Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Coffee With Mentors > Bill Pierce - Leica M photog and author

Bill Pierce - Leica M photog and author

 

ďOur autobiography is written in our contact sheets,  and our opinion of the world in our selectsĒ  

"Never ever confuse sharp with good, or you will end up shaving with an ice cream cone and licking a razor blade."  

 

Bill Pierce is one of the most successful Leica photographers and authors ever. I initially "met" Bill in the wonderful 1973 15th edition Leica Manual (the one with the M5 on the cover). I kept reading and re-reading his four chapters, continually amazed at his knoweldge and ability, thinking "if I only knew a small part of what this guy knows... wow."  I looked foward to his monthly columns in Camera 35 and devoured them like a starving man.  Bill has worked as a photojournalist  for 25 years, keyword: WORK.  Many photogs dream of the professional photographer's  life that Bill has earned and enjoyed.  Probably Bill's most famous pic is Nixon departing the White House for the last time, victory signs still waving. 

 

Bill  has been published in many major magazines, including  Time, Life, Newsweek, U.S. News, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, New York Magazine, Stern, L'Express and Paris Match.  :His published books include  The Leica Manual,  War Torn, Survivors and Victims in the Late 20th Century, Homeless in America,  Human Rights in China,  Children of War.  Add to that numerous exhibitions at major galleries and museums.  Magazine contributions include  Popular Photography,  Camera 35, Leica Manual,  Photo District News, the Encyclopedia of Brittanica, the Digital Journalist, and now RFF.  Major awards include Leica Medal of Excellence, Overseas Press Club's Oliver Rebbot Award for Best Photojournalism from Abroad,  and the World Press Photo's Budapest Award. Perhaps an ever bigger award is Tom Abrahamsson's comment: "If you want to know Rodinal, ask Bill."

 

I met Bill in person through our mutual friend Tom Abrahamsson.  In person his insight and comments are every bit as interesting and engaging as his writing.  He is a great guy who really KNOWS photography.  I am happy to say he has generously agreed to host this forum at RFF  From time to time Bill will bring up topics, but you are also invited to ask questions.  Sit down and enjoy the ride!

 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Film!!!
Old 02-10-2018   #1
Bill Pierce
Registered User
 
Bill Pierce's Avatar
 
Bill Pierce is offline
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,173
Film!!!

For some time now my only film cameras have been 2 large format film cameras used ocassionally for personal work. Digital took over, first, journalism and, now, much of professional photography. But recently I was given a gift of several used film cameras. Because of the sheet film cameras, I still have a functioning darkroom. I wanted to know what the film users on the forum are doing and why they are doing it.

(1) Film processed at a lab or in your darkroom/bathroom/or wherever you could load a film tank?

(2) From these negatives or slides, are prints made in your darkroom or sent out to a lab for silver, chemical color or inkjet or are they scanned and ink jet printed in your office? Or are prints a thing of the past now replaced by a computer screen?

(3) Or are you doing something truly unusual like archival carbon prints on a modified inkjet?

I have one friend who produces archival silver prints because museums like them, and it is the way he has always worked and in which he feels comfortable. I have other friends who shoot film because they feel it slows them down and makes them a better photographer, but they scan the film and make inkjet prints. Iím sure there are many other reasons for shooting film. But Iím sitting here with several film cameras and would love to know some of the things I might look forward to if I start shooting a little film again.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #2
Corran
Registered User
 
Corran is offline
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 1,308
From light to print, it's all done in my darkroom by my hands on traditional materials, as God intended.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #3
Deardorff38
Registered User
 
Deardorff38's Avatar
 
Deardorff38 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 814
I use a Rolleflex, a Deardorff 5x7 & occasionally a Leica. I have a Durst 138 for 5x7 and a Beseler for 35,6x6 and 4x5. I still have a stash of Azo for contact printing. Otherwise it's silver gelatin fibre papers in Ansco 130. I have no interest in digital printing. It's more like a choice of musical taste than any question of one or the other being superior....
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #4
SaveKodak
Registered User
 
SaveKodak is offline
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: New York City
Posts: 573
I own a film scanning lab called Northeast Photographic in Maine.

