 02-26-2018   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
........
Olympus has affordable, excellent quality lenses, and I have always loved Olympus gear going back to childhood when I got my start with an OM-G 35mm slr.
Does Olympus make adjustments for distortion the way some Mfgs. do?

B2 (;->
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Old 02-26-2018   #21
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Welcome to the Micro 4/3 Club!

I have been a micro 4/3 user for a few years. I originally used Olympus E-p1 and E-p3 bodies mounted with 20mm f/1.7 Panasonic, 45mm f/1.8 Olympus, and 14mm f/2.5 Panasonic lenses for shooting available light candids at weddings.

I was very satisfied with the image quality produced by my micro 4/3 equipment; however, I was very displeased with the lack of reliability and dependability of the bodies. I got tired of them breaking during wedding ceremonies. At my last wedding with the 4/3, the final straw was when the dial on the top of the E-p3 fell off.

The Fuji X-Pro1 replaced my Olympus as my available light wedding candid camera. Thus far, the X-Pro1 has proven to be more reliable.

I now use my micro 4/3 camera as a digital black & white camera. Often, I use it with my meterless medium format film cameras as a light meter and for test shots.


Candid Wedding Cameras by Narsuitus, on Flickr
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Old 02-26-2018   #22
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I have used m43 on and off since 2010, with health issues its size is a godsend. For most of the work I do the dynamic range is plenty good enough and if I need to do lower light I just use either the Sonys or Samsungs. There are a lot of nice lenses now for m43 possibly the best line up with two makers of cameras constantly adding to the options, though there are now some nice lenses for both Fuji and Sony. As much as the A7 is a wonderful camera it can now get hard to carry it for extended periods of time, the Panasonics can be carried for hours on end.
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Old 02-26-2018   #23
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I think you'll enjoy the m4/3. It should fit you well considering the types of photography you post here on RFF.

Canon has been my main system for almost 20 years but I adopted m4/3 early on in its history by buying both an Olympus E-P1 and Panasonic Lumix G1 and later on the Olympus E-P2. I also used the Olympus standard 4/3 DSLR system with its excellent range of lenses. The small 4/3 format is impressive.

Today I've switched to Fuji, mainly. Fuji's retro designs and familiar handling won me over and they simply fit my uses better. The stories I see about the X-trans sensor problems seem overblown to me. I use Lightroom exclusively and, yes, I can get the "worms" and "watercolor" effect by overdoing the sharpening but it's easy to avoid and I have to say I'm more than happy with Fuji Raw files and the results I'm able to get with a minimum of post processing. I especially love the way B&W looks from Fuji files. I get beautiful 12x18 prints.

I still use m4/3 a bit. I have several m4/3 and standard 4/3 lenses that I'm particularly fond of using. There's an OMD E-M1 with an adapted Zuiko 50-200/2.8-3.5 on hand around the house at all times for an occasional bird shot. M4/3 is especially useful for telephotos.

You'll get a lot of use out of your new equipment I'm sure.
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Old 02-26-2018   #24
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Chris,

When you say I am going to profile the Olympus camera with my Sekonic L-758DR meter can you elaborate on this? I'm curious how this would be accomplished.
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Old 02-26-2018   #25
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I've found that the files from my E-P5 go through Nik Silver Efex nicely. So I now have a "2 format" digital B&W setup that is analogous to 35mm and medium format, with the Olympus m43 being the 35mm camera and the Sigma Merrils being the medium format.
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Sensor Technologies Really Have Improved
Old 02-26-2018   #26
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Sensor Technologies Really Have Improved

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
...Once I got all the settings figured out, I have been VERY impressed. The images are slightly noisier than those from the Canon at the same ISO settings, but Lightroom's noise reduction eliminates it without losing detail.

...
Here is a link comparing the Canon and Pen F low-light performance. Unfortunately you have to zoom the chart. These data are normalized with respect to sensor area. The 5D Mark II 24 X 36 mm sensor only affords a ~1/3 stop (EV) advantage. However the 6D Mark II offers about a 2/3 stop advantage.

Similarly the dynamic range data show little, if any advantage for the 5D Mark II.