The people left over interested enough in photography that actually own a camera, are naturally drawn to film for at least some degree of their work. I help them get digital files that look great from full rolls of film.

It's sort of like how Best Buy recently announced that they were discontinuing sales of CDs, but not vinyl. People who love a thing (photography) are not necessarily interested in the path of least resistance. The experience of shooting with a film camera is more fun than shooting digital.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #5
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 70
Posts: 4,625
I've been wet printing far too long to quit. I started in 1958 and it's just a part of me. Wet printing has not only been a huge part of my personal life it was a major part of my commercial business until taking the business digital in 2000.

Still it's quite important to me in both my personal work and my business. I'm still engaged in commercial work that's mostly digital but I do a lot of documentary work where I document the rapidly fading culture of Appalachia where I live. I photograph serpent handling in churches, cock fights, kkk cross burnings, moonshiners and many more aspects of the culture. I sell images through galleries and do exhibitions for museums. My work is in perminate collections n several museums.

As you mentioned, museums like archival silver prints. I've willed my roughly 100,000 documentary negatives to a museum that's established an archive for my and one other photographer who documented the area from the late 1890 through the early 1960's. I also donate archival silver gelatin prints to them.

I still shoot everything from 35mm to 8x10. I no longer have an 8x10 enlarger but contact them and enlarge negs up to 5x7 with a Durst 138, Omega D5 and Focomat.

You asked about alternative processes, I do platinum as well as collodion wet plate for both pleasure and sale through galleries.

A few years ago I was going to retire and shut my darkroom down and go full digital for personal work. I foolishly sold off my darkroom but quickly realized I missed film and wound up buying essentially the same equipment back and building an ever better darkroom. I have to say I get great joy out of wet printing and shooting film. Ive commented to several clients that id go back to film in a heartbeat if I could. By the way, I didn't fully retire. I work a day or so a week and really enjoy my clients and work. I found after 50 years it hard to quit something you love.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #6
johnf04
Registered User
 
johnf04 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Dunedin, New Zealand
Age: 69
Posts: 367
Mine is a hobbyist interest - I buy old cameras, get them going if possible, and run film through them. I use monochrome film which I process and scan myself. Some scans are printed, at a local camera shop through their consumer digital machine.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #7
Richard G
Registered User
 
Richard G's Avatar
 
Richard G is offline
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 37,47 S
Posts: 5,195
CAMERA reasons:

I have been shooting the little Leica thread mount cameras a lot recently, especially the newest one a very functional IIIf with a 50 Elmar in good condition. First, it's small. It slips into the outer pocket of my usual daily bag. It is always on, the battery never flat. It doesn't hunt with autofocus. With the SBOOI accessory finder is is very quick to grab a shot. It is quiet.

At the opposite end of the spectrum I bought a Hasselblad recently. Mostly I have used it on a tripod. The machine itself, like the IIIf is part of the experience. I am not in the school of "a camera is just a tool." It is an important part of the experience and the immersion in photography. The Zeiss lenses and the medium format perspective and tonality are wonderful.

FILM reasons:

. I love the flexibility of colour negative film. Deliberately over-exposing two stops for shadow detail. Digital is the exact opposite, and slide film. Mostly I have been shooting Ektar lately. It has fine grain and a real Kodak signature reminiscent of Kodachrome sometimes. The M9-P CCD sensor is not so far from that either. Then Tri-X, also very flexible. And certainly familiar. Sometimes the emotion evoked by film image leaves digital far behind.

PRINT:

Inkjet. I think it can work very well with good inks on good paper.
__________________
Richard
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #8
Bill Clark
Registered User
 
Bill Clark's Avatar
 
Bill Clark is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Minnetonka, Minnesota
Age: 71
Posts: 2,539
Great idea for a thread here.

Only make photographs with black and white film.

I process the film and print in my analog darkroom. The largest print I have made so far is 16” x 20”.

I only do projects with film because of nostalgia as it is the medium where I began my photography journey.

Today my wife and I drove to St. Paul to see and make photographs of the ice palace and other sculptures in Rice Park.

Smiles and still lots of fun.
__________________
I make photographs as a return ticket to a moment otherwise gone.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #9
K14
Registered User
 
K14's Avatar
 
K14 is offline
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington State
Posts: 277
I still shoot film and have a temporary darkroom, processing trays on the washer/dryer in my pantry.

I've also been sticking to film for my astrophotography, no worries of running out of power, no wires to trip on in the dark, loosing my night vision from the glare of a computer screen or camera LCD. Setup time is minutes for film compared to an hour using digital.

Hypering film is what I miss and want to get back to, see how sensitive the modern films emulsions are today.

My C41 goes to the camera shop, process only. I then scan and print. I do agree that film slows me down and I do take better pictures.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #10
Shac
Registered User
 
Shac is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: White Rock, BC, Canada
Posts: 1,103
Develop at home (B&W), scan and inkjet prints. Had a darkroom since I was 12 and would rather not go back. All thinks equal the controls & consistency in digital printing suit me just fine.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #11
shimokita
白黒
 
shimokita's Avatar
 
shimokita is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Japan, Tokyo
Posts: 800
01) I support the local lab - the mom & pop shop were they have told me that I am their only film camera user (SLR / RF). They make their small income from disposable cameras, digital prints, digital enlargements, portraits, and small photo related items. Recently they are closed one day a week.

02) The local gets the enlargement work that I do from digital files... I scan all my own film (135 or 120 format), mostly B&W recent years. It's actually less expensive to have color film developed vs. B&W.

03) Nothing that I would consider out of the ordinary... but I really enjoy getting the enlargements ( 20x30 cm) which I frame.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #12
dfranklin
Registered User
 
dfranklin is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Cambridge, MA, USA
Age: 43
Posts: 99
My serious interest in photography began only about 5 years ago. Since then I have acquired several MF cameras and one 4x5 view camera. Three years ago I built a darkroom in my basement--the first darkroom I have ever had regular access to. I develop my films there and print them with an Omega enlarger. The process is time consuming, but the images I produce this way are, I think, far better than what I get out of my digital camera. At least they are more satisfying, and ultimately more memorable (to me), since I spend so much time with them. And to my eye, at least, a silver gelatin print has a 'depth' that can't be replicated by an ink jet printer.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #13
fuji645
Registered User
 
fuji645's Avatar
 
fuji645 is offline
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 131
I shoot film and digital. Film is mainly medium format (6x6, 6x4.5, 6x9). Develop and scan for prints for exhibition/shows and personal use. Prints on a Canon Pro 9500 Mk II or outsource to a lab for larger than 13x17. Shooting film (even 35mm) is a cathartic and extremely pleasurable experience for me personally.
__________________
Fuji GS 645, Nettar 6x6, Kiev III and a bunch of other stuff
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #14
farlymac
PF McFarland
 
farlymac's Avatar
 
farlymac is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 6,244
1) Still have it done at a lab, but I need to keep hunting for a better place as some of them have no idea what quality control is.

2) I kind of got away from making prints (inkjet), but once I have my new set-up running (changing over my whole computer system), I plan on going back in the files and printing the really good ones.

3) Ha! If I had the facilities, I'd be doing cyanotypes.

I still shoot more film than digital, but it all depends on the situation. If it's an event, definitely digital. Most of the other time it's just because I like using my film cameras. It's what I'm most used to, and a lot easier to get the look I want. Plus the investment in bodies and glass would be going to waste if I didn't use them now and then.

PF
__________________
Waiting for the light
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #15
jan normandale
Film is the other way
 
jan normandale's Avatar
 
jan normandale is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: on Location
Posts: 3,910
(1) Film processed at a lab or in your darkroom/bathroom/or wherever you could load a film tank?

BW, C41, E6 at home Jobo CPE2

(2) From these negatives or slides, are prints made in your darkroom or sent out to a lab for silver, chemical color or inkjet or are they scanned and ink jet printed in your office? Or are prints a thing of the past now replaced by a computer screen?