A larger senor area always means more total light which in turn means more total signal. But newer cameras often have lower read-noise levels. Here's some more data. In terms of perceived image quality in low light (or in shadow regions in brighter light) neither the signal level nor the noise level alone tell the whole story. it's the S/N that counts.

It is common for an older 24 X 36 mm camera to have similar or lower signal-to-noise ratio than a newer design with a smaller sensor. Then the convenience of reduced size and weight brings little, if any penalty.
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Old 02-26-2018   #27
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glad you've found something that works and creates images you enjoy.

personally, i find full-frame worth the extra bulk and weight. the difference in image quality between FF and m43 is quite apparent to my eyes. i've tested the Pen-F, EM-5 II, A7 and 6D. The A7 and 6D images are just so much more rich and pleasing.

there are also some surprisingly compact FF setups as well (6D + EF 40/2.8, A7 + Sonnar 35/2.8, M240 + Voigt 35/2.5).

but it's all about what satisfies your criteria. hope you continue enjoying the new setup.
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Old 02-26-2018   #28
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It is kind of amazing what they meanwhile can get out of the µ4/3 sensor - Olympus and Panasonic.
I prefer Olympus a little more. But that is very personal.
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Old 02-26-2018   #29
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Chris, I think you will come to love using a mirrorless, not just because of the size and weight, but the selection of quite good lenses available today makes it a good choice.

I have an EP-2, and I gave my wife and son various EP models as well. My son has permanently borrowed some of my lenses, so I end up using adapted lenses on my body -- when I use it. I have other small cameras in my closet that get much more attention. Partly because I just like those cameras more, but also because I sometimes don't like the quality of the images from the EP2. Not that they aren't perfectly good images, but the "kit lens" that came with the body is not up to my standards, and the colors of the images are somehow different. Still, I've exhibited at least 2 images from that camera, so I'm obviously being picky.

I'm pretty sure you'll end up using good lenses and being very happy.
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Old 02-26-2018   #30
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great move Chris, I'm sure you'll enjoy your Pen F! Sorry to hear about your health issue. Life is sometimes not easy but I think your passion for what you are doing (photography) in excellent way will help you to go on.
Nice photos, specially strong the portrait of your son (grown up so quick!).
Do you have any feeling about the 4/3 ratio compared to 2/3 ?
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Old 02-26-2018   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bayernfan View Post
glad you've found something that works and creates images you enjoy.

personally, i find full-frame worth the extra bulk and weight. the difference in image quality between FF and m43 is quite apparent to my eyes. i've tested the Pen-F, EM-5 II, A7 and 6D. The A7 and 6D images are just so much more rich and pleasing.

there are also some surprisingly compact FF setups as well (6D + EF 40/2.8, A7 + Sonnar 35/2.8, M240 + Voigt 35/2.5).

but it's all about what satisfies your criteria. hope you continue enjoying the new setup.
The Canon 6D is nearly as big and heavy as my old 5DmkII. The 5DmkII and the Pen-F are both 20mp cameras, and there's little difference in image quality so far as I can see so far. I'm simply not able to carry around such heavy gear anymore.
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Old 02-26-2018   #32
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Chris,

When you say I am going to profile the Olympus camera with my Sekonic L-758DR meter can you elaborate on this? I'm curious how this would be accomplished.

The Sekonic L-758DR is one of several Sekonic meters that allow you to profile a digital camera. This is done by photographing a profiling target sold by Sekonic (it costs $130, and yes it SHOULD have been included with the meter, considering the high price of the meter itself!). The target has a bunch of shades of gray on it. You photograph it using the incident meter to determine exposure, and then make bracketed exposures of it. All of these are opened in Sekonic's profiling software, which analyzes the photos of the profile target and automatically creates the profile, which is loaded to the meter via a USB cable.

The profiling does two things:

1) It takes into account the fact that some digital cameras' ISO settings are not truly accurate.

2) It determines the highlight and shadow clipping points so you know the camera's dynamic range. These points are shown on the meter, and you can use the meter's built-in spotmeter to check different things in the scene to see if anything will be too bright or two dark to render correctly.

I've done this with my Canon 5DmkII, and it is useful. The profile can be done at different ISO settings on a camera, so when you set the meter to different ISO settings, it will give correct exposure on the camera at any ISO.
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Old 02-26-2018   #33
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Congrats on getting the PEN-F. It's a beautiful and capable camera that I wanted.