Epson V750 for 120, 4x5, 5x7 + Minolta Dimage Scan Dual IV for 135

Scans are corrected for levels and dodging / burning then saved. Printing is done by pro labs


(3) Or are you doing something truly unusual like archival carbon prints on a modified inkjet?

I am investigating ‘alternative’ processes and have just picked up “Jill Enfield s Guide to Photographic Alternative Processes”

I have one friend who produces archival silver prints because museums like them, and it is the way he has always worked and in which he feels comfortable. I have other friends who shoot film because they feel it slows them down and makes them a better photographer, but they scan the film and make inkjet prints. I’m sure there are many other reasons for shooting film. But I’m sitting here with several film cameras and would love to know some of the things I might look forward to if I start shooting a little film again.

I shoot film because I have 2 fridges full of it. I also shoot with a Nikon digital p/s and a Sony A7. I have no favourite. Horses for courses... film does some things better as does digital. I take this into account when using any camera film or digital.
__________________
RFF Gallery
flickr
Blog

it's all about light
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-10-2018   #16
telenous
Registered User
 
telenous is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,579
Most of my cameras use film. I develop and print both ways (dry/wet) but mostly dry, to be honest. Nothing fancy, scan + inkjet or small darkroom stuff. I have one petty reason for using film -- I just like the cameras of old. A somewhat loftier (or maybe not as petty) one is that film provides for a physical fixed reference point to the scene photographed. The very fact of the exposed negative heightens sometimes my emotional response to a photo. It's as if you can still touch that which was.

.
__________________
- Alkis

flickr
instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #17
dmr
Registered Abuser
 
dmr's Avatar
 
dmr is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Somewhere in Middle America
Posts: 4,521
Quote:
(1) Film processed at a lab or in your darkroom/bathroom/or wherever you could load a film tank?
Lately I've been doing all film in the Jobo in the kitchen, temporary set-up. The main reason I got that was because the last real camera shop that does processing has cut back the schedule and it's a multi-day turn-around time now.

Quote:
(2) From these negatives or slides, are prints made in your darkroom or sent out to a lab for silver, chemical color or inkjet or are they scanned and ink jet printed in your office? Or are prints a thing of the past now replaced by a computer screen?
For those I print I do it in, well, LOL, my "office" at home, spare bedroom. I maybe print out one per roll at most. As I've said for a long time, if I have one real keeper per roll I'm tickled pink! I end up posting more of them on line than I print out.

Quote:
(3) Or are you doing something truly unusual like archival carbon prints on a modified inkjet?
Uh, say what?
__________________
My (NEW) Gallery
My Blog
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #18
sepiareverb
genius and moron
 
sepiareverb's Avatar
 
sepiareverb is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: St Johnsbury VT
Posts: 8,302
I shoot both film and digital cameras. Been in the darkroom a whole lot for the past four months or so, and loving every minute of it. I learned to print in 1977, and have rarely been without a darkroom since.

I print little of the digital work, the thought of knocking out two dozen work prints on the Epson has so little appeal. Every few months I knuckle down and do it tho.
__________________
-Bob
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #19
gnuyork
Registered User
 
gnuyork is offline
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 709
I've been shooting more film lately, and have plenty of film cameras to use from 35mm on up to 4x5. I got a Rolleiflex last summer and have been really enjoying that (what a fun camera).

I process B&W film on my own here at the house, scan and work on the images in Lightroom. Sometimes I may make an inkjet print. I post a lot of my stuff on my Instagram page, which is a mix of my film work and digital.

I do have a few inkjet printers including a 44" wide format canon (that needs servicing at very high cost!), and some Epsons. I do have an older Epson I converted to carbon inks. But I don't use it anymore.

Down the road, I'd like to get my darkroom set up. I have everything for it including 4 enlargers, but not much motivation in organizing and setting up. One day....

For color film and transparencies, I send off to a Lab in Rochester, NY. - processing only. I scan and print myself.

My only complaint with film, is the smell of fixer and how much water I waste processing rolls of film.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #20
ptpdprinter
Registered User
 
ptpdprinter is offline
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,682
I shoot black and white film and process it myself. I also do a lot of digital black and white. For color work, I shoot digital. I wet print in my darkroom. I also scan and inkjet print at home. I print all my own digital work. I print both scanned film and digital on platinum/palladium. I have done some carbon printing, but I currently don't have room to make tissue.
__________________
ambientlightcollection.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #21
Deklari
Registered User
 
Deklari's Avatar
 
Deklari is offline
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 379
I have many old and antique cameras, from large format 8x10 to 24x24mm film. B&W film I process by myself and sett full darkroom for print it. I like contact print from 8x10 and 5x7 format. I also scan all 120 and 35mm films. But I only print them in darkroom. All color film I send off to a local Lab.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #22
Rob-F
Likes Leicas
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is online now
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Age: 78
Posts: 6,057
I do my own developing and printing in my darkroom. I seldom scan black & white film. I'd much rather wet print. I've bought four printers. The first three, including two Canons became junk in a disappointingly short time. The fourth one, I haven't unpacked from its box yet. It's an HP. So we will see how it does.
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #23
charjohncarter
Registered User
 
charjohncarter's Avatar
 
charjohncarter is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Danville, CA, USA
Posts: 8,781
I do develop my B&W and send my color to a lab.

I digitalize my negatives (color and B&W) and send the files to a lab for prints. As an aside I really like laser exposed but wet printed photos on 'True B&W Paper' form my lab.

I don't do any alternative processes, but I love Carbon prints: nothing like them.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #24
giganova
Registered User
 
giganova is offline
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,429
My house is too small for a wet darkroom.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #25
ChrisPlatt
Thread Killer
 
ChrisPlatt's Avatar
 
ChrisPlatt is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Queens NYC
Age: 58
Posts: 2,839
I've already developed black and white film in my new place. A photo flatbed scanner is connected to my Windows 7 PC.
My Windows XP film scanner will wait while I decide whether to set up an additional PC or a single dual-boot system.

I'm still in the planning phase to turn my tiny bathroom into an occasional darkroom for wet printing, which is my true photographic passion.
It will be a challenge to design and construct a suitable work surface for the enlarger etc. which can be disassembled and stored in a closet.

I'm planning to use a couple weeks of my annual leave this year to get these and too many other new home projects sorted out...

Chris
__________________
Bring back the latent image!
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #26
dfranklin
Registered User
 
dfranklin is offline
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Cambridge, MA, USA
Age: 43
Posts: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by telenous View Post
A somewhat loftier (or maybe not as petty) one is that film provides for a physical fixed reference point to the scene photographed. The very fact of the exposed negative heightens sometimes my emotional response to a photo. It's as if you can still touch that which was.

.
+1

I think about the 'touch' factor all the time when I'm shooting film. In my day job, I'm a professor of literature, so I often think about the difference between film and digital in terms of the difference between metonymy and metaphor. (Bear with me.) Metonymy = the production of meaning through contiguity, metaphor = the production of meaning through similarity. A digital image is, at some level, a translation of a pattern of light and shadow into a corresponding pattern of 1's and 0's. A negative is a material object that has been permanently altered by contact with the light. When looking at my negatives, I often think about the fact that I'm looking at a material trace of the very photons that were there when I opened the shutter.

OK, that probably sounds like a bunch of romantic nonsense. But I guess that's what literature professors do.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #27
Bill Clark
Registered User
 
Bill Clark's Avatar
 
Bill Clark is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Minnetonka, Minnesota
Age: 71
Posts: 2,539
Isn’t it photons that cause a batch of zeros and ones on a sensor to be directed with the aid of a computer and software on a digital camera that puts together an image we can see, the same photons that can be used to expose film? For me, like film I use RAW capture and develop with my iMac and usually working with Photoshop.

Instead of developing film and using my analog darkroom for making prints I have my CF card and other storage devices that I can process with my iMac. And view many different ways.