Really there is no bad prime lens from Oly in the M4/3 pool. Even the body cap lenses are usable!

This one was taken with my humble pen ep3 with the humble 17/2.8. Jpeg.
Enjoy your Pen-F!


That is beautiful!
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Old 03-10-2018   #34
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Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
The Sekonic L-758DR is one of several Sekonic meters that allow you to profile a digital camera. This is done by photographing a profiling target sold by Sekonic (it costs $130, and yes it SHOULD have been included with the meter, considering the high price of the meter itself!). The target has a bunch of shades of gray on it. You photograph it using the incident meter to determine exposure, and then make bracketed exposures of it. All of these are opened in Sekonic's profiling software, which analyzes the photos of the profile target and automatically creates the profile, which is loaded to the meter via a USB cable.

The profiling does two things:

1) It takes into account the fact that some digital cameras' ISO settings are not truly accurate.

2) It determines the highlight and shadow clipping points so you know the camera's dynamic range. These points are shown on the meter, and you can use the meter's built-in spotmeter to check different things in the scene to see if anything will be too bright or two dark to render correctly.

I've done this with my Canon 5DmkII, and it is useful. The profile can be done at different ISO settings on a camera, so when you set the meter to different ISO settings, it will give correct exposure on the camera at any ISO.
OK, I have finally profiled my Pen-F with my Sekonic meter.


Exposure Level:


This is the most interesting thing. I've had the camera a few weeks now, and felt like the photos were coming out a bit underexposed using an incident meter (the Sekonic L-758DR with its default settings).

Profiling confirmed what I was seeing. The camera's ISO settings are about 1/3 stop off. The profile on the Sekonic meter makes it give 1/3 stop more exposure than using the meter without a profile. Now my photos are coming out perfectly exposed. So, if the camera is set to ISO-200, its real sensitivity is only ISO-160. Profiling built this adjustment into the Sekonic meter, so I can set both the meter and the camera to ISO-200 (or whatever ISO I choose) and the exposures will be correct.

My Canon camera's ISO settings were honest; the Sekonic profile did not need to adjust the exposure level for it.


Dynamic Range:

The Olympus Pen-F has slightly less shadow range and slightly more highlight range than the Canon 5DmkII. The overall range is about the same though if you count number of stops from the shadow clipping point to the highlight clipping point.
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Old 03-11-2018   #35
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Congrats Chris. The M43rds system is a great system. Olympus is the road i took. The ergonomics suited me and their range of lenses are great as well. I have purchased other branded lenses being the Panasonic 25mm, Sigma 19mm and the Samyang 12mm.
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Old 03-11-2018   #36
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Welcome to M43 Chris! When not shooting wildlife I mostly shoot BW film, but my Pen F with Panasonic 20/1.7 makes a wonderful pocketable companion.

The Oly menu system is a pain, but the latest software for installing firmware updates allows you to back up your menu settings, which can save a lot of grief.

Cheers,

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Old 03-11-2018   #37
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Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
I am in extremely bad health now. I just cannot carry a big SLR everywhere like I used to.
I hope you feel better (or as good as you can) and continue with this series. The most important thing, photography wise, is to be able to keep doing it. I don't care if you had to use a phone... I enjoy your work. Take care.
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Old 03-11-2018   #38
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personally, i find full-frame worth the extra bulk and weight. the difference in image quality between FF and m43 is quite apparent to my eyes.
I agree...but APSC is the sweet spot.
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Old 03-11-2018   #39
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I am sorry about your added health problems too Chris. I hope you can still do as many photos as you wish, and the little Oly can help. I recommend you have a look at the 25/1.4 DG Summilux lens. I have one of those as well as the 14/2.5, 17/1.8 and 45/1.8. The Minilux, as I call it, gives the best quality photos of the lenses I have, in my subjective judgement.
John Mc
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Old 03-11-2018   #40
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Sorry to hear about your health, Chris.
Just keep yourself busy with your photographic passion. As good a remedy as any, in my post CABG opinion.

Congratulations on the camera acquisition.

Best wishes.
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