At any rate, either medium for me achieves the same result.
__________________
I make photographs as a return ticket to a moment otherwise gone.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #28
jbrubaker
Registered User
 
jbrubaker's Avatar
 
jbrubaker is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfranklin View Post
+1

A negative is a material object that has been permanently altered by contact with the light. When looking at my negatives, I often think about the fact that I'm looking at a material trace of the very photons that were there when I opened the shutter.
I like this way of thinking about film! thank you ---john.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #29
philosli
Registered User
 
philosli is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pierce View Post
For some time now my only film cameras have been 2 large format film cameras used ocassionally for personal work. Digital took over, first, journalism and, now, much of professional photography. But recently I was given a gift of several used film cameras. Because of the sheet film cameras, I still have a functioning darkroom. I wanted to know what the film users on the forum are doing and why they are doing it.

(1) Film processed at a lab or in your darkroom/bathroom/or wherever you could load a film tank?
I process BW myself. For E-6 and C-41, I send them to a lab.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pierce View Post
(2) From these negatives or slides, are prints made in your darkroom or sent out to a lab for silver, chemical color or inkjet or are they scanned and ink jet printed in your office? Or are prints a thing of the past now replaced by a computer screen?
I scan all developed films. I used to have a makeshift darkroom and made BW silver gelatin prints. However, that was gone now but I do plan to resurrect it in the near future. I send my scanned files to online print service every now and then to get cheap 4x6 prints or a photobook.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pierce View Post
(3) Or are you doing something truly unusual like archival carbon prints on a modified inkjet?
No.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pierce View Post
I have one friend who produces archival silver prints because museums like them, and it is the way he has always worked and in which he feels comfortable. I have other friends who shoot film because they feel it slows them down and makes them a better photographer, but they scan the film and make inkjet prints. Iím sure there are many other reasons for shooting film. But Iím sitting here with several film cameras and would love to know some of the things I might look forward to if I start shooting a little film again.
I don't have any digital camera except the one on my phone. All of my "real" cameras are film cameras. I was never satisfied with the digital photos so I completely abandon the digital and go back to films. I almost carry at least one camera each day and take photos whenever & wherever I can.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #30
Deklari
Registered User
 
Deklari's Avatar
 
Deklari is offline
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Clark View Post
Isnít it photons that cause a batch of zeros and ones on a sensor to be directed with the aid of a computer and software on a digital camera that puts together an image we can see, the same photons that can be used to expose film? For me, like film I use RAW capture and develop with my iMac and usually working with Photoshop.

Instead of developing film and using my analog darkroom for making prints I have my CF card and other storage devices that I can process with my iMac. And view many different ways.

At any rate, either medium for me achieves the same result.
Dual nature of light
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #31
Ronald M
Registered User
 
Ronald M is offline
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,516
Buy film Spool as required Shoot Develop in D76 1:1 Print with focomat.

Train next generation as much as I can.

Do more digital than film lately as I can do more with my computer. Send to a few labs that do good work. Large projects are always digital. Personal 50 50.

Dislike using computer as medium.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-11-2018   #32
Ko.Fe.
Kostya Fedot
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Posts: 7,427
Why? Because it is different from digital. Gear and results.

1) Lab? I'm not this rich.
2)Color is by inks, BW is inks and silver gelatin print.
3)"archival carbon prints on a modified inkjet", meh. "Used with the Epson range of professional media, UltraChrome delivers lightfastness
ratings of up to 75 years for colour and over 200 years for black-and-white".
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2018   #33
Timmyjoe
Registered User
 
Timmyjoe's Avatar
 
Timmyjoe is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 3,004
After decades of lugging around multiple (D)SLR's with tele zooms & the like, for the last four or five years I've been trying to find a camera(s) that give me the image quality I want, in the smallest, least intimidating package, with manual controls. This is the best I could come up with so far:



1) Process all my B&W (95% of the film I shoot) at home
2) Used to print in home darkroom, but now scan & print digitally
3) Nothing fancy

Best,
-Tim
__________________
http://www.timcarrollphotography.com

New Photo Books
Sturgis Stories
& Scenes From Sturgis
now available
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2018   #34
dasuess
Nikon Freak
 
dasuess's Avatar
 
dasuess is offline
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Age: 68
Posts: 507
I am all in with digital and have been for quite awhile. I have scanned all my 35mm B+W negatives, slides and most of my color negatives. I do all my own printing with an Epson R3000, although I have "farmed out" some larger canvas prints. Planning on picking up an Epson P800 in the next year so I can make larger prints. Gave away my Beseler 23CII to another RFF member when we downsized to condo living 4 years ago. I still have a Nikon F that I purchased new back in 1972, but it has not had film through it for at least 15 years - keeping it for the memories of where I have been with it. I may end up with an S2 that I have committed to buying when a certain person passes away. Not sure I'll use it, but you never know. These days I spend my time lugging a Nikon Df with vintage Nikkor lenses converted to AI for landscape photography. Just before Christmas I picked up a used Fuji X-Pro1 and 18mm/f2 that I plan on being my sole camera for a two week trip to Ireland later this year. Nothing exotic for me - too old and set in my ways.
__________________
"You can't count on others to think or see for you." David Vestal, The Craft of Photography

David A. Suess
Nikon Df: 24/f2.8, 28/f3.5, 35f/2, 43-86/f3.5, 55/f3.5 Micro, 85/f1.8, 105/f2.5, 180/f2.8, 200/f4, 300/f4.5
http://DavidSuessImages.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2018   #35
presspass
filmshooter
 
presspass is offline
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,223
I use both digital and film. The digital is for work; the film for me. I have several long-term projects, one of which has been going on for 40 years. Those are all done with 35mm black and white film. I have a complete darkroom, including a V-35 enlarger with variable contrast head and a slot processor. There's nothing more relaxing that going into the darkroom for a couple of hours. The prints are all selenium toned and provided on an annual basis to one of the subjects of my project - a local volunteer fire company. The prints provide a durable history of the company, its volunteers, and its activities. I have no intention of giving up on film, prints, or my darkroom.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2018   #36
Bschif
Registered User
 
Bschif's Avatar
 
Bschif is offline
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Centreville VA
Posts: 51
i use B+W, slide and print film, in 120 and 35mm. I generally do the B+W on my own with a Jobo processor and occasionally the E6 in the Jobo also. The print film I send out to The Darkroom in CA. I scan the B+W and slides with my Nikon D700 and use the scans from The Darkroom for the print film.
__________________
My Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2018   #37
Bingley
Registered User
 
Bingley's Avatar
 
Bingley is offline
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sacramento, California
Posts: 5,700
Like a lot of others who responded above, I develop my own black and white film, which is either 35mm or 120, and then scan the negatives at home to get a digital image. I then post-process using Lightroom to eliminate dust spots, straighten the image, and make minor adjustments to correct for exposure errors (the digital equivalent of dodging and burning). I don't have space in my house for a full darkroom that could include wet printing.

For prints, I take the final digitized images to a lab which does custom inkjet printing using high quality inkjet papers. I wish I could get silver gelatin prints done, but that will have to wait until I have more time as I would need to reserve darkroom time at the place that does my inkjet printing.

All of my color film photos are processed at a local lab and scanned there. If I don't like the scans, I can rescan at home.

For me, digital photography is a supplement to film photography, not a replacement. I still prefer to shoot film whenever I can.
__________________
Steve

FS: Zeiss-ZM Planar 50 plus hood, Pentax MX, Voigtlander Ultron 40/2.0 SLII in Pentax K-mount, Takumar 100/2.8 and 35/3.5 lenses: See my ads in Classifieds

M3, M2, R2A, IIIc, IVSB2, & T, and assorted LTM & M lenses
Minolta XD11, Pentax ME Super, and assorted MD Rokkor and Takumar lenses, Rolleicord III, Rolleicord Vb, Rolleiflex Automat MX-EVS

My Flickr
My Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Nothing Fancy
Old 02-12-2018   #38
defconfunk
n00b
 
defconfunk's Avatar
 
defconfunk is offline
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 281
Nothing Fancy

(1) Film processed at a lab or in your darkroom/bathroom/or wherever you could load a film tank?
Colour goes to the lab, but I've largely stopped shooting colour negative. I mostly shoot black and white which I process in my basement.

(2) From these negatives or slides, are prints made in your darkroom or sent out to a lab for silver, chemical color or inkjet or are they scanned and ink jet printed in your office? Or are prints a thing of the past now replaced by a computer screen?
Prints are made in the darkroom (usually 5x7 for 35mm, but sometimes 8x10, 8x10 for medium format). Film isn't "done" in my books until I've got a print in my hand. If I like a print enough to want to share it online, I'll scan it on a flatbed scanner (Epson v600).
I've got a fair bit of resolution to work with in that combination, so I'm tempted to "enlarge it" and print it on my P800, but I haven't done that from any darkroom prints yet.

(3) Or are you doing something truly unusual like archival carbon prints on a modified inkjet?
Nope.
__________________
I have a camera. I enjoy pushing the big button.
http://mattkrull.tumblr.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2018   #39
Rayt
Registered User
 
Rayt's Avatar
 
Rayt is online now
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,901
I shoot b/w film mainly with Leica, Rolleiflex and LF. I process everything in the bathroom. I don’t scan though I should get a flat bed or something. I also own a Monochrom for when the light requires it because I don’t like the look of pushed film. The plan is to have a proper darkroom to print these negs when I retire. If I shoot for other people I have a pretty skilful friend who will scan and provide really nice inkjet prints. Maybe I’ll do that soon but if I go digital i’d rather go all digital given the Monochrom is already so marvellous.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-12-2018   #40
roscoetuff
Registered User
 
roscoetuff is offline
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Washington DC
Age: 62
Posts: 518
Mostly shooting B&W film the last 12 months using Leica M's and Rolleiflex 6008 MF SLR. Develop negs at home... and color sent out to local professional lab that does generally nice work. Their scanning is only so-so. Recently added a Jobo processor primarily so I can add color back to the diet in the next few weeks and I'm glad I did seeing my first Leica color slides, but candidly the Jobo solved some quality control problems in my B&W with its faster rotation for agitation (my earlier Unicolor base was too slow). Still shoot some digital, but rarely more than for making contact sheets. Scan with a Nikon LS8000, post process with Capture One and print with an Epson Surecolor P800 coupled to Colorbyte's Imageprint software. We have a local community darkroom, but so far I'm not feeling the need or the love.

In terms of images produced, I found myself repelled by the lack of texture in some of my early printed digital B&W images... and that really spurred the whole of my return to film. THis has become a more generalized excuse or matter of taste... EXCEPT when viewing output from the very finest photographers using really fantastic gear produced by the likes of a ALPA TC12 with a PhaseOne back (see Luminous Landscape's recent coverage). There I drool, bow down and admit to my unworthiness. Some of it is the gear... more of it is technique and experience. A pro will always be a pro and an amateur an amateur. But for what I can afford to work with as an amateur, film is much more fun, allows and encourages pre-visualization, and avoids the "spray and pray" tendencies that would otherwise cripple my potential. I mean despite all the condescension inherent in the "spray and pray", truth is that it really is fun to see to pull the trigger and see something show up on a screen! So film helps avoid my worst tendencies. Maybe.

Pet digital peeve? People holding their phones up to make snaps of Vermeer's artwork (could be anyone's!) rather than looking at it with their eyes. Dehumanizes the art in front of us and devalues the photos they make that they'll never look at.

At the end of the day, does the instant digital capture become any more fun than pulling a film out of canister to see what the negative looks like? Maybe not for most, but for a few of us... it definitely fills the bill. Thus in my case, post # 4 from "SaveKodak" absolutely nails it. And the delay... may allow or facilitate a more convincingly creative process.
__________________
-JW Mersereau ("Skip")

"Go out looking for one thing, and that's all you'll ever find." Robert J. Flaherty, Cinematographer
"If a day goes by without my doing something related to photography, it's as though I've neglected something essential to my existence, as though I had forgotten to wake up." Richard Avedon, Photographer
ďThereís nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept.Ē Ansel Adams
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 18:26.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.